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VBAC

Posted by on Jul. 8, 2011 at 9:01 PM
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Does anyone have any reliable info about vbacs? My doctor told me today that I could try having a vbac so I want to get as much info as possible. I am due in November so I have some time but I want a plan because to me, this is kind of a huge deal lol I don't like using google because who knows who put that info on websites. 

If it helps, the reason I had a c section with my son was because my pelvic bones are very small and my sons head was turned sideways so he didn't fit.

by on Jul. 8, 2011 at 9:01 PM
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Replies (1-10):
KelliansMom
by Darbie - Head Admin on Jul. 8, 2011 at 9:46 PM

i believe there is a group on here....and if you are going to do a vbac i would suggest getting all the info on different birth positions laying on your back to push doesnt open your hips as much as say squatting does ...i know a few ppl who have had succseful vbacs (one just had her baby on the 4th and it was her second time after he c section :)) 

KelliansMom
by Darbie - Head Admin on Jul. 8, 2011 at 9:47 PM

ICAN is a good orginazation for information

mommy2dallas602
by on Jul. 8, 2011 at 10:02 PM

Thank You!

doulala
by Bronze Member on Jul. 9, 2011 at 2:39 AM


I am a big VBAC advocate and have a lot of info to offer...   Where to begin?!   lol!


Do you have a different doctor than the with the previous pregnancy?
Why does this doctor feel that the issue before is irrelevant now?
How was it discovered that baby wouldn't fit?

(*Who you hire for your maternity care can be your biggest risk factor.)



Reluctant doctors like to believe that they haven't much influence over
their patients, but that is clearly not the case. Several studies have
found that when doctors genuinely encouraged women to have VBACs, most
of them did, and when they said nothing or acted neutral, most women
didn't. Finally, when obstetricians discouraged VBAC in women who
wanted to try it,none of them did.

Henci Goer, Thinking Woman's Guide to a Better Birth

mommy2dallas602
by on Jul. 9, 2011 at 9:46 AM
Ooh yay! Ok lol
I have the same doctor
I dont understand your second question. Do you mean why does my doctor think Id be able to have a vaginal delivery this time? If so, my son was 8lbs so if they think this baby is gonna be smallet, she might fit.
And I have no idea how she knew! I pushed for 2 hours and thats what she told me.
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MomToovey
by Marianne - Admin on Jul. 9, 2011 at 11:06 AM

 I don't have any info. The only friend I have that I know personally who was going to get one, ended up not being able to do it after all. I just wanted to share my excitement with you! I hope it works out and I can't wait for the birth story! LOL!

doulala
by Bronze Member on Jul. 9, 2011 at 11:06 AM

How was your labor?
Did anything happen to intervene in the normal labor process (meds, IV, early admittance in labor, etc)?

I was wondering if you'd had an accident, illness, birth defect, x-ray, the pink test, something to indicate that you might have a reason not to allow baby to pass through (as per normal).
Some reason for the doctor to say that.   Otherwise there is a good chance it was just about how you were laboring (and the attendant's style, skills, patience, etc.)   

OBs are high-risk doctors/surgeons and trained to specialize is sickness, complications, interventions.    Watching and helping a normal vaginal birth is not generally their specialty.    Moms who prefer a normal vaginal birth can hire a normal birth specialist, a midwife, to improve the chances to experience their preferences.

With the little understanding I have about your experience and attendant, I would strongly encourage you to consider interviewing other care providers.   If you stay with the one that may not have had the skills to help you before, your chances may not be great in the future.


Your doctor can guesstimate baby's size but can't *know* if baby will be smaller, same sized, or larger...  And your doctor might not know how to help you have a safer experience (vaginal) birth if baby is bigger.    Even with very large babies, babies who get stuck, asinclitism (like yours?), etc., there are some things to prevent or handle complications.    The care provider's skills to help depend on knowledge, training, experience.   

Because cesareans are very common (about 1 in 3) and most are unnecessary (about 2 in that 3), women have to really do their homework if they want to avoid a cesarean.    Allowing the doctor to take care of things will not improve her odds.   
Knowing that most cesareans are preventable is encouraging thought; we don't have to have them.   We just have to know what to do to avoid the unnecessary.
:-)



Some main considerations:
Who we hire for our maternity care can be our greatest risk factor.
Birth setting is relevant in a similar way; ability to provide the service we want.
Confidence and understanding in the normal process to know when to say yes/no to interventions
Support & encouragement from those around us. 
Advocacy through the process.   In labor (or even just prenatal appts), we can feel vulnerable and more agreeable to Their Way/protocol (which isn't necessarily safer, healthier, on the path to mom's goals).


Having a safer birth experience is worth working for!
:-)






Reluctant doctors like to believe that they haven't much influence over
their patients, but that is clearly not the case. Several studies have
found that when doctors genuinely encouraged women to have VBACs, most
of them did, and when they said nothing or acted neutral, most women
didn't. Finally, when obstetricians discouraged VBAC in women who
wanted to try it,none of them did.

Henci Goer, Thinking Woman's Guide to a Better Birth

mommy2dallas602
by on Jul. 9, 2011 at 6:49 PM


Quoting MomToovey:

 I don't have any info. The only friend I have that I know personally who was going to get one, ended up not being able to do it after all. I just wanted to share my excitement with you! I hope it works out and I can't wait for the birth story! LOL!

Thanks!!

mommy2dallas602
by on Jul. 9, 2011 at 6:51 PM


Quoting doulala:

How was your labor?
Did anything happen to intervene in the normal labor process (meds, IV, early admittance in labor, etc)?

I was wondering if you'd had an accident, illness, birth defect, x-ray, the pink test, something to indicate that you might have a reason not to allow baby to pass through (as per normal).
Some reason for the doctor to say that.   Otherwise there is a good chance it was just about how you were laboring (and the attendant's style, skills, patience, etc.)   

OBs are high-risk doctors/surgeons and trained to specialize is sickness, complications, interventions.    Watching and helping a normal vaginal birth is not generally their specialty.    Moms who prefer a normal vaginal birth can hire a normal birth specialist, a midwife, to improve the chances to experience their preferences.

With the little understanding I have about your experience and attendant, I would strongly encourage you to consider interviewing other care providers.   If you stay with the one that may not have had the skills to help you before, your chances may not be great in the future.


Your doctor can guesstimate baby's size but can't *know* if baby will be smaller, same sized, or larger...  And your doctor might not know how to help you have a safer experience (vaginal) birth if baby is bigger.    Even with very large babies, babies who get stuck, asinclitism (like yours?), etc., there are some things to prevent or handle complications.    The care provider's skills to help depend on knowledge, training, experience.   

Because cesareans are very common (about 1 in 3) and most are unnecessary (about 2 in that 3), women have to really do their homework if they want to avoid a cesarean.    Allowing the doctor to take care of things will not improve her odds.   
Knowing that most cesareans are preventable is encouraging thought; we don't have to have them.   We just have to know what to do to avoid the unnecessary.
:-)



Some main considerations:
Who we hire for our maternity care can be our greatest risk factor.
Birth setting is relevant in a similar way; ability to provide the service we want.
Confidence and understanding in the normal process to know when to say yes/no to interventions
Support & encouragement from those around us. 
Advocacy through the process.   In labor (or even just prenatal appts), we can feel vulnerable and more agreeable to Their Way/protocol (which isn't necessarily safer, healthier, on the path to mom's goals).


Having a safer birth experience is worth working for!
:-)






My labor was awful! I went in blind so I did everything the doctors told me, including getting put on pitocin for 2 days. I also had an epidural after 19 hours of labor.

I did not have any kind of accidents or anything else.

Thanks for the info!!

doulala
by Bronze Member on Jul. 9, 2011 at 6:58 PM

I can't *know* but it sounds like nothing in there would inhibit a safe, future vaginal birth then.
But under those circumstances I really think it would be better (as in safer) to consider using someone else to help you achieve your goals.
(Your doctor says you "can have a vbac" but with that history, adding the unlikelihood of continued support for a natural birth through the end, you may be more likely to find yourself in the OR again.)

Are you interested in interviewing other providers?
It might be nice to hear other perspectives.





"If you don't know your options you don't have any"          ~Korte & Scaer

"If you choose not to decide you still have made a choice."    
           ~Rush

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