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Kids' Health Kids' Health

Meals for Little One

Posted by on Sep. 21, 2012 at 8:46 PM
  • 12 Replies

I have a one year old little girl, she's far from picky but I always seem to struggle to find the right balance of food groups for her meals. Dinner is easy since she eats with us. However lunch and breakfast its just us two and I don't want to do a whole meal because truthfully I don't eat much I just snack throughout the day. Usually she has dry cereal, fruit, and a glass of milk. Then snack she has yogurt, or cheese or something like that. Lunch is bologne/hotdog/chicken nuggets, fruit, veggie, and a glass of juice. Snack then is something like cookies or chips. Then dinner is whatever we have. What do you do for your little ones? What else would you suggest adding? Preferably something quick and easy. 

by on Sep. 21, 2012 at 8:46 PM
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Replies (1-10):
TerriC
by on Sep. 21, 2012 at 8:49 PM
Have her try hummus with veggies or crackers. Frozen grapes, cheese cubes, wraps with cream cheese and turkey etc.
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PrincessZ20
by on Sep. 21, 2012 at 10:36 PM

Tortilla spread with cream cheese or hummus, then add misc veggies and/or lunchmeat, roll, and slice! 

It's fine for her to snack with you - offer fruits and vegetables, cheese, yogurt, etc - just like you're offering now!

new_mom808
by Andrea on Sep. 21, 2012 at 11:51 PM

 She would probably also prefer to snack throughout the day. I find that if I leave a small plate of fresh, raw veggies and some ranch or hummus for dipping just out on the table or counter, they disappear pretty quickly.
We also look for little ways to add veggies into favorites. Macaroni and cheese and peas, smoothies, spinach on his grilled cheese are all favorites.

frndlyfn
by on Sep. 22, 2012 at 12:30 AM

Just a sec. I will pull up what is recommended for this age.

frndlyfn
by on Sep. 22, 2012 at 12:31 AM

Age: 12 to 24 months

Signs of readiness

  • Can start to use a spoon (though proficiency will take a while!)

What to feed

  • Whole milk
  • Other dairy (soft pasteurized cheese, full-fat yogurt and cottage cheese)
  • Same food as rest of family, mashed or chopped into bite-size pieces
  • Iron-fortified cereals (rice, barley, wheat, oats, mixed cereals)
  • Other grains (whole wheat bread, pasta, rice)
  • Fruits: melon, papaya, apricot, grapefruit
  • Vegetables: broccoli and cauliflower "trees", cooked until soft
  • Protein (eggs; cut-up or ground meat or poultry; boneless fish; tofu; beans; thinly spread smooth peanut butter)
  • Citrus and non-citrus juice
  • Honey is now okay

How much per day

  • 2 cups dairy (1 cup milk or yogurt, 1 cup = 1 1/2 ounces natural cheese or 2 ounces processed cheese)
  • 3 ounces grains, preferably half of them whole grains (1 ounce = 1/3 cup cold cereal, 1/4 cup pasta or rice, 1 slice bread)
  • 1 cup fruit (fresh, frozen, canned and/or 100 percent juice) Emphasize whole fruits rather than juice.
  • 1 cup vegetables (Serve vegetables that are cut in small pieces and well cooked to prevent choking.)
  • 2 ounces protein (1 ounce = one slice of sandwich meat, about 1/3 of a chicken breast half, 1/4 can of tuna, 1/4 cup cooked dry beans, or 1 egg)

Feeding tips

  • Experts used to say you shouldn't give young children eggs, fish, or peanut products because the child might develop a food allergy. But the latest research from the American Academy of Pediatrics found there's no evidence that babies develop allergies from the early introduction of these foods. Still, some doctors recommend caution when it comes to introducing foods. If you're concerned that your child might have an allergy to certain foods, introduce them one by one and keep an eye out for an allergic reaction.
  • Choking is still a danger. Learn more about foods to watch out for.
frndlyfn
by on Sep. 22, 2012 at 12:31 AM

Age: 24 to 36 months

Signs of readiness

  • Self-feeding
  • Eagerness to make own food choices

What to feed

  • Low-fat milk (It's okay to switch to low-fat or nonfat milk once your child is older than 2, but check with your child's doctor if you have questions.)
  • Other dairy (diced or grated cheese; low-fat yogurt, cottage cheese, pudding)
  • Iron-fortified cereals (rice, barley, wheat, oats, mixed cereals)
  • Other grains (whole wheat bread and crackers, cut-up bagels, pretzels, rice cakes, ready-to-eat cereal, pasta, rice)
  • Fruits, sliced fresh or canned
  • Dried fruit, soaked until soft so it won't pose a choking hazard (apples, apricots, peaches, pears, dates, pitted prunes)
  • Vegetables, cooked and cut up
  • Protein (eggs; cut-up or ground meat or poultry; boneless fish; tofu; beans; smooth peanut butter)
  • Combo foods like macaroni and cheese, casseroles
  • Fruit and vegetable juices

How much per day

One serving for a child this age is about a quarter the size of an adult serving.

  • 2 cups dairy (1 cup milk or yogurt; 1 cup = 1 1/2 ounces natural cheese or 2 ounces processed cheese)
  • 4-5 ounces grains (1 ounce = 1 slice of bread; 1/3 cup ready-to-eat cereal, or 1/4 cup of cooked rice, cooked pasta, or cooked cereal)
  • 1 to 1 1/2 cups fruit (fresh, frozen, canned, dried and/or 100 percent juice) Emphasize whole fruits rather than juice.
  • 1 1/2 cups vegetables
  • 3 to 4 ounces protein (1 ounce of meat, poultry, or fish; 1/4 cup cooked dry beans; or 1 egg)

Feeding tips

  • Experts used to say you shouldn't give young children eggs, fish, or peanut products because the child might develop a food allergy. But the latest research from the American Academy of Pediatrics found there's no evidence that babies develop allergies from the early introduction of these foods. Still, some doctors recommend caution when it comes to introducing foods. If you're concerned that your child might have an allergy to certain foods, introduce them one by one and keep an eye out for an allergic reaction.
  • Choking is still a danger. Learn more about foods to watch out for.

Your child may seem to eat less than before – that's perfectly normal at this stage. If you wonder whether your child is getting enough calories, use this guideline: The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children get about 40 calories a day for every inch of height.

Finally, if you're a vegan or vegetarian, you can still provide your infant or toddler with everything she needs. The American Dietetic Association and American Academy of Pediatrics agree that well-planned vegetarian and vegan diets are fine for infants and toddlers. Just pay attention to make sure your child gets plenty of the following nutrients:

  • Vitamin B12: Vegetarians can get this nutrient from milk products and eggs; vegans can use fortified soy or rice beverages, cereals, and meat substitutes.
  • Vitamin D: Breastfed babies should get an additional 400 IU per day through a vitamin supplement or, after 1 year of age, from fortified cow or soy milk.
  • Calcium: Vegan babies may need calcium-fortified foods, beverages, or supplements. Check with a dietitian or your doctor if you're not sure.
  • Iron: Found in iron-fortified cereal or supplements.
  • Protein: Vegans can find plant proteins in beans, cereals, and fortified soy milk. Vegetarians can add in protein from yogurt and eggs.
  • Fiber: Good sources of fiber include whole grain breads, fortified cereals, and pastas, and higher-fat plant foods like sunflower butter and avocados.
JaxMomma78
by on Sep. 22, 2012 at 2:08 AM
Just watch the carbs. Snacks like goldfish, cheerios, crackers tend to be fed a bit too often. Just be aware of that.
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mommy425906
by on Sep. 22, 2012 at 2:34 AM

You are awesome! Thank you for posting all that! I had almost the exact same question regarding my 1 yr old DD. 

Quoting frndlyfn:

Age: 24 to 36 months

Signs of readiness

  • Self-feeding
  • Eagerness to make own food choices

What to feed

  • Low-fat milk (It's okay to switch to low-fat or nonfat milk once your child is older than 2, but check with your child's doctor if you have questions.)
  • Other dairy (diced or grated cheese; low-fat yogurt, cottage cheese, pudding)
  • Iron-fortified cereals (rice, barley, wheat, oats, mixed cereals)
  • Other grains (whole wheat bread and crackers, cut-up bagels, pretzels, rice cakes, ready-to-eat cereal, pasta, rice)
  • Fruits, sliced fresh or canned
  • Dried fruit, soaked until soft so it won't pose a choking hazard (apples, apricots, peaches, pears, dates, pitted prunes)
  • Vegetables, cooked and cut up
  • Protein (eggs; cut-up or ground meat or poultry; boneless fish; tofu; beans; smooth peanut butter)
  • Combo foods like macaroni and cheese, casseroles
  • Fruit and vegetable juices

How much per day

One serving for a child this age is about a quarter the size of an adult serving.

  • 2 cups dairy (1 cup milk or yogurt; 1 cup = 1 1/2 ounces natural cheese or 2 ounces processed cheese)
  • 4-5 ounces grains (1 ounce = 1 slice of bread; 1/3 cup ready-to-eat cereal, or 1/4 cup of cooked rice, cooked pasta, or cooked cereal)
  • 1 to 1 1/2 cups fruit (fresh, frozen, canned, dried and/or 100 percent juice) Emphasize whole fruits rather than juice.
  • 1 1/2 cups vegetables
  • 3 to 4 ounces protein (1 ounce of meat, poultry, or fish; 1/4 cup cooked dry beans; or 1 egg)

Feeding tips

  • Experts used to say you shouldn't give young children eggs, fish, or peanut products because the child might develop a food allergy. But the latest research from the American Academy of Pediatrics found there's no evidence that babies develop allergies from the early introduction of these foods. Still, some doctors recommend caution when it comes to introducing foods. If you're concerned that your child might have an allergy to certain foods, introduce them one by one and keep an eye out for an allergic reaction.
  • Choking is still a danger. Learn more about foods to watch out for.

Your child may seem to eat less than before – that's perfectly normal at this stage. If you wonder whether your child is getting enough calories, use this guideline: The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children get about 40 calories a day for every inch of height.

Finally, if you're a vegan or vegetarian, you can still provide your infant or toddler with everything she needs. The American Dietetic Association and American Academy of Pediatrics agree that well-planned vegetarian and vegan diets are fine for infants and toddlers. Just pay attention to make sure your child gets plenty of the following nutrients:

  • Vitamin B12: Vegetarians can get this nutrient from milk products and eggs; vegans can use fortified soy or rice beverages, cereals, and meat substitutes.
  • Vitamin D: Breastfed babies should get an additional 400 IU per day through a vitamin supplement or, after 1 year of age, from fortified cow or soy milk.
  • Calcium: Vegan babies may need calcium-fortified foods, beverages, or supplements. Check with a dietitian or your doctor if you're not sure.
  • Iron: Found in iron-fortified cereal or supplements.
  • Protein: Vegans can find plant proteins in beans, cereals, and fortified soy milk. Vegetarians can add in protein from yogurt and eggs.
  • Fiber: Good sources of fiber include whole grain breads, fortified cereals, and pastas, and higher-fat plant foods like sunflower butter and avocados.


frndlyfn
by on Sep. 22, 2012 at 2:52 AM

YW   I had posted the 12-24 month one as well.  These guidelines really helped me with knowing how much to give dd for meals and snacks.

Quoting mommy425906:

You are awesome! Thank you for posting all that! I had almost the exact same question regarding my 1 yr old DD. 

Quoting frndlyfn:

Age: 24 to 36 months

Signs of readiness

  • Self-feeding
  • Eagerness to make own food choices


TigerofMu
by Sonja on Sep. 22, 2012 at 9:39 AM

I think that sounds okay.  What do you snack on through the day?  

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