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Cranialsacral therapy (PIOG)

Posted by on Mar. 14, 2011 at 5:39 PM
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 Has anyone had this done?  My sons Pediatrician suggested sending my son to a Physical Therapist for this and he also did some in his office today.  He said to watch for behavior changes and I am not sure if the miserable mood my son has been in since is due to this or the fact that he has a sore throat today.  Would it be normal to have this sort of initial reaction to this therapy?  Any input is appreciated.

by on Mar. 14, 2011 at 5:39 PM
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Corinne770
by Member on Mar. 14, 2011 at 6:48 PM

Hello,

My name is Corinne. My son is seven year's old. He goes to a school that has occupational therapy and physical therapy combined. My son first started a year and a half ago from now. I heard him screaming back there and I became upset listening through the wall and about to cry.,a very nice christian mom that I know now from the therapy place, told me not to worry that it is normal at the beginning for this to happen. I thought her child had it better also being a couple of year's younger, but just last week he has been screaming with melt downs once again. My son was going smoothe than hit a time where he screamed now okay again. Right now with my son's physical therapy he is having to march the next step will be to put his elbow to his knee while marching according to his o/t therapist (owner of school) this helps even out there brain for the rest of his life. His teacher is also doing the eye patch and ear phones which is suppose to help his brain level out for the rest of his life. If you happen to get your little boy in o/t and physical therapy it is normal for them to wet the bed every once and awhile. They said even their older ones do. This has worked wonders for my son we can go places without melt downs and his confidence is so much better. He smiles more and so do we. There are still sad day's, but so much better. 

There was this one little girl that started there that use to scream really bad. She's three. They had to really work with her. I can imagine her throat being sore. The teacher's are really patient and helpful with parents. The teachers say the therapys never as fast as parent's would like it to be. The one with the little girl and my little boy their guessing we will be there for 3 yrs. One teenager has been going since she was a baby.  I hope this helps. Let me know if you have anymore questions. I sit out there 2 hrs a day- with speech also.

cutie222
by New Member on Mar. 14, 2011 at 7:03 PM

 Now I am really confused.  Since all I thought the Physical Therapy involved was manipulations of the cranialsacral.  What is all this elbow to the knee stuff about?  My son already goes to speech and occupational therapy every week for sensory issues and a language processing disorder.  Although we will be able to do the physical therapy at the same place.  All the Pediatrician did was put his hands on different areas of the scalp and temple areas.  But my son got very agitated while his hands were in one specific spot which he told me affects behavior.  As for the sore throat that was initially the reason for our visit today.  But since his Pediatrician has been working with my son and has him on a special diet for food intolerances and leaky gut syndrome he has been trying to come up with other things to help with my sons behavioral issues.  I guess since this is so new to me I am even more confused.  LOL. So any info you can give me is appreciated.  Are there any good books on this subject out there that I can read?

Quoting Corinne770:

Hello,

My name is Corinne. My son is seven year's old. He goes to a school that has occupational therapy and physical therapy combined. My son first started a year and a half ago from now. I heard him screaming back there and I became upset listening through the wall and about to cry.,a very nice christian mom that I know now from the therapy place, told me not to worry that it is normal at the beginning for this to happen. I thought her child had it better also being a couple of year's younger, but just last week he has been screaming with melt downs once again. My son was going smoothe than hit a time where he screamed now okay again. Right now with my son's physical therapy he is having to march the next step will be to put his elbow to his knee while marching according to his o/t therapist (owner of school) this helps even out there brain for the rest of his life. His teacher is also doing the eye patch and ear phones which is suppose to help his brain level out for the rest of his life. If you happen to get your little boy in o/t and physical therapy it is normal for them to wet the bed every once and awhile. They said even their older ones do. This has worked wonders for my son we can go places without melt downs and his confidence is so much better. He smiles more and so do we. There are still sad day's, but so much better. 

There was this one little girl that started there that use to scream really bad. She's three. They had to really work with her. I can imagine her throat being sore. The teacher's are really patient and helpful with parents. The teachers say the therapys never as fast as parent's would like it to be. The one with the little girl and my little boy their guessing we will be there for 3 yrs. One teenager has been going since she was a baby.  I hope this helps. Let me know if you have anymore questions. I sit out there 2 hrs a day- with speech also.

 

Corinne770
by Member on Mar. 14, 2011 at 11:14 PM

I'm sorry now I'm starting to get confused if I know the difference in the therapies. My son also gets dry brushed to help him calm down among other calming methods maybe thats the physical therapy part. I have heard that all three of these work very well. Diet? It sounds you have a good Pediatrician mine didn't touch that one when I asked him so I'm looking for someone who will treat in that area for gluten and casien. I just know he acts better from a lot of angles with a special diet. 

mtnmama111
by New Member on Mar. 14, 2011 at 11:25 PM
My friend did this with her daughter and she says they had good success with it. It seems a bit woohoo for me.. I have been hesitant.
cutie222
by New Member on Mar. 14, 2011 at 11:34 PM

 Actually I think the dry brushing is an Occupational therapy thing to calm down.  Since my sons Psychologist suggested I ask his OT about doing this because he was getting so overstimulated at his Occupational therapy.

Quoting Corinne770:

I'm sorry now I'm starting to get confused if I know the difference in the therapies. My son also gets dry brushed to help him calm down among other calming methods maybe thats the physical therapy part. I have heard that all three of these work very well. Diet? It sounds you have a good Pediatrician mine didn't touch that one when I asked him so I'm looking for someone who will treat in that area for gluten and casien. I just know he acts better from a lot of angles with a special diet. 

 

cutie222
by New Member on Jul. 6, 2011 at 2:19 PM

bumpJust thought I would bump this to see if I could get any new info.  Since we haven't tried it yet but the Dr. again suggested it so I am just waiting for them to call and schedule our first appt.   

KatyTylersMom
by New Member on Jan. 3, 2013 at 6:15 PM

Hi, I used to be a licensed massage therapist in MD and I studied CranioSacral therapy so I can give some basic answers.  First off, you can always check out www.upledger.com to find out more about CranioSacral therapy and where to find a therapist in your area etc.  John Upledger is the creator of the therapy and his institute now offers training courses all over the country. 

At it's roots, craniosacral therapy is the gentle (VERY VERY GENTLE) manipulation of the bones of the skull (cranium) and spine through the sacrum (sacral).  The idea is that even though our skulls are made up of 6 bone plates which gradually fuse together, at the joining points, called sutures, which actually look a lot like someone zipped the bones together, there is still movement allowed so the bones can slightly bend and flex at these junctions. 

So what happens if you get hit by a car and you really smash up your head?  Well, much the same thing that would happen if you smashed up your arm or leg - you form scar tissue in the areas.  Now in your arm or leg you might have OT/PT to regain movement and flexibility but in your head they say oh well it's just bone, so long as your brain didn't swell too much it's all good.  The problem is this: the flow of cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) is much like blood flow - it gets pumped down to your sacrum and then back up to your brain in kind of a wave.  So if suddenly things aren't allowed to expand and contract due to injury and the resultant scar tissues, you get a system that is restricted and can result in headaches, or even impaired brain or nerve functioning. 

For autistic kids (of which I have two myself, a son and daughter diagnosed with PDD-NOS) the idea is that something is gumming up the works in their craniosacral system.  Be it inflammation from vaccines, food allergies, viruses, yeast, etc. these kids have highly restricted craniosacral systems which not only make them feel miserable with chronic headaches and tension, but also impacts the blood flow and CSF flow in their brains which results in the brain not working as well as it could.  So the practitioner uses extremely light touch (we were taught to apply pressure equal to the weight of a NICKLE when working with anyone, adult or child) to gently encourage the healthy range of motion each individual or set of bones in the skull, spine, and sacrum should have. This technique can be applied to non-bone areas of the body too such as the abdomen or anywhere really to release patterns of tension caused by injuries or musculoskeletal dysfunction. 

Having had a lot of CST (craniosacral therapy) myself in the past I can tell you that after the first session or two you can tend to feel extra achey and generally tired and crappy:)  In many ways it's like your first massage when you're super banged up and sore - you're getting a lot of layers off in the first few sessions and that leads to a lot of gunk (be it lactic acid in muscles or what have you) needing to be processed by the body and eliminated.  Kids tend to need shorter sessions and someone who is VERY VERY practiced and familiar with CST because kids don't hold still:)  That being said when I work on my own kids I find that they go very quiet and still (NOT something my daughter does normally... ever... ) and they really seem to be "listening" with their whole body for something.  And just when I feel like we're wrapping up and their bodies are done making the bigger adjustments they needed, that's when they'll pop up and hop off my lap. 

Anyhow, TLDR version is CST is great, I have performed it and enjoyed receiving it myself, I do it with my two ASD kids from time to time and it helps them, make sure your practitioner is VERY familiar with children and has a kid-friendly area to do the work. 

newmommy430
by New Member on Jan. 3, 2013 at 6:53 PM
When I first heard about it, I thought it was kind of wacky, but since my son's insurance covers it and there's no harm, I started the therapy. My son has been going for a while and I can't say if it helps or not because I have also been doing the diet, supplements, and other therapies. I can tell you that he is very calm and relaxed after. He will also listen and follow direction better.


I like how you explain it.


Quoting KatyTylersMom:

Hi, I used to be a licensed massage therapist in MD and I studied CranioSacral therapy so I can give some basic answers.  First off, you can always check out www.upledger.com to find out more about CranioSacral therapy and where to find a therapist in your area etc.  John Upledger is the creator of the therapy and his institute now offers training courses all over the country. 

At it's roots, craniosacral therapy is the gentle (VERY VERY GENTLE) manipulation of the bones of the skull (cranium) and spine through the sacrum (sacral).  The idea is that even though our skulls are made up of 6 bone plates which gradually fuse together, at the joining points, called sutures, which actually look a lot like someone zipped the bones together, there is still movement allowed so the bones can slightly bend and flex at these junctions. 

So what happens if you get hit by a car and you really smash up your head?  Well, much the same thing that would happen if you smashed up your arm or leg - you form scar tissue in the areas.  Now in your arm or leg you might have OT/PT to regain movement and flexibility but in your head they say oh well it's just bone, so long as your brain didn't swell too much it's all good.  The problem is this: the flow of cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) is much like blood flow - it gets pumped down to your sacrum and then back up to your brain in kind of a wave.  So if suddenly things aren't allowed to expand and contract due to injury and the resultant scar tissues, you get a system that is restricted and can result in headaches, or even impaired brain or nerve functioning. 

For autistic kids (of which I have two myself, a son and daughter diagnosed with PDD-NOS) the idea is that something is gumming up the works in their craniosacral system.  Be it inflammation from vaccines, food allergies, viruses, yeast, etc. these kids have highly restricted craniosacral systems which not only make them feel miserable with chronic headaches and tension, but also impacts the blood flow and CSF flow in their brains which results in the brain not working as well as it could.  So the practitioner uses extremely light touch (we were taught to apply pressure equal to the weight of a NICKLE when working with anyone, adult or child) to gently encourage the healthy range of motion each individual or set of bones in the skull, spine, and sacrum should have. This technique can be applied to non-bone areas of the body too such as the abdomen or anywhere really to release patterns of tension caused by injuries or musculoskeletal dysfunction. 

Having had a lot of CST (craniosacral therapy) myself in the past I can tell you that after the first session or two you can tend to feel extra achey and generally tired and crappy:)  In many ways it's like your first massage when you're super banged up and sore - you're getting a lot of layers off in the first few sessions and that leads to a lot of gunk (be it lactic acid in muscles or what have you) needing to be processed by the body and eliminated.  Kids tend to need shorter sessions and someone who is VERY VERY practiced and familiar with CST because kids don't hold still:)  That being said when I work on my own kids I find that they go very quiet and still (NOT something my daughter does normally... ever... ) and they really seem to be "listening" with their whole body for something.  And just when I feel like we're wrapping up and their bodies are done making the bigger adjustments they needed, that's when they'll pop up and hop off my lap. 

Anyhow, TLDR version is CST is great, I have performed it and enjoyed receiving it myself, I do it with my two ASD kids from time to time and it helps them, make sure your practitioner is VERY familiar with children and has a kid-friendly area to do the work. 

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