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Healthy Moms Healthy Moms

healthy eating....is it expensive?????????

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do you believe it???why and why not???


by on Sep. 28, 2010 at 6:00 PM
Replies (21-30):
rkoloms
by on Sep. 30, 2010 at 5:27 PM

I depends on how you eat. Three of us, plus extra teens, eat a most organic, whole foods based diet, and spend around $80 a week on groceries.

Here are my favorite tips:

Make at least some of your own cleaning products. This has the added bonus of bringing fewer toxins into your home

This is what we use for most cleaning (initially used as part of my daughter's 6th grade science fair project). It is cheap (my favorite) and non toxic.
¼ cup white vinegar
¾ cup warm tap water
1 tablespoon baking soda
10 drops of tea tree oil (antibacterial, antifungal, etc.)
2 drops oil of lavender essential oil (antiseptic and smells nice) 

Stop buying paper towels and napkins. Cloth napkins are more fun! Pick up cheap cotton towels at your favorite second hand shop. Save money and trees!!

Past the age of 2, the only beverage that humans need is water. Stop buying juice and sodas; buy milks only for cooking and cereal. You can liven up water with slices of fruits and vegetables; make ice cubes with blueberry eyeballs for the kids.

Replace meats with beans, lentils, tofu, seitan, etc. You can save even more money by using dried beans and lentils and making your own seitan.

Cook from scratch! Home cooked foods taste so much better than the nasty boxed stuff, and you will feel better because you are eating healthier foods. 

Replace simple grains (white flour, white rice, white pasta, etc.) with whole grains (brown rice, whole wheat pasta, whole grain breads, etc.). While whole grains may cost more, they have more nutrition and are more filling, so they really are the better value.

Frozen fruits and vegetables have a longer shelf life than fresh and retain their nutrition longer; they are often a better, less expensive option than fresh.

Once or twice a week have breakfast for dinner. Popular options at my house are: yogurt parfaits with frozen berries and whole grain cereal; veggies omelets with a bit of cheese and whole grain toast; whole grain pancakes with fruit.

Instead of baking a whole batch of cookies, make and freeze cookie dough balls. No one will be tempted to sneak a cookie (you know who you are) and when you do have cookies they will be fresh baked. 

Only go to the grocery store every 8 days. Before you shop, plan all of your meals and snacks for the next 8 days. Write your list, based on what you need to complete your meal plan. Pull any necessary coupons; eat before you go (never go to the grocery store hungry). Most important, buy only what is on your list. The specials at the store are not to save you money; they are to get you to buy items that you don't need. If you won't use it in 3 week, don't buy it!

I have a ton of recipes that are tasty, easy, healthy, family and budget friendly; send me a message offlist if you would like some.

DestMasters
by on Oct. 1, 2010 at 8:41 AM

Yes and no. If you can transition over to doing everything from scratch, it's much cheaper.  

It does cost more to produce foods without chemicals and such. However, these foods are not only more healthy, you'll find that you eat a smaller quantity because you're satisfied sooner and get more nutrition.

ginafreels
by on Oct. 1, 2010 at 10:12 AM

I think healthy eating seems to be more expensive than the junk you can easily get - but well worth the cost difference - it's your health and you need to take care of yourself. Im sure there are places and different ways to cut cost down - but over all I would say it does cost a little more to eat healthy.

ChildrenGoGreen
by on Oct. 1, 2010 at 10:41 AM

Definetely not expensive!  We know that our bodies love: Water, Vegetabes, Fruits, Non fried foods and cooking from scratch. When we cook from scratch we avoid high sodium content foods, preservatives and so many different ingredients that we don't even know what damage they really do to our bodies, and at the same time we are not only losing weight but getting healthier by the minute which in the long run saves us a lot money on medical bills.

 

Nature_girl
by on Oct. 1, 2010 at 10:57 AM

pay more for food now, or pay more for medical bills later.

jenellemarie
by on Oct. 2, 2010 at 1:07 AM

I think it's cheaper to eat healthy.  At least in my home. We are also a hunting family though so we only have to buy chicken.

Every time I see somebody with a cart full of soda, chips, frozen meals, chicken nuggets and things like that I think to myself "Wow...thats alot of money to spend on food that you are going to poop out 10  minutes after eating and need something with actual nutrition that keeps you full afterwards anyway." LOL...I know it's a weird way to think but it's true. 

mrs.phillips123
by on Oct. 2, 2010 at 1:36 AM

 I wish there was a like button for this! great advice!

Quoting rkoloms:

I depends on how you eat. Three of us, plus extra teens, eat a most organic, whole foods based diet, and spend around $80 a week on groceries.

Here are my favorite tips:

Make at least some of your own cleaning products. This has the added bonus of bringing fewer toxins into your home

This is what we use for most cleaning (initially used as part of my daughter's 6th grade science fair project). It is cheap (my favorite) and non toxic.
¼ cup white vinegar
¾ cup warm tap water
1 tablespoon baking soda
10 drops of tea tree oil (antibacterial, antifungal, etc.)
2 drops oil of lavender essential oil (antiseptic and smells nice) 

Stop buying paper towels and napkins. Cloth napkins are more fun! Pick up cheap cotton towels at your favorite second hand shop. Save money and trees!!

Past the age of 2, the only beverage that humans need is water. Stop buying juice and sodas; buy milks only for cooking and cereal. You can liven up water with slices of fruits and vegetables; make ice cubes with blueberry eyeballs for the kids.

Replace meats with beans, lentils, tofu, seitan, etc. You can save even more money by using dried beans and lentils and making your own seitan.

Cook from scratch! Home cooked foods taste so much better than the nasty boxed stuff, and you will feel better because you are eating healthier foods. 

Replace simple grains (white flour, white rice, white pasta, etc.) with whole grains (brown rice, whole wheat pasta, whole grain breads, etc.). While whole grains may cost more, they have more nutrition and are more filling, so they really are the better value.

Frozen fruits and vegetables have a longer shelf life than fresh and retain their nutrition longer; they are often a better, less expensive option than fresh.

Once or twice a week have breakfast for dinner. Popular options at my house are: yogurt parfaits with frozen berries and whole grain cereal; veggies omelets with a bit of cheese and whole grain toast; whole grain pancakes with fruit.

Instead of baking a whole batch of cookies, make and freeze cookie dough balls. No one will be tempted to sneak a cookie (you know who you are) and when you do have cookies they will be fresh baked. 

Only go to the grocery store every 8 days. Before you shop, plan all of your meals and snacks for the next 8 days. Write your list, based on what you need to complete your meal plan. Pull any necessary coupons; eat before you go (never go to the grocery store hungry). Most important, buy only what is on your list. The specials at the store are not to save you money; they are to get you to buy items that you don't need. If you won't use it in 3 week, don't buy it!

I have a ton of recipes that are tasty, easy, healthy, family and budget friendly; send me a message offlist if you would like some.

 

Wife to Matt and Momma 2 1/2 yr old Latham James and our newest addition Lane Jason born in July!




Lilypie First Birthday tickers
moneysaver6
by on Oct. 2, 2010 at 6:09 AM

I'm sorry, but I found this incredibly hysterical!  I can make cookies ahead of time, bake them and freeze them & I'm not tempted to eat them.  I would be fighting temptation LIKE MAD, though, if I had frozen oatmeal chocolate chip cookie dough in the freezer.  YUM!  That is a HUGE weakness of mine! :-)  Of course, ours are made with freshly-ground oat groats & spelt berries, freshly ground flax seed instead of eggs, & freshly-flaked oats added with the chocolate chips (Enjoy Life...so they're NOT cheap).

Quoting rkoloms:

.
Instead of baking a whole batch of cookies, make and freeze cookie dough balls. No one will be tempted to sneak a cookie (you know who you are) and when you do have cookies they will be fresh baked. 

Now...to answer the question and stop making myself hungry thinking of raw cookie dough...

I think eating healthier CAN be more expensive; depending on how and where you shop and whether you grow your own garden or not.

We drink water & use almond milk for cereal.  We buy raw milk occasionally from a farmer in a state south of us.  Our organic raw milk is only $3.50/gallon; cheaper than organic in the stores.  We also buy our raw, organic cheese from them.  It's $2.60/lb as opposed to $17.31/lb or $.6.49 for 6 oz in the store.

I can buy organic, free-range eggs in the store for $3.49/dozen, or I can get them from a local farmer...also organic & free-range for $1.50/dozen. 

We didn't grow a garden this summer because we had just moved here.  In the past, though, we've grown most of our own produce & herbs.  We paid one time upfront for the wood & screws for the square foot boxes, & used left-over clothing line for the dividers.  We also bought the peat moss, vermiculite, & compost as well as heirloom seeds. From then on out, we made our own composte which refreshed the garden every year & saved our seeds so we didn't have to buy them again.

Even taking into account our upfront costs, our garden had paid for itself just a couple months after our first harvest as our grocery bill reduced from not having to buy produce.  Growing your own is the cheapest way to eat organic, local foods.

If you can't grow, buy local as much as possible.  Our farmer's market is really expensive as are regular grocery stores.  To get the best deals on produce, you've got to go directly to the farm.  Next...check sale ads & buy in season.  When there's a really good deal on something (like organic pears for $.47/lb), stock up!  Can, freeze, or dehydrate the surplus so you have that same cheap, organic, local produce later in the year when it's no longer in season.

Bottom line, organic eating CAN be more expensive, but it doesn't have to be!

Amy


ziff130
by on Oct. 2, 2010 at 8:04 AM

Just out of curiosity, why go to the grocery store every EIGHT days? It just seems like an odd number so I'm curious. It's not an argumentative question. I'm genuinely curious why 8. hehe! I go every Friday... it's my errand day so I go every 7 days.

Also, you've inspired me to make cloth napkins. I googled them and they are INCREDIBLY easy. :) I'm excited now. Everything else on the list I already do and I still feel that for our family of 5, $90/week is expensive -- at least more expensive than when we lived off junk (canned foods but I still made lots of things from scratch... just not healthy).

Quoting rkoloms:

I depends on how you eat. Three of us, plus extra teens, eat a most organic, whole foods based diet, and spend around $80 a week on groceries.

Here are my favorite tips:

Make at least some of your own cleaning products. This has the added bonus of bringing fewer toxins into your home

This is what we use for most cleaning (initially used as part of my daughter's 6th grade science fair project). It is cheap (my favorite) and non toxic.
¼ cup white vinegar
¾ cup warm tap water
1 tablespoon baking soda
10 drops of tea tree oil (antibacterial, antifungal, etc.)
2 drops oil of lavender essential oil (antiseptic and smells nice) 

Stop buying paper towels and napkins. Cloth napkins are more fun! Pick up cheap cotton towels at your favorite second hand shop. Save money and trees!!

Past the age of 2, the only beverage that humans need is water. Stop buying juice and sodas; buy milks only for cooking and cereal. You can liven up water with slices of fruits and vegetables; make ice cubes with blueberry eyeballs for the kids.

Replace meats with beans, lentils, tofu, seitan, etc. You can save even more money by using dried beans and lentils and making your own seitan.

Cook from scratch! Home cooked foods taste so much better than the nasty boxed stuff, and you will feel better because you are eating healthier foods. 

Replace simple grains (white flour, white rice, white pasta, etc.) with whole grains (brown rice, whole wheat pasta, whole grain breads, etc.). While whole grains may cost more, they have more nutrition and are more filling, so they really are the better value.

Frozen fruits and vegetables have a longer shelf life than fresh and retain their nutrition longer; they are often a better, less expensive option than fresh.

Once or twice a week have breakfast for dinner. Popular options at my house are: yogurt parfaits with frozen berries and whole grain cereal; veggies omelets with a bit of cheese and whole grain toast; whole grain pancakes with fruit.

Instead of baking a whole batch of cookies, make and freeze cookie dough balls. No one will be tempted to sneak a cookie (you know who you are) and when you do have cookies they will be fresh baked. 

Only go to the grocery store every 8 days. Before you shop, plan all of your meals and snacks for the next 8 days. Write your list, based on what you need to complete your meal plan. Pull any necessary coupons; eat before you go (never go to the grocery store hungry). Most important, buy only what is on your list. The specials at the store are not to save you money; they are to get you to buy items that you don't need. If you won't use it in 3 week, don't buy it!

I have a ton of recipes that are tasty, easy, healthy, family and budget friendly; send me a message offlist if you would like some.


rkoloms
by on Oct. 3, 2010 at 8:54 AM

The theory behind eight days is stretching your food budget for eight days instead of seven.

I buy groceries every two weeks, and produce every three or four days.

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