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an interesting article about catholic convents

Posted by on Sep. 28, 2010 at 11:54 PM
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I hope you don't mind, but I thought I woud post this link for the members to read.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/former-nun-tells-of-sex-and-suffering-inside-indian-convent-1627077.html

Blessings,

Kris

by on Sep. 28, 2010 at 11:54 PM
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MrsMilton
by Group Owner on Sep. 30, 2010 at 8:13 PM

This is a very interesting post... There is so much going on inside the Catholic church, and even some things they do in the community. 

proverbsgal40
by Member on Oct. 1, 2010 at 8:20 AM

I haven't read about anything done in the community, but it would not suprise me.

What have you discovered they're doing?

blessings,

Kris

MrsMilton
by Group Owner on Oct. 1, 2010 at 11:07 AM

Some openly display predjudice against other races... And they also supported the Nazi's, and the Illuminati. They have even called their priest, Freemasonic Priest. This is an occult. The Roman Empire is controlling the United States and everything they do. They have been trying for many years to establish "The New World Order." 

There is not one of our Presidents and government officials, who don't know about this. They know, but they are just not telling the people.

MrsMilton
by Group Owner on Oct. 1, 2010 at 11:16 AM

In 1933, under the leadership of its Cardinal Secretary of State, Eugenio Pacelli (who became Pope Pius XII), the Vatican negotiated a Concordat with Adolf Hitler. Catholic historian James Carroll writes:

“Even an indirect endorsement meant everything to Hitler as he sought to establish his legitimacy at home and abroad.  In these early months of 1933, Catholic leaders went from being Hitler’s staunch opponents to his latest allies. This transformation was dramatically symbolized by the fact that in 1932, the Fulda Episcopal Conference, representing the Catholic hierarchy of Germany, banned membership in the Nazi Party and forbade priests from offering communion to anyone wearing the swastika; then, on March 28, 1933, two weeks after Pacelli offered his overture to Hitler, the same Fulda conferees voted to lift the ban on Catholic membership in the Nazi Party. The bishops expressed, as they put it, ‘a certain confidence in the new government, subject to reservations concerning some religious and moral lapses.’  Swastika bearers would now be welcomed at the communion rail.”

As part of its Concordat with the Nazi regime, the Vatican had the huge Centre party, the Catholic party, which had previously opposed the Nazis, vote for the so-called ‘Enabling Act,’ which gave Hitler dictatorial powers, and then dissolve itself. Carroll writes:

“The Reichskonkordat effectively removed the Catholic Church from any continued role of opposition to Hitler.  More than that, as Hitler told his cabinet on July 14, it established a context that would be ‘especially significant in the urgent struggle against international Jewry.’ The deep well of Catholic antisemitism would be tapped, to run as freely as any stream of hate in Germany.  The positive side of the long-standing ambivalence, which had again and again been the source of impulses to protect Jews, would now be eliminated, allowing the negative side to metastasize.”
– 
J. Carroll, Constantine‘s Sword, (New York, 2002) 498-500


MrsMilton
by Group Owner on Oct. 1, 2010 at 11:20 AM

First, the existence of a human impulse to decency, whether among Catholics or anyone else, is not proof of official policy. As a youthful participant in the US Civil Rights movement, I saw whites who objected to - and even took brave action to oppose - harsh treatment of black people. Such actions, while heartening, do not disprove the existence of an officially sanctioned system of abuse predicated on a theory (in this case, that blacks were supposedly less human). Similarly, of course many Catholics have been kind towards Jews and even drawn towards Jewish culture and thinking.  But this does not contradict a 2,000 year policy of the Church hierarchy which has a) stigmatized Jews as “killers of Jesus,” which belief has fed and justified antisemitism, including the Nazi variety and b) discriminated sharply and/or subtly against Jews (e.g., the ghettos in which Jews were forced to live in the papal states) and c) conducted brutal campaigns against Jews (the inquisition is only one example.)

MrsMilton
by Group Owner on Oct. 1, 2010 at 11:25 AM

Croatian Ustashi fuehrer Ante Pavelic giving Nazi salute (far left) with Archbishop Alojzije Stepinac (far right) and other Catholic Church leaders



A Cardinal marches with the German Nazis
 
(Source: A Moral Reckoning: The Role of the Catholic Church in the Holocaust and Its Unfulfilled Duty of Repair by Daniel Jonah Goldhagen.) There is a dispute as to whether the high-ranking Catholic clergyman marching between rows of SA men at a Nazi rally in Munich, pictured above, is Munich’s Cardinal Michael von Faulhaber or papal nuncio Archbishop Cesare Orsenigo. 

In the Vatican’s much-praised, “We Remember: Reflections on the Holocaust,”  we read:

“The well-known Advent sermons of Cardinal Faulhaber in 1933, the very year in which National Socialism came to power, at which not just Catholics but also Protestants and Jews were present, clearly expressed rejection of the Nazi anti-Semitic propaganda.”
http://tinyurl.com/bxszb

Could it be that the Jesuit scholars who wrote “We Remember” never read Cardinal Faulhaber’s 1933 Advent sermons? If so, let me assist. I have the full text in front of me. The Cardinal’s position was precisely the opposite of what the Vatican claims.

What the Nazis called ‘race culture’ consisted of indoctrinating the population in belief in a fictional but nevertheless superior and glorious German volk and an equally imaginary but nevertheless evil and subhuman people, the Jews, and their subhuman agents, the Slavs and blacks. This so-called ‘culture,’ which is essentially modern racism elevated to the status of official doctrine, was supported by Nazi-sanctioned quacks, called ‘race scientists.’ To claim that someone endorsed Nazi ‘race culture’ but opposed Nazi antisemitism would be as silly as claiming that someone endorsed anti-black racism but opposed hatred of black people.

Keeping this in mind, here is what Faulhaber wrote about Nazi ‘race culture’ in the Vatican-authorized translation of the Advent sermons, published immediately after Faulhaber delivered them:

“From the Church’s point of view there is no objection whatsoever to racial research and race culture.” (page 107)

Faulhaber was making it perfectly clear: the Catholic churchshould have no objection to Nazi antisemitism and glorification of a German so-called Volk. (I emphasized ‘should’ because, while the translation reads, “there is no objection,” as my colleague Samantha Criscione argues in an as yet unpublished text, in fact when Bavarian Cardinal Faulhaber delivered the sermons, a great many Bavarian Catholics did have objections to Nazi ‘race culture’ and ‘racial research’; so not only was Faulhaber endorsing the core of Nazi hate gibberish, but, as Ms. Criscione argues, he, as the ranking Bavarian cleric, was ordering the hierarchy to crack down on Catholics who challenged Nazi racism.  Thus the sermons were a blow to the anti-Nazi movement in Germany. Rather than opposing the Nazis, Faulhaber sounded the charge against their opponents in the church. 

Faulhaber did dispute the demand raised by some Nazis that Christians reject the ‘Old Testament’ (the Torah). This was a practical matter. According to Catholic doctrine, with the death of Jesus Christianity inherited the mantle of “the true Israel” from the Jews, meaning that Christian scripture was a continuation of pre-Christian Jewish scripture - the Torah. If Christians rejected the Torah, they rejected the possibility of being the “true Israel.”

Notice how, in the Advent sermons, Faulhaber went out of his way to stress that by accepting the Torah as the work of God, Christians were not therefore accepting the Jews:

“By accepting these books [i.e., the Torah -J.I.], Christianity does not become a Jewish religion. These books were not composed by Jews; they are inspired by the Holy Ghost, and therefore they are the word of God, they are God’s books.  The writers of them were God’s pencils, the psalm-singers were harps in the hand of God, the Prophets were announcers of God’s revelation. It is for this reason that the scriptures of the Old Testament are worthy of credence and veneration for all time.  Antagonism to the Jews of today must not be extended to the books of Pre-Christian Judaism.”  - p.14
[My emphasis - J.I.]
- Faulhaber, Cardinal Michael von, “Judaism, Christianity, Germany.” (New York, Macmillan: 1934)

So Faulhaber was not saying Christians should reject racist attitudes towards Jews.  He was saying he had no problem with “race culture,” but hatred of Jews should not extend to pre-Christian Hebrew religious texts, which were a Christian legacy of heavenly origin, and anyway, had nothing to do with the Jews.

Point, game, set, match.

==================



Croatian Ustashi dictator Ante Pavelic with Franciscan monks.  The Franciscan order was active in the genocide against Serbs, Jews and Roma.

 


MrsMilton
by Group Owner on Oct. 1, 2010 at 11:54 AM

MrsMilton
by Group Owner on Oct. 1, 2010 at 12:16 PM

MrsMilton
by Group Owner on Oct. 1, 2010 at 12:16 PM

MrsMilton
by Group Owner on Oct. 1, 2010 at 12:27 PM

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