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Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

Mild Aspie?????

Posted by on Jan. 24, 2011 at 3:08 PM
  • 10 Replies

 What is your opinion on this????   What does this mean to you???  

I believe my son falls into this catagory. And was wondering if anyone else had kids who are similar.

My ds 12 is very literal.  He doesnt get sarcasm at all.  I usually have to explain it to him. Everything has to be just so.  He is a very routine sort of kid.  You can disrupt his routine if you give him proper notice and he can be real go with the flow if he knows in advance.   He has obsessions but they change.  For 3 years it was professional sports now its computer games and technology.  

As a young child he never used imaginitive play at all. He never played pretend never played with action figures always focused on one particular thing.   In early elementary school kids thought he was different and didnt include him in activities..

Now at 12 with the assistance of the school he is doing fantastic he is no longer so socially awkward(still a little) he has the maturity of a 9 year old (I am guessing) and he is accepted by his peers and team mates.  Its been a long road but we are improving and I continue to hope to do so.

He is the most loving and fun kid when he wants to be and is friendly and helpful and well mannered and in general wonderful to be around.....

Just wondering if anyone else has a child like this?

Lilypie - Personal pictureLilypie Second Birthday tickers
by on Jan. 24, 2011 at 3:08 PM
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Replies (1-10):
mallowcup17
by on Jan. 24, 2011 at 3:18 PM

he sounds exactly like my sd, who they have tentatively diagnosed with adhd. 

she has no imagination unless it's forced, is extremely socially awkward.

i wonder if that's what is going on.

it's so frustrating not having a diagnosis and to them continue to flip flop between them and treatments. its not doing anyone any good. 

Homeschoolmom99
by on Jan. 24, 2011 at 3:45 PM

 There is no mild aspie! Sounds like you have an aspie! Have you read Hitchhiking through Aspergers?

Majicaleve
by on Jan. 24, 2011 at 4:40 PM

 This is so my son to a tee, he is only 9.  only difference is he only plays with action figures ANYTHING ARMY anything I mean down to his underwear lol.  Eats his toast into shape of guns etc, you get the idea.

He has been in spec ed since grade one and still only functioning at a grade 1 level and I went to his spec ed Teacher 2 years ago and suggested Autism due to his huge obsession with anything army, and he said NO sorry don't see the signs ,.  WELL now my youngest son, 4, we diagnosed with moderate Autism this past August and the Spec ed Teacher is so sorry for not listening to me all those years ago about my 9 year old.  NOW we are having a hard time getting any dr to listen to us as he is 9 and they want to wait about 2 more years to do more testing.  WHT is with that why wait. He needs the help NOW.

His behaviour is getting out of control, we don't know what to do, his sense of HA HA is non existant, does not understand joke, sarcasim, and can't lie, ( not a bad thing)  He has absolutely no concept of time or time management, no memory of anything besides army anything, he educated our grade 11 son on the history of WAR dating back to the civil war and Paton, I don't even know any of this.  But the child can't zip a zipper or write his name.

He memorizes cheat codes for his video games but cant count money to save himself.

UGGHHHHH  WHY WON"T THEY LISTEN to us the first time around.

Lets chat lol

mj94
by on Jan. 25, 2011 at 10:55 AM

My son is 15 and is diagnosed with high functioing autism.  This sounds so much like him. He's a great kid.  He also does not get sarcasm and needs things like this explained to him.  He also sometimes misunderstands what kids mean if they call him quiet or shy.  Sometimes he takes it negatively and needs an explanation.  He really wants to be a part of things but doesn't always know how.  He also becomes obsessed with certian things but they change over time and he has never engaged in pretend play.  He's had acionn figures, buses, toy cars, etc... but rather then playing with them he would twist and turn them and jump around with them. Hard to explain.  One of the best things for him has been joining the track and field team, first in middle school and now in high school.  It's been a great sport for him and he's good at it. Especially cross country running, but he loves it all.  The kids are great and accepting and so are the coaches.  He does well in school with  the right teachers but once in a while we get one who in not flexable and doesn't understand his disability.  He struggles with mid term type testing and state testing.  If he has a guide he can study from he aces the tests, if not it's much more difficult for him.  ELA and reading have been hard when he has to write paragraphs or answer open-ended questions or questions about how someone felt,etc...  If something has a concrete answer he does much better.  Sorry to go on and on.  Maybe you can relate to some of this.  He is also behind for his age as far as maturity goes.  He's 15 but more like 12.  He is an awesome kid!!

Maria

peacemakermom
by on Jan. 25, 2011 at 11:07 AM

My Aspie is 22!  And your son sounds so much like mine.  That's not to say that he doesn't still have the occasional melt-down or that he acts his age (he does not, he acts about 12-15 most of the time) but he is charming, funny, well spoken and he now holds a job!  Still he does not get sarcasm or social cues and he does not have friends, per se.  He has a few other Aspies that he knows from school that he stays in touch with occasionally, but my 13 yr. old son is really his best bud.  Sadly, my 13yr. old and my 15 yr. old daughter have much more savy and street smarts than my Aspie and now they are starting to see it themselves. On the flip side, they know a lot about compassion and acceptance.  My Aspie learned to drive when he was 21 and he does work part time for the state.  Will he ever move out? I have no idea.  It frustrates my husband who still wants him to just be normal but on the other hand, I will always have someone to stay home and watch the dog!  It has been a really long road to get here and let me say that puberty was no picnic!  But the best advice I can give anyone is never give up, never give in and don't take no for an answer from any professionals!  They know so much more now than they did even 5 years ago, that it is amazing.  I always remind my son that he has an illness, it does not have him.  A good therapist and a good psychiatrist can be your whole family's salvation!boy kissing mom

Mom2jngnc
by on Jan. 25, 2011 at 1:22 PM

 Mine is almost most 16 and was dxed at 12.... sounds like him :) good luck...

navyjen
by Gold Member on Jan. 25, 2011 at 1:32 PM

 Thanks alot for commenting ladies.   It just really boggles my mind.   

mj94
by on Jan. 26, 2011 at 8:33 AM

Thanks so much for your post.  My son is 15 and his dx is high functioning autism.  Your son reminds me of him and gives me hope for the future.  It seems a lot of people always want to focus on what he "can't" do.  It been a long hard road from pre-school till now.  We've had a lot of great caring and helpful teachers, doctors, etc... along the way and a few not so great.  we've now got a great psychiatrist and some really great teachers as well as his track coach (who also happens to be the high school psychologist) .   He's been able to accomplishh so much with the right people in his life.  What a difference it makes.  I loved reading about all your son is doing now.  He sounds like a really awesome young man! 

 

 

Maria   =)

Juniper53098
by on Jan. 26, 2011 at 10:39 AM

I agree that it may be Aspergers.  My son was diagnosed last July and is very similar.  No one took me seriously when I suggested it before March, when I couldn't handle the meltdowns anymore.  Even the Wisconsin Early Autism Project therapist didn't see it at our 1st meeting.

I don't look at Aspergers as a disease or disorder.  In my opinion, it is just a different way of thinking.  My job is not to change him, but to help him learn how to fit in and understand how everyone else thinks.  It is also my job to learn how he thinks.

I also recommend the book "Parenting a child with Asperger Syndrome 200 Tips and Strategies" by Brenda Boyd.  I read it when we 1st go our diagnosis and need to read it again, now that he's been in therapy for a few months.

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navyjen
by Gold Member on Jan. 26, 2011 at 10:40 AM

 

Quoting Juniper53098:

I agree that it may be Aspergers.  My son was diagnosed last July and is very similar.  No one took me seriously when I suggested it before March, when I couldn't handle the meltdowns anymore.  Even the Wisconsin Early Autism Project therapist didn't see it at our 1st meeting.

I don't look at Aspergers as a disease or disorder.  In my opinion, it is just a different way of thinking.  My job is not to change him, but to help him learn how to fit in and understand how everyone else thinks.  It is also my job to learn how he thinks.

 I like the way you think and feel about this to.  That has always been how I kinda looked at it.   He does think differently and once you get how he thinks well you get him.   

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