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Linds2Horse

Posted by on Nov. 28, 2012 at 1:24 PM
  • 6 Replies

My dog sticks her tounge out a lot now that she getting older. Is this normal?

see her tounge- it just hangs out :(

by on Nov. 28, 2012 at 1:24 PM
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Replies (1-6):
Linds2Horse
by Platinum Member on Nov. 28, 2012 at 1:33 PM

I studied large animal reproduction so I'm not too aware of many dog issues.  I do know there are a lot of things that can cause a dog to drop its tongue with more frequency like facial nerve damage, sinus infections, salivary infection, dental problems, a stroke, thyroid problems causing her to pant more, esophageal tumor.  Is this one of those things that you've just sort of noticed over time, or does it seem like it's just started happening?  Is she panting more or is her tongue flacid?  Is it just tip or her entire tongue?

Linds2Horse
by Platinum Member on Nov. 28, 2012 at 1:38 PM

Just noticed your picture.  When you touch it does she immediately retract it into her mouth, or does it continue to droop?  Have you noticed any change in her gaits?  Hanging her tongue off the one side would be more of an indication of facial nerve or muscle damage, or possibly even a stroke.  (If she had a thyroid problem, dental issues, salivary infection, for example, she'd stick her tongue out to the front like she were panting.)  I'm not saying that she has muscle or nerve damage,  or a stroke, just that hanging her tongue to the side is more of an involuntary action on her part.

inmybizz
by Ruby Member on Nov. 28, 2012 at 1:44 PM


Quoting Linds2Horse:

I studied large animal reproduction so I'm not too aware of many dog issues.  I do know there are a lot of things that can cause a dog to drop its tongue with more frequency like facial nerve damage, sinus infections, salivary infection, dental problems, a stroke, thyroid problems causing her to pant more, esophageal tumor.  Is this one of those things that you've just sort of noticed over time, or does it seem like it's just started happening?  Is she panting more or is her tongue flacid?  Is it just tip or her entire tongue?

3yrs ago she has issues with her gums and needed to have all but one tooth removed. Since the surgey she had been able to keep her tounge in until a few months ago. we noticed when she's relaxed her tongue drops. Sometimes it's just the tip, other times her entire tongue hangs. I guess she's just getting old and things start to hang.

inmybizz
by Ruby Member on Nov. 28, 2012 at 1:47 PM

when you touch it she retracts her tongue. She has been a little wobbly but we attributed that to her age.

Quoting Linds2Horse:

Just noticed your picture.  When you touch it does she immediately retract it into her mouth, or does it continue to droop?  Have you noticed any change in her gaits?  Hanging her tongue off the one side would be more of an indication of facial nerve or muscle damage, or possibly even a stroke.  (If she had a thyroid problem, dental issues, salivary infection, for example, she'd stick her tongue out to the front like she were panting.)  I'm not saying that she has muscle or nerve damage,  or a stroke, just that hanging her tongue to the side is more of an involuntary action on her part.


Linds2Horse
by Platinum Member on Nov. 28, 2012 at 2:10 PM

It very well could be part of old age. The tongue is a muscle and we do lose muscle mass as we age. You should keep an eye on her and contact your vet if you notice more drool or if she has trouble drinking, or most obviously if you are concerned.  Because the tongue is a muscle it can atrophy if not used.  Increased drooling and difficulty drinking would be signs of muscle atrophy.

inmybizz
by Ruby Member on Nov. 28, 2012 at 2:24 PM


Quoting Linds2Horse:

It very well could be part of old age. The tongue is a muscle and we do lose muscle mass as we age. You should keep an eye on her and contact your vet if you notice more drool or if she has trouble drinking, or most obviously if you are concerned.  Because the tongue is a muscle it can atrophy if not used.  Increased drooling and difficulty drinking would be signs of muscle atrophy.

Thanks!!

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