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propogating plants

Posted by on Feb. 4, 2013 at 1:12 PM
  • 30 Replies
1 mom liked this

does anyone do this?  I like to make some new plants from herb clippings, i've done it with roses.   I think i might try it with raspberries this yr.

by on Feb. 4, 2013 at 1:12 PM
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Replies (1-10):
kiske
by Member on Feb. 4, 2013 at 3:37 PM

Oh, you should let us know how the raspberries go.  I'm trying to get onions to root off of the cut end of storebought onions.  Pinterest swears it can be done so we shall see what luck I'll have.


kim8934
by on Feb. 4, 2013 at 3:59 PM
1 mom liked this

I believe raspberries are perennials and come back every year on their own.  Whereas, most herbs are annuals, depending on the climate you live in.  I split up raspberry plants last year and expect them to fill in more this year..  Most herbs will seed, then you can pop the seeds back into the ground and get more plants that season.  I'm not sure if an herb clipping will produce another plant.

So, long story short, perennials can be propogated and I'm not sure about annuals, but I don't think so.

RosePetalTears
by Silver Member on Feb. 4, 2013 at 4:07 PM


i know basil can be. I've done it a bunch. You just put a clipping into a glass of water till it roots then transfer into a pot of soil.   Works great!

Quoting kim8934:

I believe raspberries are perennials and come back every year on their own.  Whereas, most herbs are annuals, depending on the climate you live in.  I split up raspberry plants last year and expect them to fill in more this year..  Most herbs will seed, then you can pop the seeds back into the ground and get more plants that season.  I'm not sure if an herb clipping will produce another plant.

So, long story short, perennials can be propogated and I'm not sure about annuals, but I don't think so.



kim8934
by on Feb. 4, 2013 at 4:22 PM
1 mom liked this

interesting, I'll have to try that next year. 


Quoting RosePetalTears:

 

i know basil can be. I've done it a bunch. You just put a clipping into a glass of water till it roots then transfer into a pot of soil.   Works great!

Quoting kim8934:

I believe raspberries are perennials and come back every year on their own.  Whereas, most herbs are annuals, depending on the climate you live in.  I split up raspberry plants last year and expect them to fill in more this year..  Most herbs will seed, then you can pop the seeds back into the ground and get more plants that season.  I'm not sure if an herb clipping will produce another plant.

So, long story short, perennials can be propogated and I'm not sure about annuals, but I don't think so.

 

 


 

MonarchMom22
by Member on Feb. 4, 2013 at 4:39 PM
2 moms liked this

This is my favorite part of gardening.  When you propogate you get more plants to share and exchange.  In my experience, there are 2 types of herbs:  tender annuals that die with the frost (like basil, cilantro, dill.) and woody perenials that may die back, but can return the next year (oregano, rosemary, mint, sage)  

The tender annuals grow fast, and you can often grow from last year's seed or root a small peice of stem in water.  Basil is great for that.

The woody perennials take a bit longer to grow roots.  For those I cut a short stem from new growth.  Scrape the end a bit and dip it into rooting hormone.  Put it in a light sandy mix and keep it moist and out of the wind. Inside a sunny window is fine.  They usually root in a few weeks.  

Mint, oregano, some sages, low growing thymes can all be divided by cutting the established plant into 2 or 3 pieces in early spring.  Cut straight through to the center to make sure you get some roots with each section.  Plant right into the ground and you will have new plants.  

Best of luck

specialwingz
by Corey on Feb. 5, 2013 at 3:51 PM

I miss my raspberry bushes that I left behind in MN for my move to TX.  You should have good luck with those.

What herb plants have you propogated?

RosePetalTears
by Silver Member on Feb. 5, 2013 at 4:18 PM



Quoting specialwingz:

I miss my raspberry bushes that I left behind in MN for my move to TX.  You should have good luck with those.

What herb plants have you propogated?


i actually brought some raspberries with me from mn when i moved to co! lol.  My parents have a huge patch and we dug a few up and planted them here.

I've had really good luck with basil and ok luck with lavender.  I'm going to try others this yr.

flowrsgalore
by Member on Feb. 5, 2013 at 7:07 PM
1 mom liked this

I think you may have luck with this.  I throw those in my compost  and they seem to live all summer growing like crazy, but I have never checked to see the onion bulb part.

Quoting kiske:

Oh, you should let us know how the raspberries go.  I'm trying to get onions to root off of the cut end of storebought onions.  Pinterest swears it can be done so we shall see what luck I'll have.

 

 

matreshka
by Platinum Member on Feb. 5, 2013 at 8:48 PM

My mom did roses. I have had no success with any palnts. I think I hurried them and tried to do cutting s before they would be viable.

matreshka
by Platinum Member on Feb. 5, 2013 at 8:49 PM

This was very helpful info for me.

Quoting MonarchMom22:

This is my favorite part of gardening.  When you propogate you get more plants to share and exchange.  In my experience, there are 2 types of herbs:  tender annuals that die with the frost (like basil, cilantro, dill.) and woody perenials that may die back, but can return the next year (oregano, rosemary, mint, sage)  

The tender annuals grow fast, and you can often grow from last year's seed or root a small peice of stem in water.  Basil is great for that.

The woody perennials take a bit longer to grow roots.  For those I cut a short stem from new growth.  Scrape the end a bit and dip it into rooting hormone.  Put it in a light sandy mix and keep it moist and out of the wind. Inside a sunny window is fine.  They usually root in a few weeks.  

Mint, oregano, some sages, low growing thymes can all be divided by cutting the established plant into 2 or 3 pieces in early spring.  Cut straight through to the center to make sure you get some roots with each section.  Plant right into the ground and you will have new plants.  

Best of luck


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