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Bizarre News: School Arms Kids With Canned Goods in Case a Shooter Shows Up

Posted by on Jan. 14, 2015 at 10:49 AM
  • 7 Replies

School Arms Kids With Canned Goods in Case a Shooter Shows Up

Thinking about potential school shooters is something no parent wants to do, but with so many awful stories in the news, and especially after the Newtown massacre rocked our sense of security over two years ago, it's hard not to want to think of new ways to keep our kids safe. However, one school in Alabama seems to have the wrong idea -- they've opted to "arm" their kids with canned goods.

Seriously, you guys. W.F. Burns Middle School in Valley, Alabama has asked students to bring in canned goods from home "in an effort to fight off intruders in the event of an active shooter situation."

Got that? If a psycho waltzes into your classroom and starts shooting everything up, throw a can of crushed tomatoes or pumpkin pie filling at 'em! Don't you feel safe now?

This is so bizarre it hardly seems like it could be real. However, a special letter was sent home to parents to explain their reasoning.

We realize at first this may seem odd; however, it is a practice that would catch an intruder off-guard. The canned food item could stun the intruder or even knock him out until the police arrive. The canned food item will give the students a sense of empowerment to protect themselves and will make them feel secure in case an intruder enters the classroom.

The initiative apparently stems from and emergency program called "ALICE," which stands for Alert, Lockdown, Inform, Counter, and Evacuate. It's to be used in active school shooter situations, and the throwing of the canned goods falls under the "Counter" measure. School officials say it would be a "last possible option" if such a terrifying scenario actually occurred.

OK, I get what they're trying to do here -- empower the kids. But seriously, what junior higher needs that added level of worry? How is it empowering to tell an 11-year-old that they should be ready to take down someone with a gun with nothing but a can of soup?

Sorry, call me crazy, but I don't want my kids throwing things at school shooters. I want them hiding, not making a sound, playing dead, whatever to keep themselves innocuous. Maybe it's because my kids have terrible aim (there talents lie elsewhere), but the last thing I want them to do is draw the attention of someone with a gun toward them.

This whole initiative seems silly at best, dangerous at worst. Thankfully school shootings are few and far between, so it's not an everyday concern ... but really we should be able to come up with some better options to keep our kids safe than to arm them with pantry items.

What do you think about asking kids to bring in canned goods to counter school shooters?

by on Jan. 14, 2015 at 10:49 AM
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Replies (1-7):
mom2jessnky
by on Jan. 14, 2015 at 11:02 AM

Weird...

sbranom
by Bronze Member on Jan. 14, 2015 at 11:14 AM

Are the kids supposed to walk around with a can in their bag, or are they just supposed to keep a can at each Desk?

NickLukeandEmma
by Courtney on Jan. 14, 2015 at 5:30 PM

This is a little odd but I have been at my kid's school when they do an active shooter drill and hiding them in a closet seems stupid to me too. They say it is in case there is multiple shooters and they leave one outside. How many of these situations are that well thought out? The school is a single level school with doors that lead outside from multiple areas. I would rather a teacher try to get my kids out of dodge than sit and hope they don't get found.

KW123
by on Jan. 14, 2015 at 8:27 PM

Anne Chestnut had a shooting in '91.  

When it happened it was lunch.  School rules were that after you finished eating you had to go outside to the track field.  The school used this rule to hold us out in the track field until it was safe.  They claimed "bomb threat". Later after we were sent home, I found out what happened & who did it.  A neighbor did it.  It was never on the news & he went to juvie for over 18 months. He was a 8th grade who was high at the time.  He ran around school shooting up the ceiling while everyone in that hall was at lunch.  Out of the 4 S boys, K was the bad sheep.  He ended up a crack head & died.

Who knows have many school have had school shooting (& have managed to keep it quiet) before everyone & their babies had cellphone on them.

Quoting NickLukeandEmma:

This is a little odd but I have been at my kid's school when they do an active shooter drill and hiding them in a closet seems stupid to me too. They say it is in case there is multiple shooters and they leave one outside. How many of these situations are that well thought out? The school is a single level school with doors that lead outside from multiple areas. I would rather a teacher try to get my kids out of dodge than sit and hope they don't get found.

KW123
by on Jan. 14, 2015 at 8:30 PM

I agree with the author on this:

''Sorry, call me crazy, but I don't want my kids throwing things at school shooters. I want them hiding, not making a sound, playing dead, whatever to keep themselves innocuous. Maybe it's because my kids have terrible aim (there talents lie elsewhere), but the last thing I want them to do is draw the attention of someone with a gun toward them."

And if the shooter lives s/he could sue the school for being beaned with a can of beans.

NickLukeandEmma
by Courtney on Jan. 14, 2015 at 9:14 PM

I agree that I wouldn't want them to draw attention to themselves. It isn't just that though but say your kid throws the can and it makes the shooter look at them and say he kills their friend. The guilt and ramifications of that would probably destroy a child and any innocence they had would be shattered. I don't think it should ever be up to the students (children) to try and stop it. The adults are the ones who should be in control. I still think getting them out of the school wouldn't be a horrible idea, but in no way do I think a child should ever have to make those decisions.

Quoting KW123:

I agree with the author on this:

''Sorry, call me crazy, but I don't want my kids throwing things at school shooters. I want them hiding, not making a sound, playing dead, whatever to keep themselves innocuous. Maybe it's because my kids have terrible aim (there talents lie elsewhere), but the last thing I want them to do is draw the attention of someone with a gun toward them."

And if the shooter lives s/he could sue the school for being beaned with a can of beans.


darbyakeep45
by Darby on Jan. 15, 2015 at 5:51 AM

Hmmm

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