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3yr old losing hair

Posted by on Apr. 25, 2013 at 4:18 PM
  • 11 Replies

I have identical twin daughters who turned 3 in January. One of them plays with her hair, but doesn't pull it out. Her hair is falling out. I find it EVERYWHERE! Sometimes in big clumps. It's very concerning. The doctor gave us some medicine after we saw what looked like cradle cap on her scalp. It was a shampoo to wash her hair with a few times a week. We also got a cream to use. The cradle cap stuff has since went away, but her hair is still falling out. She is super thin on top, kind of like i've seen some elderly ladies. Ugh. Now we have to do bloodwork on her thyroid and see if there are any problems there. She broke her leg back in September last year and we have read that hairloss can come about 6mo after a traumatic event. I don't know if that would count and its frustrating that if that is what is happening, we really can't be sure. Curious if any one has had this problem? I'm worried what it could be if it isn't the thyroid.

by on Apr. 25, 2013 at 4:18 PM
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Replies (1-10):
frndlyfn
by Bronze Member on Apr. 25, 2013 at 5:05 PM

It could be many things.  Hopefully the doctor can figure it out.

PrincessZ20
by on Apr. 25, 2013 at 5:42 PM

I don't have any experience with it, but I hope you get some answers! 

TigerofMu
by Sonja on Apr. 25, 2013 at 8:01 PM

I was going to ask about her thyroid, but it looks as though you're already checking on this. 

Cafe AmyS
by Head Admin on Apr. 26, 2013 at 3:18 PM

It could be related to her broken leg, but I'm not sure.  I think it's a good thing that the doctors want to run tests.

new_mom808
by Andrea on Apr. 27, 2013 at 6:02 PM

Has she been under any anstesia (sp) recently?
Let us know how the thyroid tests go.

karamille
by on May. 5, 2013 at 7:22 PM
1 mom liked this

Thyroid is a definite to check, but also have them check her iron level.   Also... increase her protein intake and make sure she's taking a multi-vitamin with all the Bs - B6, B12, thiamine, niacin, etc...  

MusherMaggie
by Bronze Member on May. 6, 2013 at 12:54 PM
I would say you need to look into nutritional gaps as well--D3 deficiency which inhibits calcium absorption, for one.
jakesgal88
by on May. 8, 2013 at 9:11 PM

Her thyroid results came back "normal"... they said some of the numbers were a teensy bit out of range but that it "could be normal since she's still growing". Our actual doctor wasn't in, but the doctor that shares the office with him looked at the results. Our doctor won't be back until the 17th. She did have low iron, then we got some iron pills and it went way too high so he said to stop the iron pills. I will definitely have the doctor check the other vitamins. The vitamin D deficiency could be something to look into. Her brother simply picked her up and dropped her on a carpeted floor when she fractured her leg. He's only 7, so he's not very tall. Little kids' bones are supposed to be harder to break, so maybe that has some relation there. She plays with her hair as well, but she's not pulling it out... it's just helping it fall out faster I think. Frustrating. I just found some big clumps today. Surprised she has any left at this point.

karamille
by on May. 10, 2013 at 12:26 AM

Did anything stressful happen to her 3-4 months ago?  High fever, surgery move to a new house, etc...?  

Stress can cause delayed hair loss.  This happened to me last year ( I had 3 surgeries in 3 months) and my hair is just now starting to thicken up.  Here's some info on it.  


Telogen effluvium. Telogen effluvium is a condition in which a sudden or severe stress -- such as extremely high fever, surgery under general anesthesia, the death of a loved one, a severe injury, or the use of certain prescription medications -- interrupts the normal cycle of hair growth. The hair follicles stop growing prematurely and enter a resting phase (called the telogen phase). Between six and 16 weeks later, hair sheds excessively, leading to partial or complete baldness.

There are no conclusive tests to diagnose telogen effluvium; there is also no treatment for it. However, once the stressful event is over, full hair growth usually returns within six months to a year.

JoJoBean8
by on May. 10, 2013 at 12:29 AM
That happened to my dd. Went on for years. I took her to ever specialist i could find. Finally we found out she has food allergies. Her hair is now finally growing back.
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