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Kids' Health Kids' Health

Have you heard that APA has officially dropped Aspergers from their manual?  Most people close to the subject have been expecting this change for a while, but it is now official.

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-204_162-57556754/aspergers-syndrome-dropped-from-american-psychiatric-association-manual/

"The familiar "Asperger's," along with some similar disorders, will be lumped together under autism spectrum disorder, "to help more accurately and consistently diagnose children with autism," the APA said in a statement.

Other changes include entries for new disorders such as "hoarding disorder" or "disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD)," the latter characterized by abnormally bad and frequent temper tantrums. "Dyslexia" and other learning disorders that some feared would be removed from the manual, remained."

Do you know anyone previously diagnosed with Aspergers?  Do you fear that these changes will affect their care?

by on Dec. 4, 2012 at 12:51 AM
Replies (11-20):
lasombrs
by on Dec. 5, 2012 at 7:10 AM

hopefully it will improve care for others. My son has autism, but not this high functioning form so it does not effect him but i think its a good thing


AnnaNonamus
by on Dec. 5, 2012 at 7:34 AM

My DD11 was dx 4 years ago. My DS14 was dx 3 years ago. 

kris0921
by on Dec. 5, 2012 at 7:35 AM

My nephew is diagnosed with Aspergers. I am curious to see how treatment and care will change. I hope for the better, my sister has been through so much sine he was diagnosed 2 years ago with it.

Mistygirl
by on Dec. 5, 2012 at 8:10 AM

if anything this will help provide the therapy that was hard to get before the change. This may actually help. Two out of three of my children have classic autism and a couple of friends I have met along the way have children with aspergers, sadly my children were able to get some therapies that they could not get. I really hope this change helps.

OceanGoddess
by on Dec. 5, 2012 at 8:17 AM
I knew this was happening for a while. It will change the childrens care but in a good way because with a "autism" dx you have more options and services offered to you. At least that is how it works where I live (Maine).
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OceanGoddess
by on Dec. 5, 2012 at 8:19 AM
???

Quoting ZakkarysMom:

I never knew hoarding was an actual disorder..
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MrS.GiFFord
by on Dec. 5, 2012 at 9:03 AM

I love your sons hair!

Quoting lasombrs:

hopefully it will improve care for others. My son has autism, but not this high functioning form so it does not effect him but i think its a good thing


Mommavieve
by on Dec. 5, 2012 at 9:04 AM
From what I understand, it's a form of OCD.

Quoting ZakkarysMom:

I never knew hoarding was an actual disorder..
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A_McCool
by on Dec. 5, 2012 at 9:22 AM
2 moms liked this

It is suspected that I have Asperger's Syndrome/High functioning Autism, but I do not have an official diagnosis. I think it a good thing; I think it will offer more opportunities for help for kids diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome.  I think the main thing about the change is the streamlining of the diagnostic terminology.   I like the new criteria, and I think it will better identify people on the ASD spectrum.

Here is the new criteria.

American Psychiatric Association DSM-5 Development

(Retrieved from www.dsm5.org)

Autism Spectrum Disorder

Must meet criteria A, B, C, and D:

A. Persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction across contexts, not accounted for by general developmental delays, and manifest by all 3 of the following:

1. Deficits in social-emotional reciprocity; ranging from abnormal social approach and failure of normal back and forth conversation through reduced sharing of interests, emotions, and affect and response to total lack of initiation of social interaction,
2. Deficits in nonverbal communicative behaviors used for social interaction; ranging from poorly integrated- verbal and nonverbal communication, through abnormalities in eye contact and body-language, or deficits in understanding and use of nonverbal communication, to total lack of facial expression or gestures.
3. Deficits in developing and maintaining relationships, appropriate to developmental level (beyond those with caregivers); ranging from difficulties adjusting behavior to suit different social contexts through difficulties in sharing imaginative play and  in making friends  to an apparent absence of interest in people

B. Restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities as manifested by at least two of the following:

1. Stereotyped or repetitive speech, motor movements, or use of objects; (such as simple motor stereotypies, echolalia, repetitive use of objects, or idiosyncratic phrases). 
2. Excessive adherence to routines, ritualized patterns of verbal or nonverbal behavior, or excessive resistance to change; (such as motoric rituals, insistence on same route or food, repetitive questioning or extreme distress at small changes).
3. Highly restricted, fixated interests that are abnormal in intensity or focus; (such as strong attachment to or preoccupation with unusual objects, excessively circumscribed or perseverative interests).
4. Hyper- or hypo-reactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory aspects of environment; (such as apparent indifference to pain/heat/cold, adverse response to specific sounds or textures, excessive smelling or touching of objects, fascination with lights or spinning objects).

C.    Symptoms must be present in early childhood (but may not become fully manifest until social demands exceed limited capacities)

D.    Symptoms together limit and impair everyday functioning. 

Severity Levels for ASD

Severity Level for ASD

Social Communication

Restricted Interests & repetitive behaviors

Level 3 

‘Requiring very substantial support’

Severe deficits in verbal and nonverbal social communication skills cause severe impairments in functioning; very limited initiation of social interactions and minimal response to social overtures from others.  

Preoccupations, fixated rituals and/or repetitive behaviors markedly interfere with functioning in all spheres.  Marked distress when rituals or routines are interrupted; very difficult to redirect from fixated interest or returns to it quickly.

Level 2 

‘Requiring substantial support’

Marked deficits in verbal and nonverbal social communication skills; social impairments apparent even with supports in place; limited initiation of social interactions and reduced or abnormal response to social overtures from others.

RRBs and/or preoccupations or fixated interests appear frequently enough to be obvious to the casual observer and interfere with functioning in a variety of contexts.  Distress or frustration is apparent when RRB’s are interrupted; difficult to redirect from fixated interest.

Level 1

‘Requiring support’

Without supports in place, deficits in social communication cause noticeable impairments.  Has difficulty initiating social interactions and demonstrates clear examples of atypical or unsuccessful responses to social overtures of others.  May appear to have decreased interest in social interactions. 

Rituals and repetitive behaviors (RRB’s) cause significant interference with functioning in one or more contexts.  Resists attempts by others to interrupt RRB’s or to be redirected from fixated intere

SugarMamaO76
by on Dec. 5, 2012 at 9:24 AM
my cousin has this and she does fine I dont know ifit will affect her care or not.
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