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New mommy with formula problems..

Posted by on Mar. 18, 2013 at 8:35 PM
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I just had my daughter on the first on February and I had to have a emergency C section so I didnt get breast milk for a little over a week and when I finally did I was only getting a Oz at a time and she was spitting most of it up.. So I decided to just keep her on formula. In the hospital they were giving her the Sensitive kind so I kept her on that.. A two weeks ago I noticed that her tummy was really upset and she was pooping A LOT.. My brothers and I are lactose so I thought maybe that could be it.. I switched her to a soy biased formula about a week ago and now her tummy sounds a lot better BUT shes pooping twice as much... I DONT KNOW WHAT TO DO. I feel like Im doing something wrong bc I dont know if the milk is hurting her and I keep giving it to her. Opinions moms.. please!! 

by on Mar. 18, 2013 at 8:35 PM
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KelliansMom
by Darbie - Head Admin on Mar. 18, 2013 at 8:57 PM

what is her poop like?  formula is very hard on babies tummy and it takes a bit for their tummies to adjust to a change too normally a week or so. 

NiniD
by New Member on Mar. 18, 2013 at 9:02 PM

Its like a mustard color.. very smelly.. and she FILLS the dipper every time.

cabrandy03
by Brandy - Admin on Mar. 18, 2013 at 9:11 PM
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I really don't know much about formula feeding.  Have you talked to her pediatrician?

When you say you were only getting an ounce at a time when you were breastfeeding are you talking about with a pump?  Because an ounce with a pump is a very normal output, baby can get a lot more milk out then a pump can.  It's also fairly normal for it to take up to a week for your milk to come in, it dosn't mean you have to give formula.  Colostrum is all your baby needs those first days of life.  I'm not trying to make you feel guilty or anything, I just think you were given some bad informattion and wanted to make sure you knew the facts incase you ever have another baby.  If you are still interested in breastfeeding this baby, it's not to late, there are ways to relactate.  Again, not trying to put any pressure on you or make you feel guilty just wanted to let you know.

KelliansMom
by Darbie - Head Admin on Mar. 18, 2013 at 9:22 PM
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Quoting NiniD:

Its like a mustard color.. very smelly.. and she FILLS the dipper every time.

not watery? 

I would  worry more if it was hard and looked like rabbit poop (little round pelets). If ou are worried i would speak with your childs doctor and they will help you out better. 


jobberwocky
by Chrissy - Admin on Mar. 18, 2013 at 9:42 PM
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If its not hard it's fine. My son had yellow smelly poop on formula for awhile. Formula fed babies poop a lot more then breast fed babies.
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MomToovey
by Marianne - Owner on Mar. 18, 2013 at 9:56 PM
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Based on your description of the poop, it all sounds normal. But if you're concerned, give the doctor a call.
I also want to add for the record that I agree with cabrandy03. I'm sorry things worked out the way they did this time, but next time don't let anyone pressure you into stopping the breastfeeding.
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NiniD
by New Member on Mar. 18, 2013 at 10:17 PM

I did, I talked to him last week, he told me to keep doing what I was doing and it would get bette. Im concered bc it hasn't changed since then. 

Yes, I was using a pump. I latched her on but I didnt seem to get her any that way. If I was only getting a little at time like that would it have been ok to switch her back and fourth from breast milk to formula to get her full? Ways to relactae? really? How? I would if I could, I was thinking it was all gone by now! 

Thank you!!


Quoting cabrandy03:

I really don't know much about formula feeding.  Have you talked to her pediatrician?

When you say you were only getting an ounce at a time when you were breastfeeding are you talking about with a pump?  Because an ounce with a pump is a very normal output, baby can get a lot more milk out then a pump can.  It's also fairly normal for it to take up to a week for your milk to come in, it dosn't mean you have to give formula.  Colostrum is all your baby needs those first days of life.  I'm not trying to make you feel guilty or anything, I just think you were given some bad informattion and wanted to make sure you knew the facts incase you ever have another baby.  If you are still interested in breastfeeding this baby, it's not to late, there are ways to relactate.  Again, not trying to put any pressure on you or make you feel guilty just wanted to let you know.



cabrandy03
by Brandy - Admin on Mar. 18, 2013 at 11:02 PM
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If you are still interested in breastfeeding there are ways to reestablish a milk supply, it is definetly not to late and it is totally okay to both breastfeed and use formula. There is no reason it has to be an all or nothing kind of thing. There are still tons of benefits for baby and yourself even if your just breastfeeding part time. It's really unfortunate but a lot of health professionals really arn't very knowledable about breastfeeding and a lot of new moms are given a lot of bad information after delivery. First of all I just want to say that there is no way to tell if baby is getting enough milk from the breast other then diaper count. Ideally you want baby to have a minimum of 6 wet diapers a day (poopy diapers count as 2, so 4 wet diapers and a poopy diaper works). As long as baby is getting the minimum number of wet diapers a day your milk supply is fine. Also it is totally normal for a breastfed newborn to want to nurse constantly and never seem satisfied. It doesn't mean you don't have enough milk it just means that your milk is so perfect that it digests very quickly (breastmilk can digest in as little as 20 minutes). Anyway here is some information about relactation from kellymom.com:

Relactation and Adoptive Breastfeeding:

The Basics August 27, 2011. Posted in: Adoptive BF/ Relactation,Got Milk? More Sharing Services By Kelly Bonyata, BS, IBCLC

Relactation or induced lactation (for those who did not give birth to their baby) is essentially a two-fold process: You will be teaching (or re-teaching) baby to nurse at the breast, and to equate nursing with comfort. If you’re having problems getting baby to nurse, see Help — My Baby Won’t Nurse! At the same time you will be developing (or re-developing) a milk supply. Developing a milk supply requires nipple stimulation (via baby nursing, hand expression, pumping or a combination) and milk removal (once there is milk to remove). If your baby will nurse, regular and frequent nursing sessions (even if baby is just learning in the beginning) will be very helpful. If your baby is 4 months old or younger it will generally be easier to relactate. It will also be easier if your milk supply was well established (frequent and effective nursing and/or pumping) during the first 4-6 weeks postpartum. However, moms with older babies, moms who did not establish a good milk supply in the beginning, and adoptive moms who have never breastfed can also get good results. Keep in mind that breastfeeding is not just about the milk. Your child will get numerous benefits from breastfeeding even if you do not have a full milk supply. If baby is willing to latch on, then nurse often (at least every 2-3 hours). Also, offer baby the breast for comfort any time you see a chance- at the end of a feeding when he is not hungry, when he is going to sleep and just waking up, and whenever he needs to comfort suck. Even if baby is not getting any milk at first, the nursing will be signaling your breasts to make milk. What if baby will not latch? Keep working at it – some babies have gone back to the breast after many months of bottle feeding. Even if you are not able to persuade baby to latch, you have the option of re-establishing your milk supply via pumping and giving baby your milk via bottle or cup (this is called exclusive pumping). If baby is not nursing well (or not yet latching at all), pumping will make a big difference in increasing your milk supply. Even if baby appears to be nursing well, additional pumping will speed up the relactation process. See Establishing and maintaining milk supply when baby is not nursing for more information. You will also want to take a look at Hidden Hindrances to a Healthy Milk Supply to see if there are any factors that may compromise your milk supply. Consider giving your baby his feedings via an alternative feeding method (rather than a bottle), such as a nursing supplementer, feeding syringe, finger feeding setup, flexible cup, spoon, medicine/eye dropper, etc. If your baby is latching well, a nursing supplementer can be a big help: it will encourage your baby to nurse at your breast by giving him a constant flow of milk (expressed milk and/or formula) while he stimulates your breasts to produce more milk. Read more about nursing supplementers in Notes from “Induced Lactation and Adoptive Nursing”. Some mothers use herbal supplements, such as fenugreek or blessed thistle, to stimulate milk production. You can usually buy these at health food stores or herb shops and occasionally at some large supermarkets or pharmacies. For more information see What is a galactagogue? Do I need one? …Herbal remedies for increasing milk supply. There are also several prescription medications that increase milk supply. These herbal and pharmaceutical methods for stimulating milk supply will not be particularly effective unless combined with frequent nursing and/or pumping. Finally, get in touch with a La Leche League Leader or Lactation Consultant/IBCLC (in person if at all possible) who has experience with relactation. It’s great to have one-on-one support as you work through this.

For more information check out kellymom.com or the breastfeeding group here on cafemom. If reestablishing a milk supply is something you really want to do join the breastfeeding group, the ladies there are very knowledgable and helpful :) Anyway, hopefully some of that was helpful. Good luck and feel free to private message me if you have anymore questions.

Quoting NiniD:

I did, I talked to him last week, he told me to keep doing what I was doing and it would get bette. Im concered bc it hasn't changed since then. 

Yes, I was using a pump. I latched her on but I didnt seem to get her any that way. If I was only getting a little at time like that would it have been ok to switch her back and fourth from breast milk to formula to get her full? Ways to relactae? really? How? I would if I could, I was thinking it was all gone by now! 

Thank you!!


Quoting cabrandy03:

I really don't know much about formula feeding.  Have you talked to her pediatrician?

When you say you were only getting an ounce at a time when you were breastfeeding are you talking about with a pump?  Because an ounce with a pump is a very normal output, baby can get a lot more milk out then a pump can.  It's also fairly normal for it to take up to a week for your milk to come in, it dosn't mean you have to give formula.  Colostrum is all your baby needs those first days of life.  I'm not trying to make you feel guilty or anything, I just think you were given some bad informattion and wanted to make sure you knew the facts incase you ever have another baby.  If you are still interested in breastfeeding this baby, it's not to late, there are ways to relactate.  Again, not trying to put any pressure on you or make you feel guilty just wanted to let you know.



cabrandy03
by Brandy - Admin on Mar. 18, 2013 at 11:10 PM

Sorry I'm not sure whats going on but when I quoted you above, my computer was being weird and smushing all my paragraphs together.  I hope it's not too hard to read.

Here is a link to the actual article I copied and pasted:

http://kellymom.com/bf/got-milk/relactation/

And here is a link to the breastfeeding group:

http://www.cafemom.com/group/325



Tckosdk.2012
by Bronze Member on Mar. 19, 2013 at 12:49 PM

 


Quoting jobberwocky:

If its not hard it's fine. My son had yellow smelly poop on formula for awhile. Formula fed babies poop a lot more then breast fed babies.


 Not this early in the game. I breastfeed & when my baby was that age I was getting 10 to 15 poop diapers a day! Formula tends to constipate where breastmilk is a natural laxative. Once their gut is more mature (after a few months) then their poops slow down to one every couple days to once a week.

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