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Running

Posted by on Mar. 2, 2011 at 4:15 PM
  • 15 Replies

After 2 miles of walking, my groin/very top of my thigh really starts to hurt. Do you think the same thing will happen with jogging/running? And is running GOOD or BAD on the knees? 

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by on Mar. 2, 2011 at 4:15 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Natalie5
by on Mar. 2, 2011 at 4:19 PM
I am not a runner, but have been told it is bad for the joints. Here's a bump for someone who runs...
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Nykkii
by on Mar. 2, 2011 at 5:58 PM
I don't think running is good for the knees, but its better than exercises involving jumping.
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runner-mom
by on Mar. 2, 2011 at 6:20 PM


Quoting Nykkii:

I don't think running is good for the knees, but its better than exercises involving jumping.

This is the biggest misconception out there about running.  Running, and any impact exercise, is infact, GOOD for your knees. It promotes blood flow and regeneration of the joints.  What often  HURTS people is the extra weight that stresses the joints. But, over time, MOST people will tell you that as they continue running, they strengthen their ligaments , lose the weight, and knee pain goes away.

From http://www.runnersworld.com/

Weighing In on Knee Pain

The number one risk factor for OA is excess body fat--a problem most runners don't have. Sedentary, overweight people are 45 percent more likely to develop OA than those who are active. "The more you weigh, the more pressure is placed on the joints, which seems to accelerate the breakdown of cartilage," says Patience White, M.D., chief public health officer for the Arthritis Foundation. Since losing weight is one of the best ways to prevent OA (losing 10 pounds can take about 45 pounds of pressure off the knee), and running is one of the most effective calorie burners, hopping on the treadmill for a tempo session could help you sidestep joint issues.

But running does more than just lighten the body's load. "Aerobic exercise improves most body functions--including joint health," says James Fries, M.D., professor of medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. When you exercise, the cartilage in your hips, knees, and ankles compresses and expands. This draws in oxygen and flushes out waste products, nourishing and keeping the cartilage healthy. "Without exercise, cartilage cells get weak and sick," he says.

Furthermore, running strengthens the ligaments that help support joints, making them more stable and less susceptible to sprains and strains, which can damage cartilage and eventually lead to OA.

In 2006, Dr. Fries presented research that compared rates of OA-related disabilities between 539 runners and 423 nonrunners over a 21-year period. At the follow-up exam, researchers found that the nonrunners were worse for wear--their increase in disabilities was twice that of the runners.

The runners in Dr. Fries's study averaged about 60 minutes of running five days a week. But even higher-mileage runners don't seem to risk bad knees. A 2006 study conducted at Germany's University of Heidelberg looked at the incidence of OA among elite marathon runners. After comparing 20 former elite German marathoners with a control group of nonrunners of the same age, gender, and body mass index, the researchers found that the marathoners did not have a higher risk of OA of the knee.


            
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runner-mom
by on Mar. 2, 2011 at 6:23 PM

P.S the top of your thight/groin is often referred to as your "hip flexors".   http://www.abc-of-fitness.com/leg-stretch/hip-flexor-stretch.asp

KMO777
by on Mar. 2, 2011 at 6:34 PM

Running is not good for the knees.  I've also heard that running isn't good for the female organs. 

~Kelly

BrownEyedGirl86
by Bronze Member on Mar. 2, 2011 at 6:35 PM

 i am not a avid runner but i dont' have the best knees but when i do run it feels goodd

runner-mom
by on Mar. 2, 2011 at 6:35 PM


Quoting KMO777:

Running is not good for the knees.  I've also heard that running isn't good for the female organs. 

~Kelly

why on earth?  Read what I posted above. And why is it bad for the female organs? I've taken many an exercise physiology class and never heard such a thing.

            
Run Like a MOM!!                        my blog               Cafemom Healthy Moms

KMO777
by on Mar. 2, 2011 at 6:35 PM


Quoting runner-mom:

 

Quoting Nykkii:

I don't think running is good for the knees, but its better than exercises involving jumping.

This is the biggest misconception out there about running.  Running, and any impact exercise, is infact, GOOD for your knees. It promotes blood flow and regeneration of the joints.  What often  HURTS people is the extra weight that stresses the joints. But, over time, MOST people will tell you that as they continue running, they strengthen their ligaments , lose the weight, and knee pain goes away.

From http://www.runnersworld.com/

Weighing In on Knee Pain

The number one risk factor for OA is excess body fat--a problem most runners don't have. Sedentary, overweight people are 45 percent more likely to develop OA than those who are active. "The more you weigh, the more pressure is placed on the joints, which seems to accelerate the breakdown of cartilage," says Patience White, M.D., chief public health officer for the Arthritis Foundation. Since losing weight is one of the best ways to prevent OA (losing 10 pounds can take about 45 pounds of pressure off the knee), and running is one of the most effective calorie burners, hopping on the treadmill for a tempo session could help you sidestep joint issues.

But running does more than just lighten the body's load. "Aerobic exercise improves most body functions--including joint health," says James Fries, M.D., professor of medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. When you exercise, the cartilage in your hips, knees, and ankles compresses and expands. This draws in oxygen and flushes out waste products, nourishing and keeping the cartilage healthy. "Without exercise, cartilage cells get weak and sick," he says.

Furthermore, running strengthens the ligaments that help support joints, making them more stable and less susceptible to sprains and strains, which can damage cartilage and eventually lead to OA.

In 2006, Dr. Fries presented research that compared rates of OA-related disabilities between 539 runners and 423 nonrunners over a 21-year period. At the follow-up exam, researchers found that the nonrunners were worse for wear--their increase in disabilities was twice that of the runners.

The runners in Dr. Fries's study averaged about 60 minutes of running five days a week. But even higher-mileage runners don't seem to risk bad knees. A 2006 study conducted at Germany's University of Heidelberg looked at the incidence of OA among elite marathon runners. After comparing 20 former elite German marathoners with a control group of nonrunners of the same age, gender, and body mass index, the researchers found that the marathoners did not have a higher risk of OA of the knee.


I disagree with this.  I ran in high school.  I was far from overweight.  It ruined my knees.

~Kelly

runner-mom
by on Mar. 2, 2011 at 6:38 PM


Quoting KMO777:

 

Quoting runner-mom:

 

Quoting Nykkii:

I don't think running is good for the knees, but its better than exercises involving jumping.

This is the biggest misconception out there about running.  Running, and any impact exercise, is infact, GOOD for your knees. It promotes blood flow and regeneration of the joints.  What often  HURTS people is the extra weight that stresses the joints. But, over time, MOST people will tell you that as they continue running, they strengthen their ligaments , lose the weight, and knee pain goes away.

From http://www.runnersworld.com/

Weighing In on Knee Pain

The number one risk factor for OA is excess body fat--a problem most runners don't have. Sedentary, overweight people are 45 percent more likely to develop OA than those who are active. "The more you weigh, the more pressure is placed on the joints, which seems to accelerate the breakdown of cartilage," says Patience White, M.D., chief public health officer for the Arthritis Foundation. Since losing weight is one of the best ways to prevent OA (losing 10 pounds can take about 45 pounds of pressure off the knee), and running is one of the most effective calorie burners, hopping on the treadmill for a tempo session could help you sidestep joint issues.

But running does more than just lighten the body's load. "Aerobic exercise improves most body functions--including joint health," says James Fries, M.D., professor of medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. When you exercise, the cartilage in your hips, knees, and ankles compresses and expands. This draws in oxygen and flushes out waste products, nourishing and keeping the cartilage healthy. "Without exercise, cartilage cells get weak and sick," he says.

Furthermore, running strengthens the ligaments that help support joints, making them more stable and less susceptible to sprains and strains, which can damage cartilage and eventually lead to OA.

In 2006, Dr. Fries presented research that compared rates of OA-related disabilities between 539 runners and 423 nonrunners over a 21-year period. At the follow-up exam, researchers found that the nonrunners were worse for wear--their increase in disabilities was twice that of the runners.

The runners in Dr. Fries's study averaged about 60 minutes of running five days a week. But even higher-mileage runners don't seem to risk bad knees. A 2006 study conducted at Germany's University of Heidelberg looked at the incidence of OA among elite marathon runners. After comparing 20 former elite German marathoners with a control group of nonrunners of the same age, gender, and body mass index, the researchers found that the marathoners did not have a higher risk of OA of the knee.


I disagree with this.  I ran in high school.  I was far from overweight.  It ruined my knees.

~Kelly

I'm sorry to hear that.  But science says that for the most part, it is true.  I also ran in high school. I'm 29 and running still. Full marathon last saturday (2/19....that was my 5th) and a half marathon this past sunday. My knees are great!

            
Run Like a MOM!!                        my blog               Cafemom Healthy Moms

i.heart.rachel
by on Mar. 2, 2011 at 6:48 PM

My knees are in bad shape. They have been for 10+ years, even before I was overweight. When I do any exercises that involve jumping (jumping rope. jumping jacks), I can't walk the next day. That is why I was asking. If running is going to do the same thing, I just can't do it.

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