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Whole Body Vibration Machines

Posted by on May. 24, 2012 at 4:33 PM
  • 14 Replies


Is whole body vibration a good way to lose weight and improve fitness?

Answer

from Edward R. Laskowski, M.D.

Whole body vibration can offer some fitness and health benefits, but it's not clear if it's as good for you as regular exercise.

With whole body vibration, you stand, sit or lie on a machine with a vibrating platform. As the machine vibrates, it transmits energy to your body, forcing your muscles to contract and relax dozens of times each second. You may feel as if you're exerting yourself when you do whole body vibration. You may find a whole body vibration machine at a local gym, or you can even buy one for home use.

Advocates say that as little as 15 minutes a day of whole body vibration three times a week can aid weight loss, burn fat, improve flexibility, enhance blood flow, build strength and decrease the stress hormone cortisol.

But comprehensive research about whole body vibration is lacking. It's not yet clear if whole body vibration provides the same range of health benefits as exercise you actively engage in, such as walking, biking or swimming. Some research does show that whole body vibration may help improve muscle strength and that it may help with weight loss when you also cut back on calories.

Whole body vibration also may have a role beyond sports and fitness. Some research shows that whole body vibration, when performed correctly and under medical supervision when needed, can:

  • Reduce back pain
  • Improve balance in older adults
  • Reduce bone loss

Still, if you want to lose weight and improve fitness, enjoy a healthy diet and include physical activity in your daily routine. If you choose whole body vibration, remember to do aerobic and strength training activities as well. And because whole body vibration can be harmful in some situations, check with your doctor before using it, especially if you're pregnant or have any health problems.


Have any of you seen or tried one of these machines before?  Just saw it on a local show on tv.  My 19yo said it's the lazy person's workout...lol  I do agree with the article above.

       ***Corrie***



by on May. 24, 2012 at 4:33 PM
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Replies (1-10):
LindaClement
by Gold Member on May. 24, 2012 at 5:34 PM

Makes me laugh like crazy.

Of course not. It's not an aerobic workout, beyond a few improvements (in very weak people) in their very-small balance muscles, it can't increase muscle mass, and standing still 'reduces bone loss' in weight bearing bones... 

On the other hand, actually exercising for real increases bone mass, and muscle mass, and improves cardio endurance, balance, coordination, oxygen uptake and cell renewal rates...

I like that they said 'do aerobic and strength training as well' which, probably accounts for 100% of the 'benefits' they claim, without the expensive, annoyingly noisy maching.

cleanaturalady
by Kim on May. 24, 2012 at 7:45 PM
2 moms liked this

Is anyone else reminded of these machines of old?

  

chrisnjoesmom
by on May. 24, 2012 at 9:42 PM


Quoting cleanaturalady:

Is anyone else reminded of these machines of old?

That's exactly what I was thinking!


reneawesley
by on May. 24, 2012 at 10:40 PM

 That's the first thing I thought of.

Quoting cleanaturalady:

Is anyone else reminded of these machines of old?

 

e-doolittle
by Kelly on May. 24, 2012 at 11:39 PM
I remember these from a few years ago. It is something I consider when my chronic pain was so bad.
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mypbandj
by Jen on May. 25, 2012 at 1:00 AM

That is exactly what I was thinking of!! LMAO

DH's grandmother has one up in her attic.

Quoting cleanaturalady:

Is anyone else reminded of these machines of old?


darbyakeep45
by Darby on May. 25, 2012 at 7:11 AM
1 mom liked this

Totally agree here!

Quoting LindaClement:

Makes me laugh like crazy.

Of course not. It's not an aerobic workout, beyond a few improvements (in very weak people) in their very-small balance muscles, it can't increase muscle mass, and standing still 'reduces bone loss' in weight bearing bones... 

On the other hand, actually exercising for real increases bone mass, and muscle mass, and improves cardio endurance, balance, coordination, oxygen uptake and cell renewal rates...

I like that they said 'do aerobic and strength training as well' which, probably accounts for 100% of the 'benefits' they claim, without the expensive, annoyingly noisy maching.


mp3mom
by on May. 25, 2012 at 8:13 AM

Lol! I am now :)

Quoting cleanaturalady:

Is anyone else reminded of these machines of old?


AgentBrez
by on May. 25, 2012 at 8:15 AM
What is that? I've never seen those before!

Quoting cleanaturalady:

Is anyone else reminded of these machines of old?


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
cleanaturalady
by Kim on May. 25, 2012 at 9:23 AM


Quoting AgentBrez:

What is that? I've never seen those before!

Quoting cleanaturalady:

Is anyone else reminded of these machines of old?


You are probably too young to remember these, but they were very popular in the 50s-70s.  You would put the belt around you, and turn on the machine and it would vibrate and shake, supposedly shaking the weight off of you and firming up whatever area you had the belt on.  The first gym I joined, when I was 13 (1977) had a whole row of these machines along one wall.

  

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