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Body hardware question

Posted by on Jun. 9, 2013 at 11:14 AM
  • 13 Replies

Now that I am getting closer to my goal weight, I have a question about the permanent hardware put into my legs after my car accident.  I know some you are in the medical profession and I haven't been able to find an answer, so I thought I would ask here.

Does that hardware add any extra weight that I may have to account for?  

Having a rod in my femur and tibia seems like it should add a couple of permanent pounds, but I never thought about asking the surgeon and I usually only see my doctor once a year for a physical in December.

by on Jun. 9, 2013 at 11:14 AM
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Replies (1-10):
itsm3
by on Jun. 9, 2013 at 7:47 PM

honestly, don't even think about weight.  just go by inches lost.  weight is a very inaccurate way to measure progress.

Silvertears1275
by on Jun. 9, 2013 at 7:53 PM
They are usually very lightweight so I doubt they would make much of a difference.
TCain0001
by Member on Jun. 9, 2013 at 8:17 PM

I agree.  I believe they're usually lightweight titanium.....my mom had her hip and both her knees replaced, and that's what they put in for her.


Quoting Silvertears1275:

They are usually very lightweight so I doubt they would make much of a difference.



Javi05Eli07
by on Jun. 9, 2013 at 10:27 PM

Awesome, I figured they were pretty light weight, but wasn't sure.  I do notice that my lower leg feels a little heavier, but I also don't have full range of motion in my ankle.  Which is what got me thinking about it.

I don't worry as much about weight, I do keep track of it as well as measurements.

musicpisces
by Suzanne on Jun. 10, 2013 at 12:58 AM

It won't be a big difference (of course, how much is getting replaced is a factor).  Maybe a few ounces.  It's one factor when they're designing hardware.  You can't have one limb that's way heavier than the other, or you'll give someone a whole new host of issues.  There may be a small difference, though, and you sound like you can feel it, which is normal, but it really is only a few ounces at most, most likely.  It won't significantly affect the scale. 

Suzanne

"Don't sacrifice what you want most for what you want right now."

Javi05Eli07
by on Jun. 10, 2013 at 9:53 AM

I have one in my left tibia and the other in my right femur, so I would say it is probably pretty balanced.  I just feel it more with my left leg, maybe because it is lower to the ground and gets lifted higher than my femur, like when doing butt kicks in warm-ups.

Quoting musicpisces:

It won't be a big difference (of course, how much is getting replaced is a factor).  Maybe a few ounces.  It's one factor when they're designing hardware.  You can't have one limb that's way heavier than the other, or you'll give someone a whole new host of issues.  There may be a small difference, though, and you sound like you can feel it, which is normal, but it really is only a few ounces at most, most likely.  It won't significantly affect the scale. 


musicpisces
by Suzanne on Jun. 10, 2013 at 10:16 AM

What kind of hardware is it?  Hardware can be anything from a screw to a replacement bone.  But yes, the further it is from the center of gravity the more you might feel it.

Quoting Javi05Eli07:

I have one in my left tibia and the other in my right femur, so I would say it is probably pretty balanced.  I just feel it more with my left leg, maybe because it is lower to the ground and gets lifted higher than my femur, like when doing butt kicks in warm-ups.

Quoting musicpisces:

It won't be a big difference (of course, how much is getting replaced is a factor).  Maybe a few ounces.  It's one factor when they're designing hardware.  You can't have one limb that's way heavier than the other, or you'll give someone a whole new host of issues.  There may be a small difference, though, and you sound like you can feel it, which is normal, but it really is only a few ounces at most, most likely.  It won't significantly affect the scale. 



Suzanne

"Don't sacrifice what you want most for what you want right now."

Javi05Eli07
by on Jun. 10, 2013 at 1:05 PM

I have a rod in my tibia with 3 screws at the knee and 2 at the ankle and a plate and 4 screws on my fibula.  My femur just has the rod in it and a nail/screw near the knee.

Quoting musicpisces:

What kind of hardware is it?  Hardware can be anything from a screw to a replacement bone.  But yes, the further it is from the center of gravity the more you might feel it.

Quoting Javi05Eli07:

I have one in my left tibia and the other in my right femur, so I would say it is probably pretty balanced.  I just feel it more with my left leg, maybe because it is lower to the ground and gets lifted higher than my femur, like when doing butt kicks in warm-ups.

Quoting musicpisces:

It won't be a big difference (of course, how much is getting replaced is a factor).  Maybe a few ounces.  It's one factor when they're designing hardware.  You can't have one limb that's way heavier than the other, or you'll give someone a whole new host of issues.  There may be a small difference, though, and you sound like you can feel it, which is normal, but it really is only a few ounces at most, most likely.  It won't significantly affect the scale. 




Ability is what you're capable of doing.

Motivation determines what you do.

Attitude determines how well you do it.

~Lou Holtz~

musicpisces
by Suzanne on Jun. 10, 2013 at 3:01 PM

Oh man, those must have been fun to heal from.  I'd say they may add a couple of ounces, but not much more than that.  I can see why you'd feel the weight of the fibula more, though.  Bone is pretty heavy to begin with, because it's vascular, and especially in a larger bone like the femur, you have marrow, which is fluid, and heavy, where the rod is.  I wouldn't adjust your weight goals based on the hardware.  Hope that helps some!  Thanks for sharing the images- they're always interesting to see!  I can't imagine going through all of that.  I'm glad you're okay now.  =)

Quoting Javi05Eli07:

I have a rod in my tibia with 3 screws at the knee and 2 at the ankle and a plate and 4 screws on my fibula.  My femur just has the rod in it and a nail/screw near the knee.

Quoting musicpisces:

What kind of hardware is it?  Hardware can be anything from a screw to a replacement bone.  But yes, the further it is from the center of gravity the more you might feel it.

Quoting Javi05Eli07:

I have one in my left tibia and the other in my right femur, so I would say it is probably pretty balanced.  I just feel it more with my left leg, maybe because it is lower to the ground and gets lifted higher than my femur, like when doing butt kicks in warm-ups.

Quoting musicpisces:

It won't be a big difference (of course, how much is getting replaced is a factor).  Maybe a few ounces.  It's one factor when they're designing hardware.  You can't have one limb that's way heavier than the other, or you'll give someone a whole new host of issues.  There may be a small difference, though, and you sound like you can feel it, which is normal, but it really is only a few ounces at most, most likely.  It won't significantly affect the scale. 





Suzanne

"Don't sacrifice what you want most for what you want right now."

Javi05Eli07
by on Jun. 10, 2013 at 9:55 PM

Thanks!

It was fun proving the doctors wrong.  They said I would never run or do most workouts again, even after bone grafting because it wouldn't be strong enough.  I healed myself with P90X within 7 months.  Those two were the most severe injuries.  I also had 3 cracked ribs, cracked vertebral processes, 2 cracks in my pelvis, cracked/broken right patella, various broken bones in my left foot, lacerated liver, crushed nerve in left foot, and shredded the shin muscle and skin.  The most damage was done because the seat snapped my left leg and pinned my foot under the seat.  The fire department tried pulling me out before they cleared the snow away from around my legs, so I am sure that didn't help.

I asked a number of times while in the hospital to have the tibia and fibula cut off.  And, from what the surgeon told me is that I actually came very close to it being done because of how close the bone fragments were to cutting the major blood supply.  I have pics of the skin injuries on my FB if you would like to take a gander.  https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10150228725256596.319253.564591595&type=3

Quoting musicpisces:

Oh man, those must have been fun to heal from.  I'd say they may add a couple of ounces, but not much more than that.  I can see why you'd feel the weight of the fibula more, though.  Bone is pretty heavy to begin with, because it's vascular, and especially in a larger bone like the femur, you have marrow, which is fluid, and heavy, where the rod is.  I wouldn't adjust your weight goals based on the hardware.  Hope that helps some!  Thanks for sharing the images- they're always interesting to see!  I can't imagine going through all of that.  I'm glad you're okay now.  =)

Quoting Javi05Eli07:

I have a rod in my tibia with 3 screws at the knee and 2 at the ankle and a plate and 4 screws on my fibula.  My femur just has the rod in it and a nail/screw near the knee.

Quoting musicpisces:

What kind of hardware is it?  Hardware can be anything from a screw to a replacement bone.  But yes, the further it is from the center of gravity the more you might feel it.

Quoting Javi05Eli07:

I have one in my left tibia and the other in my right femur, so I would say it is probably pretty balanced.  I just feel it more with my left leg, maybe because it is lower to the ground and gets lifted higher than my femur, like when doing butt kicks in warm-ups.

Quoting musicpisces:

It won't be a big difference (of course, how much is getting replaced is a factor).  Maybe a few ounces.  It's one factor when they're designing hardware.  You can't have one limb that's way heavier than the other, or you'll give someone a whole new host of issues.  There may be a small difference, though, and you sound like you can feel it, which is normal, but it really is only a few ounces at most, most likely.  It won't significantly affect the scale. 






Ability is what you're capable of doing.

Motivation determines what you do.

Attitude determines how well you do it.

~Lou Holtz~

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