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Pricing items for a yard sale

Posted by on Apr. 24, 2013 at 2:23 AM
  • 7 Replies

 We don't do much yard saleing yet, but we really need to have one.  I have no idea what to price things.  It seems we have some of everything, kids clothes and toys, computer monitors, car parts...just everything.  Any suggestions?

by on Apr. 24, 2013 at 2:23 AM
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pinkcoffeecup
by Silver Member on Apr. 24, 2013 at 7:52 AM

If your looking to get rid of it all.  People tell me price it to sell.   Or just don't put prices on anything.   Let  people make offers for things. 

AzariahsMother
by on Apr. 24, 2013 at 9:33 AM
1 mom liked this

I think it depends if your looking to make a profit or just getting the stuff out.  For me I always thing about how long have I had it, what kind of condition is it in, and what would they pay for it brand new.  

Clothes I have always priced from .50 cents to $2.00 (depending on the item)

Toys I think again it depends on what kind of toys and how used they are. 

Computer Monitor I would go cheap because people really don't like buying these used, and if it's box style changes are you will have to donate or toss.

Car parts I would think you might get more going to a junk yard. 

Good Luck on your sale.

matreshka
by Platinum Member on Apr. 24, 2013 at 9:48 AM

I don't really know either but this sounds like a good idea.  Maybe think about how much you would be willing to spend at a yard sale.

Quoting AzariahsMother:

I think it depends if your looking to make a profit or just getting the stuff out.  For me I always thing about how long have I had it, what kind of condition is it in, and what would they pay for it brand new.  

Clothes I have always priced from .50 cents to $2.00 (depending on the item)

Toys I think again it depends on what kind of toys and how used they are. 

Computer Monitor I would go cheap because people really don't like buying these used, and if it's box style changes are you will have to donate or toss.

Car parts I would think you might get more going to a junk yard. 

Good Luck on your sale.


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elijahsmama09
by on Apr. 24, 2013 at 11:10 AM

Do not put nothing on your items. Price everything, and just let everyone know that no price is set in stone. I am an avid garage saler, and one of the most annoying things is having to ask the seller how much each item is. Do not do that! If you don’t have time to price everything individually, signs are helpful, such as "all books .25 each" or "any piece of clothes $1.00", or "anything on this table .50". You also can offer the customers a deal, example: paperbacks .25 each or 5 for $1.

Beyond that:

Advertise the crap out of it. Put it in papers, free papers, online, etc. 

Make tons of signs. Another idea for signs is to use paper grocery bags to draw your signs on then fill the bottom with heavy rocks, stuff with newspaper and staple shut. Ta da! - easy, portable signs that you can just place on the ground. If you use crayon to make your signs, the lettering won't run if it gets wet. I use a permanent marker and make the lettering extra extra wide. 

Have lots of extra spare change. Lots of dollars and 5 dollars. And lots of change. 

Have lots of grocery bags for people to carry the crap out of there. 

Know when the major employers in your area get paid. If you know the biggest employer in the area only pays on the 1st of the month (or whatever) then schedule your yardsale for the following Saturday. Other people have told me the same thing about waiting until after the monthly Social Security checks come out

Another thing about pricing - I think the bigger the item, the bigger the price tag should be. Make it obvious. If you're selling a sofa - you can't expect the buyer to be looking all over for some tiny dot sticker. Take a full sheet of paper and put the price and list any good selling points or flaws: "Sofa - $200 Firm - only 3 years old - comes with 2 coordinating pillows". 

A tip from a reader: ever notice how hard a woman has to work to convince a man to stop at a yard sale? To solve this, set out an old lawn mower or power tools out front in plain view of the road, and you'll get more business. It's also smart to set up a small table with nothing but "man-things" (jars full of screws and nails, electronic parts, tools and parts of tools, etc.). This gives the men something to immerse themselves in while the women find all the real treasures.

If you are planning your yard sale on the hot day, consider selling sodas or having the kids run a lemonade stand. (Generally though, its just easier to ice-down a bunch of sodas - bought on sale of course - in a big cooler. And just sell the kind of soda you like, so you don't mind if you have leftovers.) Selling lemonade can be tricky for a 5 year old who doesn't understand a lot about hygiene - and will want to just grab ice cubes with their hands. Someone told me they once saw a child stirring a pitcher of lemonade with their ARM! On a hot day, having a pitcher of ice-water with paper cups (and trash can) available for free is a nice touch. The longer people stay at your yardsale the more likely they will buy something. And even if they just stay and browse, that's good too since it may lure others to the sale. Nothing attracts a crowd like a crowd. Some people like to set up a coffee pot and sell donuts 

 Here's a tip if you are trying to sell something that is fairly high dollar and its a popular item that appears in catalogs or sale ads. Cut out the ad with the item in it (with the price showing of course) and tape it to your item. I've seen this done mostly with gently used children's toys and such. It shows the buyer that spending $10 for an item that normally sells for $40 new is a good deal. Be selective if you use this this tactic, people will get turned off if you do it for every item you're trying to sell. 

Don't accept checks

If selling breakables, have newspaper available to wrap fragile items. Having a calculator handy is helpful in totaling up purchases. Make it easy for yourself to total items - price things evenly : .25, .50 and $1, NOT .40, .75, $1.20. Heck, even doing that, it's easy to mess things up (but that's me, I hate math!).

If you are selling electrical appliances, have an electrical outlet handy or a long extension cord. (Put the cord away when not in use - you don't want to create a tripping hazard). I don’t allow strangers in my house, either to try out appliances or try on clothes, etc. If they need to use a restroom, give them directions to the nearest fast-food restaurant. 

If you have a ton of kids's clothes or small toys you are dying to get rid of, consider having a "fill a bag for a set price" kind of deal. Yardsailors love getting a good deal. I went to one yard sale that had a "fill a bag of clothes for $2" and another one that had "fill a lunchbag of small toys" for a nickel (very cheap!) If you do something like this, just make sure you have enough bags available. 
Another option is to sort the small toys and put them in sealed clear plastic baggies according to type of toy or whether it's for a boy or girl. Then STAPLE the bags closed so customers can't open them. Then have a set price for the entire bag. That way, hopefully you won't get stuck with leftover "less desirable" toys when the sale is over.

JakeandEmmasMom
by Silver Member on Apr. 24, 2013 at 11:47 AM
1 mom liked this

 I always price to get rid of it.  The less I have to take to Goodwill afterward, the better.  For kids clothes, I usually price between 50 cents and $1.  The toys I price really cheap because I want them gone before the kids can change their minds.  The car parts, I would try to sell those on Craigslist unless they are generic parts that would work with any car.

artistic_kitty
by Member on Apr. 24, 2013 at 4:28 PM

Last garage sale I went too had...

Kids tops and pants $1 each

sweaters, jackets, dresses and full outfits $2 each

large toys $3

For larger special items you could always check ebay to see what the going price is for a similar item and then price it to sell.

caseyloo
by Casey on Apr. 24, 2013 at 4:52 PM

 Ladies thank you so much!  What great ideas.  I'm all for pricing things to move, dh...he's all about making the money.  So we'll see how it goes.

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