Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Weight Loss, Fitness & Health Weight Loss, Fitness & Health

Muscle weight?

Posted by on May. 14, 2013 at 6:19 PM
  • 18 Replies
I've been seeing a personal trainer for almost three months now. I've been eating healthier and working out with her 2-3 times a week, an hour each session.

I got on the scale yesterday to find I've gained 10 lbs since I weighed myself about 3 weeks ago. I don't think I look any thinner than before, but I don't look heavier either.

Is it possible to put on 10 or so lbs of muscle in a couple weeks?
by on May. 14, 2013 at 6:19 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
musicpisces
by Suzanne on May. 14, 2013 at 7:17 PM
1 mom liked this

No.  How has your eating been?  Are you really sore right now?  If you're sore, there can be more water retained to keep blood (and the cells that live in your blood) in your muscles to repair the fibers.  Sodium and refined carbs can make you retain water as well.

Weight can fluctuate by several pounds from one day to the next, too- mine can fluctuate by as much as 8 lbs.  But 10 lbs might be more than a fluctuation.  The average person puts on a pound of muscle in 6 months of weight training, but can put on 2-4 lbs in muscle in 12 weeks with a concerted effort.  That research was done on men.  So 10 lbs in 3 weeks is extremely unlikely.

JanuaryBaby06
by Member on May. 14, 2013 at 7:26 PM
1 mom liked this
Myth-Busters: Does Muscle weigh more then Fat..... Like a lot of people, you might think that muscle weighs more than fat. “When I hear this statement, I always think of the old riddle: Which weighs more, a pound of feathers or a pound of bricks?” says Laura Stusek, MS, fitness coordinator for Westminster College in Salt Lake City, Utah. “A pound is a pound!” Muscle vs. Fat: Clearing Up the Misconception Common sense tells us a pound of muscle and a pound of fat have to weigh the same, but they do differ in density. This means if you look at five pounds of muscle and five pounds of fat side by side, the fat takes up more volume, or space, than the muscle. That’s important when you’re on a diet and part of your goal is the lean look of muscle, not the flabby look of fat. So why do people say muscle weighs more than fat? “I find people make this statement when they put on weight,” says Stusek. “One person will say, ‘I gained three pounds and I’ve been working out.’ The good-friend response is, ‘It’s all muscle.’ And while this is a very comforting thing to hear, it’s just impossible to gain three pounds of muscle in a week. It is common for exercisers to lose fat and gain muscle without a change in body weight, so I understand why people often get frustrated.” Muscle vs. Fat: The Truth The first step in a successful diet and exercise program is to banish the idea that muscle weighs more and is therefore bad. In fact, Stusek recommends tossing out the scale altogether. “I try to get people to think about how they are feeling, how their clothes are fitting, and how their body has changed,” Stusek advises. “It’s a hard thing to do sometimes. The focus should not just be the number on the scale. If we only did things to make ourselves weigh less, we wouldn’t necessarily be healthier.” Muscle vs. Fat: The Benefits of Muscle In fact, not only should dieters stop thinking of muscle as the enemy, they should embrace it as their friend. Muscle boosts a person’s metabolism, so a pound of muscle will burn more calories at rest than a pound of fat. What does this mean? Even when you’re not exercising — you could be sitting on the couch watching TV — you will be burning more calories just by having more muscle. Muscle has other benefits, too. It’s critical in improving bone density and helps prevent the loss of muscle mass that occurs with aging, allowing people to stay active as they get older. Muscle vs. Fat: Ways to Gain Muscle There’s no doubt cardio workouts such as jogging, cycling, and walking are important for calorie burning and good health. But strength training is vital, too. “Of course, we always think of lifting weights to put on muscle, and many fear they will become ‘bulky,’” says Stusek. “Women need to stop worrying about this.” There are plenty of options to build muscle, ranging from free weights to resistance bands and even plain old soup cans. Stusek recommends enlisting the help of a personal trainer to design a balanced, full-body workout for the best results. “Or if you want to bulk up, lift heavy weights and do low repetitions,” she says. And two or three times a week, with at least one day off in between for muscle recovery, is sufficient. Ultimately, building muscle mass is a good thing. So find some enjoyable exercises and get lifting.
darbyakeep45
by Darby on May. 14, 2013 at 7:46 PM

Suzanne has the right advice...good luck!

musicpisces
by Suzanne on May. 14, 2013 at 7:49 PM

Right, but you won't gain 10 lbs of muscle in 3 weeks.  But yes, muscle is more dense than fat.

Quoting JanuaryBaby06:

Myth-Busters: Does Muscle weigh more then Fat..... Like a lot of people, you might think that muscle weighs more than fat. “When I hear this statement, I always think of the old riddle: Which weighs more, a pound of feathers or a pound of bricks?” says Laura Stusek, MS, fitness coordinator for Westminster College in Salt Lake City, Utah. “A pound is a pound!” Muscle vs. Fat: Clearing Up the Misconception Common sense tells us a pound of muscle and a pound of fat have to weigh the same, but they do differ in density. This means if you look at five pounds of muscle and five pounds of fat side by side, the fat takes up more volume, or space, than the muscle. That’s important when you’re on a diet and part of your goal is the lean look of muscle, not the flabby look of fat. So why do people say muscle weighs more than fat? “I find people make this statement when they put on weight,” says Stusek. “One person will say, ‘I gained three pounds and I’ve been working out.’ The good-friend response is, ‘It’s all muscle.’ And while this is a very comforting thing to hear, it’s just impossible to gain three pounds of muscle in a week. It is common for exercisers to lose fat and gain muscle without a change in body weight, so I understand why people often get frustrated.” Muscle vs. Fat: The Truth The first step in a successful diet and exercise program is to banish the idea that muscle weighs more and is therefore bad. In fact, Stusek recommends tossing out the scale altogether. “I try to get people to think about how they are feeling, how their clothes are fitting, and how their body has changed,” Stusek advises. “It’s a hard thing to do sometimes. The focus should not just be the number on the scale. If we only did things to make ourselves weigh less, we wouldn’t necessarily be healthier.” Muscle vs. Fat: The Benefits of Muscle In fact, not only should dieters stop thinking of muscle as the enemy, they should embrace it as their friend. Muscle boosts a person’s metabolism, so a pound of muscle will burn more calories at rest than a pound of fat. What does this mean? Even when you’re not exercising — you could be sitting on the couch watching TV — you will be burning more calories just by having more muscle. Muscle has other benefits, too. It’s critical in improving bone density and helps prevent the loss of muscle mass that occurs with aging, allowing people to stay active as they get older. Muscle vs. Fat: Ways to Gain Muscle There’s no doubt cardio workouts such as jogging, cycling, and walking are important for calorie burning and good health. But strength training is vital, too. “Of course, we always think of lifting weights to put on muscle, and many fear they will become ‘bulky,’” says Stusek. “Women need to stop worrying about this.” There are plenty of options to build muscle, ranging from free weights to resistance bands and even plain old soup cans. Stusek recommends enlisting the help of a personal trainer to design a balanced, full-body workout for the best results. “Or if you want to bulk up, lift heavy weights and do low repetitions,” she says. And two or three times a week, with at least one day off in between for muscle recovery, is sufficient. Ultimately, building muscle mass is a good thing. So find some enjoyable exercises and get lifting.


Suzanne

"Don't sacrifice what you want most for what you want right now."

lovinmykiddo07
by Member on May. 14, 2013 at 9:24 PM

My eating has been good. Within the past few months we have been eating a lot healthier, cutting out 90% of processed foods. 

My weight usually only fluctuates by 2-3 lbs so when I saw a 10 lb difference I was like okay, whoah. Wth? lol 

Quoting musicpisces:

No.  How has your eating been?  Are you really sore right now?  If you're sore, there can be more water retained to keep blood (and the cells that live in your blood) in your muscles to repair the fibers.  Sodium and refined carbs can make you retain water as well.

Weight can fluctuate by several pounds from one day to the next, too- mine can fluctuate by as much as 8 lbs.  But 10 lbs might be more than a fluctuation.  The average person puts on a pound of muscle in 6 months of weight training, but can put on 2-4 lbs in muscle in 12 weeks with a concerted effort.  That research was done on men.  So 10 lbs in 3 weeks is extremely unlikely.


CLEKate
by Bronze Member on May. 14, 2013 at 9:24 PM

Google and read "Why Scales Lie."  Provides some insight on why the scale may not be providing the most accurate information.

musicpisces
by Suzanne on May. 14, 2013 at 9:26 PM

May I ask how many calories you're eating a day?

I'd be the same way with a 10 lb difference! 

Quoting lovinmykiddo07:

My eating has been good. Within the past few months we have been eating a lot healthier, cutting out 90% of processed foods. 

My weight usually only fluctuates by 2-3 lbs so when I saw a 10 lb difference I was like okay, whoah. Wth? lol 

Quoting musicpisces:

No.  How has your eating been?  Are you really sore right now?  If you're sore, there can be more water retained to keep blood (and the cells that live in your blood) in your muscles to repair the fibers.  Sodium and refined carbs can make you retain water as well.

Weight can fluctuate by several pounds from one day to the next, too- mine can fluctuate by as much as 8 lbs.  But 10 lbs might be more than a fluctuation.  The average person puts on a pound of muscle in 6 months of weight training, but can put on 2-4 lbs in muscle in 12 weeks with a concerted effort.  That research was done on men.  So 10 lbs in 3 weeks is extremely unlikely.



Suzanne

"Don't sacrifice what you want most for what you want right now."

lovinmykiddo07
by Member on May. 14, 2013 at 9:27 PM

About 1200-1300. I try not to go over 1200 but sometimes it happens. :/ 

Quoting musicpisces:

May I ask how many calories you're eating a day?

I'd be the same way with a 10 lb difference! 

Quoting lovinmykiddo07:

My eating has been good. Within the past few months we have been eating a lot healthier, cutting out 90% of processed foods. 

My weight usually only fluctuates by 2-3 lbs so when I saw a 10 lb difference I was like okay, whoah. Wth? lol 

Quoting musicpisces:

No.  How has your eating been?  Are you really sore right now?  If you're sore, there can be more water retained to keep blood (and the cells that live in your blood) in your muscles to repair the fibers.  Sodium and refined carbs can make you retain water as well.

Weight can fluctuate by several pounds from one day to the next, too- mine can fluctuate by as much as 8 lbs.  But 10 lbs might be more than a fluctuation.  The average person puts on a pound of muscle in 6 months of weight training, but can put on 2-4 lbs in muscle in 12 weeks with a concerted effort.  That research was done on men.  So 10 lbs in 3 weeks is extremely unlikely.




musicpisces
by Suzanne on May. 14, 2013 at 9:32 PM

That might actually be part of the problem.  If you'd like, we can calculate your BMR.  We'll need your height, weight, age, and how often you work out.  Let us know if you're breastfeeding, too.

The thing about eating too few calories is that it will actually make you STOP burning fat and start burning PROTEIN (like muscle and organs).  Your BMR, or basal metabolic rate, is the MINIMUM number of calories your body requires in a day.  It accounts for the calories you burn with cell regeneration, breathing, things like that, but doesn't include digestion, talking, walking, or other normal daily processed.  Your metabolism will slow if you eat too much, and you can see your weight loss stop or even go in reverse (gain).

Quoting lovinmykiddo07:

About 1200-1300. I try not to go over 1200 but sometimes it happens. :/ 

Quoting musicpisces:

May I ask how many calories you're eating a day?

I'd be the same way with a 10 lb difference! 

Quoting lovinmykiddo07:

My eating has been good. Within the past few months we have been eating a lot healthier, cutting out 90% of processed foods. 

My weight usually only fluctuates by 2-3 lbs so when I saw a 10 lb difference I was like okay, whoah. Wth? lol 

Quoting musicpisces:

No.  How has your eating been?  Are you really sore right now?  If you're sore, there can be more water retained to keep blood (and the cells that live in your blood) in your muscles to repair the fibers.  Sodium and refined carbs can make you retain water as well.

Weight can fluctuate by several pounds from one day to the next, too- mine can fluctuate by as much as 8 lbs.  But 10 lbs might be more than a fluctuation.  The average person puts on a pound of muscle in 6 months of weight training, but can put on 2-4 lbs in muscle in 12 weeks with a concerted effort.  That research was done on men.  So 10 lbs in 3 weeks is extremely unlikely.





Suzanne

"Don't sacrifice what you want most for what you want right now."

lovinmykiddo07
by Member on May. 14, 2013 at 9:34 PM

Height: 5ft 
Weight: 140
Age:25..well, will be 25 on June 1st. :)
And I work out 3 hours a week. One hour, three days a week.  

And nooo breastfeeding. My little dude just turned 6 & I can't have any more kids so that ship has sailed long ago! haha

Quoting musicpisces:

That might actually be part of the problem.  If you'd like, we can calculate your BMR.  We'll need your height, weight, age, and how often you work out.  Let us know if you're breastfeeding, too.

The thing about eating too few calories is that it will actually make you STOP burning fat and start burning PROTEIN (like muscle and organs).  Your BMR, or basal metabolic rate, is the MINIMUM number of calories your body requires in a day.  It accounts for the calories you burn with cell regeneration, breathing, things like that, but doesn't include digestion, talking, walking, or other normal daily processed.  Your metabolism will slow if you eat too much, and you can see your weight loss stop or even go in reverse (gain).

Quoting lovinmykiddo07:

About 1200-1300. I try not to go over 1200 but sometimes it happens. :/ 

Quoting musicpisces:

May I ask how many calories you're eating a day?

I'd be the same way with a 10 lb difference! 

Quoting lovinmykiddo07:

My eating has been good. Within the past few months we have been eating a lot healthier, cutting out 90% of processed foods. 

My weight usually only fluctuates by 2-3 lbs so when I saw a 10 lb difference I was like okay, whoah. Wth? lol 

Quoting musicpisces:

No.  How has your eating been?  Are you really sore right now?  If you're sore, there can be more water retained to keep blood (and the cells that live in your blood) in your muscles to repair the fibers.  Sodium and refined carbs can make you retain water as well.

Weight can fluctuate by several pounds from one day to the next, too- mine can fluctuate by as much as 8 lbs.  But 10 lbs might be more than a fluctuation.  The average person puts on a pound of muscle in 6 months of weight training, but can put on 2-4 lbs in muscle in 12 weeks with a concerted effort.  That research was done on men.  So 10 lbs in 3 weeks is extremely unlikely.






Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)