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What kind of Orange Juice?

Posted by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 7:06 AM
  • 21 Replies

Do you drink?  If you drink it at all?  Please share:)  Thanks!

by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 7:06 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Amanda52007
by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 7:19 AM

I could drink OJ everyday. lol But I know how bad it is for you, so we only get Tropicana every 2 or 3 months. It's always a treat!

darbyakeep45
by Darby on Feb. 6, 2013 at 7:47 AM

Why is it bad for you?

Quoting Amanda52007:

I could drink OJ everyday. lol But I know how bad it is for you, so we only get Tropicana every 2 or 3 months. It's always a treat!


Amanda52007
by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 7:52 AM

The sugar and the process in making it...

Here it's talking about the sugar content.

This is talking about the process...it's actually quite gross...

(you can find the whole article HERE.)

Making OJ should be pretty simple. Pick oranges. Squeeze them. Put the juice in a carton and voilà!

But actually, there is an important stage in between that is an open secret in the OJ industry. After the oranges are squeezed, the juice is stored in giant holding tanks and, critically, the oxygen is removed from them. That essentially allows the liquid to keep (for up to a year) without spoiling– but that liquid that we think of as orange juice tastes nothing like the Tropicana OJ that comes out of the carton. (source)

In fact, it’s quite flavorless. So, the industry uses “flavor packs” to re-flavor the de-oxygenated orange juice:

When the juice is stripped of oxygen it is also stripped of flavor providing chemicals. Juice companies therefore hire flavor and fragrance companies, the same ones that formulate perfumes for Dior and Calvin Klein, to engineer flavor packs to add back to the juice to make it taste fresh. Flavor packs aren’t listed as an ingredient on the label because technically they are derived from orange essence and oil. Yet those in the industry will tell you that the flavor packs, whether made for reconstituted or pasteurized orange juice, resemble nothing found in nature. The packs added to juice earmarked for the North American market tend to contain high amounts of ethyl butyrate, a chemical in the fragrance of fresh squeezed orange juice that, juice companies have discovered, Americans favor. Mexicans and Brazilians have a different palate. Flavor packs fabricated for juice geared to these markets therefore highlight different chemicals, the decanals say, or terpene compounds such as valencine.

The formulas vary to give a brand’s trademark taste. If you’re discerning you may have noticed Minute Maid has a candy like orange flavor. That’s largely due to the flavor pack Coca-Cola has chosen for it. Some companies have even been known to request a flavor pack that mimics the taste of a popular competitor, creating a “hall of mirrors” of flavor packs. Despite the multiple interpretations of a freshly squeezed orange on the market, most flavor packs have a shared source of inspiration: a Florida Valencia orange in spring. (source)


Quoting darbyakeep45:

Why is it bad for you?

Quoting Amanda52007:

I could drink OJ everyday. lol But I know how bad it is for you, so we only get Tropicana every 2 or 3 months. It's always a treat!



mypbandj
by Jen on Feb. 6, 2013 at 7:52 AM
1 mom liked this
Dh is in charge of buying the OJ. I have no idea what brand though! LOL

I know he gets pulp free so the kids will drink it. I wouldn't mind the pulp though.

I rarely drink it. I prefer oranges to OJ. The juice, unless hand squeezed, just doesn't taste the same. So I'm not an OJ fan.
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darbyakeep45
by Darby on Feb. 6, 2013 at 7:54 AM

Wow!  Is there any kind of OJ that isn't like this?

Quoting Amanda52007:

The sugar and the process in making it...

Here it's talking about the sugar content.

This is talking about the process...it's actually quite gross...

(you can find the whole article HERE.)


Making OJ should be pretty simple. Pick oranges. Squeeze them. Put the juice in a carton and voilà!

But actually, there is an important stage in between that is an open secret in the OJ industry. After the oranges are squeezed, the juice is stored in giant holding tanks and, critically, the oxygen is removed from them. That essentially allows the liquid to keep (for up to a year) without spoiling– but that liquid that we think of as orange juice tastes nothing like the Tropicana OJ that comes out of the carton. (source)

In fact, it’s quite flavorless. So, the industry uses “flavor packs” to re-flavor the de-oxygenated orange juice:

When the juice is stripped of oxygen it is also stripped of flavor providing chemicals. Juice companies therefore hire flavor and fragrance companies, the same ones that formulate perfumes for Dior and Calvin Klein, to engineer flavor packs to add back to the juice to make it taste fresh. Flavor packs aren’t listed as an ingredient on the label because technically they are derived from orange essence and oil. Yet those in the industry will tell you that the flavor packs, whether made for reconstituted or pasteurized orange juice, resemble nothing found in nature. The packs added to juice earmarked for the North American market tend to contain high amounts of ethyl butyrate, a chemical in the fragrance of fresh squeezed orange juice that, juice companies have discovered, Americans favor. Mexicans and Brazilians have a different palate. Flavor packs fabricated for juice geared to these markets therefore highlight different chemicals, the decanals say, or terpene compounds such as valencine.

The formulas vary to give a brand’s trademark taste. If you’re discerning you may have noticed Minute Maid has a candy like orange flavor. That’s largely due to the flavor pack Coca-Cola has chosen for it. Some companies have even been known to request a flavor pack that mimics the taste of a popular competitor, creating a “hall of mirrors” of flavor packs. Despite the multiple interpretations of a freshly squeezed orange on the market, most flavor packs have a shared source of inspiration: a Florida Valencia orange in spring. (source)


Quoting darbyakeep45:

Why is it bad for you?

Quoting Amanda52007:

I could drink OJ everyday. lol But I know how bad it is for you, so we only get Tropicana every 2 or 3 months. It's always a treat!




Amanda52007
by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 7:56 AM

I'm not sure. If there is, we don't have it here. We don't have any health food stores near us though, so I don't know if any companies have any organic OJ stuff. 

Quoting darbyakeep45:

Wow!  Is there any kind of OJ that isn't like this?

Quoting Amanda52007:

The sugar and the process in making it...

Here it's talking about the sugar content.

This is talking about the process...it's actually quite gross...

(you can find the whole article HERE.)


Making OJ should be pretty simple. Pick oranges. Squeeze them. Put the juice in a carton and voilà!

But actually, there is an important stage in between that is an open secret in the OJ industry. After the oranges are squeezed, the juice is stored in giant holding tanks and, critically, the oxygen is removed from them. That essentially allows the liquid to keep (for up to a year) without spoiling– but that liquid that we think of as orange juice tastes nothing like the Tropicana OJ that comes out of the carton. (source)

In fact, it’s quite flavorless. So, the industry uses “flavor packs” to re-flavor the de-oxygenated orange juice:

When the juice is stripped of oxygen it is also stripped of flavor providing chemicals. Juice companies therefore hire flavor and fragrance companies, the same ones that formulate perfumes for Dior and Calvin Klein, to engineer flavor packs to add back to the juice to make it taste fresh. Flavor packs aren’t listed as an ingredient on the label because technically they are derived from orange essence and oil. Yet those in the industry will tell you that the flavor packs, whether made for reconstituted or pasteurized orange juice, resemble nothing found in nature. The packs added to juice earmarked for the North American market tend to contain high amounts of ethyl butyrate, a chemical in the fragrance of fresh squeezed orange juice that, juice companies have discovered, Americans favor. Mexicans and Brazilians have a different palate. Flavor packs fabricated for juice geared to these markets therefore highlight different chemicals, the decanals say, or terpene compounds such as valencine.

The formulas vary to give a brand’s trademark taste. If you’re discerning you may have noticed Minute Maid has a candy like orange flavor. That’s largely due to the flavor pack Coca-Cola has chosen for it. Some companies have even been known to request a flavor pack that mimics the taste of a popular competitor, creating a “hall of mirrors” of flavor packs. Despite the multiple interpretations of a freshly squeezed orange on the market, most flavor packs have a shared source of inspiration: a Florida Valencia orange in spring. (source)


Quoting darbyakeep45:

Why is it bad for you?

Quoting Amanda52007:

I could drink OJ everyday. lol But I know how bad it is for you, so we only get Tropicana every 2 or 3 months. It's always a treat!





LntLckrsCmQut
by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 2:33 PM

We only drink freshly juiced orange juice from home.

rockinmomto2
by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 2:35 PM

I rarely buy oj. If I do, it's the pulpy kind that doesn't have any added sugar or anything. Just the juice.

Alyson121
by Alyson on Feb. 6, 2013 at 2:43 PM

We buy Columbia Gorge brand or Evolution Brand.  They both sell them in half gallon sizes.Sometimes hubby will buy the fresh pressed juices from some of the smaller local markets, but those don't have a name since they press it on site.

http://www.cogojuice.com/_images/photos/OJ.jpghttp://www.evolutionfresh.com/assets/product-images/fruit-juices.jpg

Alyson121
by Alyson on Feb. 6, 2013 at 2:46 PM
1 mom liked this

Yes there is but you'd have to find out where it is locally.

Quoting darbyakeep45:

Wow!  Is there any kind of OJ that isn't like this?

Quoting Amanda52007:

The sugar and the process in making it...

Here it's talking about the sugar content.

This is talking about the process...it's actually quite gross...

(you can find the whole article HERE.)


Making OJ should be pretty simple. Pick oranges. Squeeze them. Put the juice in a carton and voilà!

But actually, there is an important stage in between that is an open secret in the OJ industry. After the oranges are squeezed, the juice is stored in giant holding tanks and, critically, the oxygen is removed from them. That essentially allows the liquid to keep (for up to a year) without spoiling– but that liquid that we think of as orange juice tastes nothing like the Tropicana OJ that comes out of the carton. (source)

In fact, it’s quite flavorless. So, the industry uses “flavor packs” to re-flavor the de-oxygenated orange juice:

When the juice is stripped of oxygen it is also stripped of flavor providing chemicals. Juice companies therefore hire flavor and fragrance companies, the same ones that formulate perfumes for Dior and Calvin Klein, to engineer flavor packs to add back to the juice to make it taste fresh. Flavor packs aren’t listed as an ingredient on the label because technically they are derived from orange essence and oil. Yet those in the industry will tell you that the flavor packs, whether made for reconstituted or pasteurized orange juice, resemble nothing found in nature. The packs added to juice earmarked for the North American market tend to contain high amounts of ethyl butyrate, a chemical in the fragrance of fresh squeezed orange juice that, juice companies have discovered, Americans favor. Mexicans and Brazilians have a different palate. Flavor packs fabricated for juice geared to these markets therefore highlight different chemicals, the decanals say, or terpene compounds such as valencine.

The formulas vary to give a brand’s trademark taste. If you’re discerning you may have noticed Minute Maid has a candy like orange flavor. That’s largely due to the flavor pack Coca-Cola has chosen for it. Some companies have even been known to request a flavor pack that mimics the taste of a popular competitor, creating a “hall of mirrors” of flavor packs. Despite the multiple interpretations of a freshly squeezed orange on the market, most flavor packs have a shared source of inspiration: a Florida Valencia orange in spring. (source)


Quoting darbyakeep45:

Why is it bad for you?

Quoting Amanda52007:

I could drink OJ everyday. lol But I know how bad it is for you, so we only get Tropicana every 2 or 3 months. It's always a treat!





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