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Meal Planning Meal Planning

Favourite ??

Posted by on Apr. 27, 2013 at 11:41 PM
  • 26 Replies

Cookbook?

by on Apr. 27, 2013 at 11:41 PM
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Replies (1-10):
LindaClement
by on Apr. 27, 2013 at 11:41 PM

I'm currently enamoured with Laura Caulder's French Taste.

We had cheese & herb souffle, and fennel bites, out of it for dinner. Mmmmmm....

clmsmom
by on Apr. 28, 2013 at 9:26 AM
1 mom liked this
I am simple. The one cookbook I have ever used on a regular basis is a Betty Crocker. We are no nonsense kind of people and simple recipes with simple ingredients that taste good are the rules of the house. :-)
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michiganmom116
by Rhonda on Apr. 28, 2013 at 9:36 AM

I have to agree that my older BC cookbook is my favorite.  Good ol' basic food, nothing fancy or requiring processed foods.

I would love to get  my hands on "Nourishing Traditions" cookbook by Sally Fallon.

LindaClement
by on Apr. 28, 2013 at 3:56 PM

You'd like the Laura Caulder --it's real French home cooking: simple ingredients, prepared simply.

Quoting clmsmom:

I am simple. The one cookbook I have ever used on a regular basis is a Betty Crocker. We are no nonsense kind of people and simple recipes with simple ingredients that taste good are the rules of the house. :-)


LindaClement
by on Apr. 28, 2013 at 4:05 PM
1 mom liked this

Intriguing... I scanned the introduction and 'politically correct diet' section.

I've run across a lot of that research over the years, and never believed the 'low-fat, any amount of sweetener you'd like' b.s.

Strangely, in 1985, reading an old Alistair Cooke collection of lectures and essays, I read one from a keynote given to doctors at a medical conference. In the introduction, he stated 'we now know that cholesterol is NOT the issue, it's artificially saturated fats --shortening, hydrogenated oils, etc.' 

I checked the publication date more than 20 times, reading that piece. 

The book was PRINTED in 1966.

I read it at the crest of the 'lower your cholesterol and fat intake, margarine is the answer' craze...

Quoting michiganmom116:

I have to agree that my older BC cookbook is my favorite.  Good ol' basic food, nothing fancy or requiring processed foods.

I would love to get  my hands on "Nourishing Traditions" cookbook by Sally Fallon.


michiganmom116
by Rhonda on Apr. 28, 2013 at 4:44 PM

I'm diabetic and the "low-fat" push is all I've heard for the past 12 years.  Two years ago I realized that my diabetes was getting exponentially worse, the "low-fat" advice was slowly killing me, and I rebelled.  I now follow Paleo/primal low-carb/high-fat principles and I'm seeing great results in lower blood sugars, lower cholesterol, lower blood pressure (all issues in the past), yet the doctor and diabetic nutritionist continue to chew me out for eating the way I do.  I told my cousin of the frustration and she recommended Fallon's cookbook.

Quoting LindaClement:

Intriguing... I scanned the introduction and 'politically correct diet' section.

I've run across a lot of that research over the years, and never believed the 'low-fat, any amount of sweetener you'd like' b.s.

Strangely, in 1985, reading an old Alistair Cooke collection of lectures and essays, I read one from a keynote given to doctors at a medical conference. In the introduction, he stated 'we now know that cholesterol is NOT the issue, it's artificially saturated fats --shortening, hydrogenated oils, etc.' 

I checked the publication date more than 20 times, reading that piece. 

The book was PRINTED in 1966.

I read it at the crest of the 'lower your cholesterol and fat intake, margarine is the answer' craze...

Quoting michiganmom116:

I have to agree that my older BC cookbook is my favorite.  Good ol' basic food, nothing fancy or requiring processed foods.

I would love to get  my hands on "Nourishing Traditions" cookbook by Sally Fallon.



LindaClement
by on Apr. 28, 2013 at 4:53 PM

My parents have been vegetarians for more than 10 years. Recently (as a result of some unrelated testing) my dad found out that he has type II, but it's being well controlled by diet and lifestyle. But, because we're nuts in Canada, he 'gets' to go see the diabetes nutritionist anyhow... 

Who told him, unequivocally, that he MUST return to eating meat because he's diabetic. 

Why?

Because he can't have enough protein in his diet ... (let's not address the total lack of understanding of the composition of the life forms we eat...)

So, that will cure his diabetes?

Oh, no -- it's unrelated to that.

Uh...??? What?!?

Quoting michiganmom116:

I'm diabetic and the "low-fat" push is all I've heard for the past 12 years.  Two years ago I realized that my diabetes was getting exponentially worse, the "low-fat" advice was slowly killing me, and I rebelled.  I now follow Paleo/primal low-carb/high-fat principles and I'm seeing great results in lower blood sugars, lower cholesterol, lower blood pressure (all issues in the past), yet the doctor and diabetic nutritionist continue to chew me out for eating the way I do.  I told my cousin of the frustration and she recommended Fallon's cookbook.

Quoting LindaClement:

Intriguing... I scanned the introduction and 'politically correct diet' section.

I've run across a lot of that research over the years, and never believed the 'low-fat, any amount of sweetener you'd like' b.s.

Strangely, in 1985, reading an old Alistair Cooke collection of lectures and essays, I read one from a keynote given to doctors at a medical conference. In the introduction, he stated 'we now know that cholesterol is NOT the issue, it's artificially saturated fats --shortening, hydrogenated oils, etc.' 

I checked the publication date more than 20 times, reading that piece. 

The book was PRINTED in 1966.

I read it at the crest of the 'lower your cholesterol and fat intake, margarine is the answer' craze...

Quoting michiganmom116:

I have to agree that my older BC cookbook is my favorite.  Good ol' basic food, nothing fancy or requiring processed foods.

I would love to get  my hands on "Nourishing Traditions" cookbook by Sally Fallon.




michiganmom116
by Rhonda on Apr. 28, 2013 at 5:06 PM

Amazing!  My nutritionist told me to eat less meat and more carb-heavy foods  LOL  Carbs are what turn to glucose in my body and raise blood sugars!  It's insane.  She also told me that honey, jam, and pure glucose weren't enough to have on hand in case of low blood sugar episodes....I "had" to have regular soda and candy on hand.  Seriously?  SERIOUSLY???  I informed her that I do NOT even buy soda for my house because of the chemicals in it, and I don't have candy on hand because everyone else will eat it.  For goodness' sake:  honey is pure glucose/fructose, my homemade jam is pure glucose/fructose, and glucose ....speaks for itself.

Anyway, she told me to eat less meat (had no real reason), told me it was foolish to drop a whole food group from my diet (and you tell the same thing to people with celiac disease or lactose intolerance?...she had no answer to that one), and worried about my caloric intake being too high or too low (she couldn't make her mind up on that one.)  She told me that ketosis was dangerous ....um, everyone's body goes into ketosis during the night, it's normal -- ketoACIDosis was what is dangerous and is practically unheard of outside of alcoholism or sick Type 1 diabetics.  I went home and, as she suggested, plugged in my meals to myfitnesspal.com.  Know what?  I was perfectly within the caloric range she recommended for me AND my RDA was 300% - 500% daily.  I eat half the carbs a normal healthy person would eat, have plenty of energy and no signs of ketoacidosis.  I see nothing wrong with the way I'm eating, especially when I see the great results I'm getting AND it's ample nutrition.  Then again, consider who pays to educate the doctors and nutritionists:  the ones that stand to make money when people are sick...the Diabetic Association and the drug companies.

Quoting LindaClement:

My parents have been vegetarians for more than 10 years. Recently (as a result of some unrelated testing) my dad found out that he has type II, but it's being well controlled by diet and lifestyle. But, because we're nuts in Canada, he 'gets' to go see the diabetes nutritionist anyhow... 

Who told him, unequivocally, that he MUST return to eating meat because he's diabetic. 

Why?

Because he can't have enough protein in his diet ... (let's not address the total lack of understanding of the composition of the life forms we eat...)

So, that will cure his diabetes?

Oh, no -- it's unrelated to that.

Uh...??? What?!?

Quoting michiganmom116:

I'm diabetic and the "low-fat" push is all I've heard for the past 12 years.  Two years ago I realized that my diabetes was getting exponentially worse, the "low-fat" advice was slowly killing me, and I rebelled.  I now follow Paleo/primal low-carb/high-fat principles and I'm seeing great results in lower blood sugars, lower cholesterol, lower blood pressure (all issues in the past), yet the doctor and diabetic nutritionist continue to chew me out for eating the way I do.  I told my cousin of the frustration and she recommended Fallon's cookbook.

Quoting LindaClement:

Intriguing... I scanned the introduction and 'politically correct diet' section.

I've run across a lot of that research over the years, and never believed the 'low-fat, any amount of sweetener you'd like' b.s.

Strangely, in 1985, reading an old Alistair Cooke collection of lectures and essays, I read one from a keynote given to doctors at a medical conference. In the introduction, he stated 'we now know that cholesterol is NOT the issue, it's artificially saturated fats --shortening, hydrogenated oils, etc.' 

I checked the publication date more than 20 times, reading that piece. 

The book was PRINTED in 1966.

I read it at the crest of the 'lower your cholesterol and fat intake, margarine is the answer' craze...

Quoting michiganmom116:

I have to agree that my older BC cookbook is my favorite.  Good ol' basic food, nothing fancy or requiring processed foods.

I would love to get  my hands on "Nourishing Traditions" cookbook by Sally Fallon.





LindaClement
by on Apr. 28, 2013 at 5:09 PM

That, sadly, doesn't surprise me at all. I've long been extremely cynical about the quality of information dieticians and nutritionist in general are inclined to share.

I do know that every school that provides either of those educations use materials and textbooks provide (kindly, don'tcha think?) by the Dairy Bureau. 

Quoting michiganmom116:

Amazing!  My nutritionist told me to eat less meat and more carb-heavy foods  LOL  Carbs are what turn to glucose in my body and raise blood sugars!  It's insane.  She also told me that honey, jam, and pure glucose weren't enough to have on hand in case of low blood sugar episodes....I "had" to have regular soda and candy on hand.  Seriously?  SERIOUSLY???  I informed her that I do NOT even buy soda for my house because of the chemicals in it, and I don't have candy on hand because everyone else will eat it.  For goodness' sake:  honey is pure glucose/fructose, my homemade jam is pure glucose/fructose, and glucose ....speaks for itself.

Anyway, she told me to eat less meat (had no real reason), told me it was foolish to drop a whole food group from my diet (and you tell the same thing to people with celiac disease or lactose intolerance?...she had no answer to that one), and worried about my caloric intake being too high or too low (she couldn't make her mind up on that one.)  She told me that ketosis was dangerous ....um, everyone's body goes into ketosis during the night, it's normal -- ketoACIDosis was what is dangerous and is practically unheard of outside of alcoholism or sick Type 1 diabetics.  I went home and, as she suggested, plugged in my meals to myfitnesspal.com.  Know what?  I was perfectly within the caloric range she recommended for me AND my RDA was 300% - 500% daily.  I eat half the carbs a normal healthy person would eat, have plenty of energy and no signs of ketoacidosis.  I see nothing wrong with the way I'm eating, especially when I see the great results I'm getting AND it's ample nutrition.  Then again, consider who pays to educate the doctors and nutritionists:  the ones that stand to make money when people are sick...the Diabetic Association and the drug companies.

Quoting LindaClement:

My parents have been vegetarians for more than 10 years. Recently (as a result of some unrelated testing) my dad found out that he has type II, but it's being well controlled by diet and lifestyle. But, because we're nuts in Canada, he 'gets' to go see the diabetes nutritionist anyhow... 

Who told him, unequivocally, that he MUST return to eating meat because he's diabetic. 

Why?

Because he can't have enough protein in his diet ... (let's not address the total lack of understanding of the composition of the life forms we eat...)

So, that will cure his diabetes?

Oh, no -- it's unrelated to that.

Uh...??? What?!?

Quoting michiganmom116:

I'm diabetic and the "low-fat" push is all I've heard for the past 12 years.  Two years ago I realized that my diabetes was getting exponentially worse, the "low-fat" advice was slowly killing me, and I rebelled.  I now follow Paleo/primal low-carb/high-fat principles and I'm seeing great results in lower blood sugars, lower cholesterol, lower blood pressure (all issues in the past), yet the doctor and diabetic nutritionist continue to chew me out for eating the way I do.  I told my cousin of the frustration and she recommended Fallon's cookbook.

Quoting LindaClement:

Intriguing... I scanned the introduction and 'politically correct diet' section.

I've run across a lot of that research over the years, and never believed the 'low-fat, any amount of sweetener you'd like' b.s.

Strangely, in 1985, reading an old Alistair Cooke collection of lectures and essays, I read one from a keynote given to doctors at a medical conference. In the introduction, he stated 'we now know that cholesterol is NOT the issue, it's artificially saturated fats --shortening, hydrogenated oils, etc.' 

I checked the publication date more than 20 times, reading that piece. 

The book was PRINTED in 1966.

I read it at the crest of the 'lower your cholesterol and fat intake, margarine is the answer' craze...

Quoting michiganmom116:

I have to agree that my older BC cookbook is my favorite.  Good ol' basic food, nothing fancy or requiring processed foods.

I would love to get  my hands on "Nourishing Traditions" cookbook by Sally Fallon.






michiganmom116
by Rhonda on Apr. 28, 2013 at 5:14 PM
1 mom liked this

Totally unbiased info....NOT.

Quoting LindaClement:

That, sadly, doesn't surprise me at all. I've long been extremely cynical about the quality of information dieticians and nutritionist in general are inclined to share.

I do know that every school that provides either of those educations use materials and textbooks provide (kindly, don'tcha think?) by the Dairy Bureau. 

Quoting michiganmom116:


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