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Does your child exhibit these classic symptoms they use for diagnosis?

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 Does your child exhibit these classic symptoms they use for diagnosis?

Since I have more that one I answered below :)

I thought this might help new members who are trying to decide if their children have autism or not.  Many times if a child doesn't exhibit a couple of these, they want to conclude that their child can't have autism.  I know I thought this in the early days too.  You want to cling to anything. I wish I could have seen that there are many autistic people that  do only a handful of the things on this list.  It would have made me accept it sooner.  By showing that your child doesn't have to have all of them to have autism, maybe a mom might realize the list is not all inclusive. 

I also think it is interesting to see the similiarites and differences between our children.  I know my 3 are so different.

Some autistic traits could include:

  • Scatter/splinter skills of abilities –
    • such as poor gross motor or fine motor skills and the ability to read at a very young age
  • Oversensitive or under sensitive to pain
  • Desire for the same daily schedule, toys, type of clothes or an insistent on “sameness”
  • Repeating words, phrases in place of typical language or conversation (This is known as echolalia)
  • Much difficulty expressing needs – they may use pointing, gestures versus words, or tantrums
  • Finding situations funny or laughing at times when it is inappropriate (i.e., laughing at a baby crying.)
  • Activity is noticeably under active or over active
  • Excessive or frequent tantrums
  • Can be aggressive or self injurious
  • Prefers to be alone – may have social skills deficits
  • Autistics can act deaf or be non responsive to verbal cues
  • Odd play such as; spinning objects, or using toys for something besides there their intended purpose or using an odd attraction to an item that is inappropriate for age
  • Non existent or poor eye contact
  • Non responsive to typical teaching methods
  • May respond negatively to crowds or not able to mix well with others
  • Difficulty with holding a conversation
  • May not like hugs, or to be cuddled.
  • Sensitivity to loud noises, tags in clothes, coarse clothing, lights, and smells
  • Frequently uses peripheral vision to track items (e.g., rolling car along countertop at eye-level)
  • Highly self-limited diet (narrow down foods they’ll eat to a very limited few items when previously a broader range was accepted (e.g., bread, chicken nuggets, cheese, milk, and crackers – period.)
  • A high amount of severe food allergies
  • History of chronic ear infections as an infant
  • Severe gastro-intestinal issues; chronic loose and/or foul-smelling stools.
  • Lack of imaginative play or imitation.
by on Dec. 8, 2011 at 10:46 AM
Replies (11-20):
JohnnyCakes
by Member on Dec. 8, 2011 at 11:31 AM

A great PT makes all the difference! We've had our fair share of crappy ones, ugh. Even at big places like Childrens where you'd think they'd be the best of the best. 

Quoting britniwheeler:

 I agree with you totally. We were lucky when we came across our current psychologist. He specializes in Autism and really understands what we are going through. Many of the other professionals that Douglas is working with want to push him out of the programs because he is doing well with the one on one therapies. He was only in Physical Therapy for two days and she said she wanted to phase him out. Yet, he still lays on the table to do his home work and clearly is struggling with poor core muscles in his daily life. He also is still having an issue with the femoral anteversion and is being seen by an pediatric orthopedic specialist for pronation. Those are things she could be working on. Why would the evaluation come to say that he needs 4 months of PT, then after two 1 hour sessions you say he could be done soon?! Seriously. It is irritating that people just don't understand. Enviroments and time of the day make a big difference with these kids. How my son acts in school isn't how he is acting in therapy. Symptoms get overlooked so often by many professionals my son is working with. It makes me want to scream!

Quoting ROGUEM:

 This frustrates me too.  Many professionals forget or just don't understand that our kids have very skeltered skills.  They can have high IQ's and  not be able to dress themselves.  That is a main part of their disability.  These professionals tend to forget to look at  the whole picture rather than focusing on the one skill they excel at.

Quoting britniwheeler:

 You know some thing I find VERY annoying.... I was able to teach my son how to read at age 4. He picked it up very easily and reads large words. He is now 7 and has been in his top reading groups since he started school. He is also very good with numbers. People think that just because he is verbal and can read that he is high functioning. His IQ scores were so varied that it showed what we had been trying to say all a long. He is moderate to low functioning in memory, processing speed and daily living. I wish people had a better understanding of Autism. Just because some one can read does not mean that he is high functioning or doesn't have Autism at all. (I have gotten these comments all too often).

My son really meets all of these. It is incredible that we didn't notice some of this stuff sooner. The only thing that our son doesn't do is throw temper tantrums. He is the opposite of aggressive. He whines and cries way too much about the dumbest stuff or what appears to be nothing, but never forceful temper tantrums. It goes to show that every child on the spectrum is different.

 

 


Parenting
Raysbaby79
by on Dec. 8, 2011 at 11:31 AM

I am actually trying to get thte doctors to see that my daughter has issues.  She has missed all milestones and is 4 almost 5 and jsut starting to talk.  Tantrums are awful.  She has times (like 2 week spans where she does not even touch a toy.)  She sits all day with a pen or pencil and paper and draws circles on lined paper.  All in a row and almost perfect circles.  I have 4 children.  My four year old is the third one you would think that a family doctor would listen to a mother when she tells them something is not right.  But I am just now getting help that should have been given long before now.

nicksmom217
by on Dec. 8, 2011 at 11:36 AM

   most of this, definitely nick' narrow food choices, specific cloth, the way, room and everything in the room has to be, very narrow interest, obsession with one interest, know everything there is to know about this subject, anxiety to crawd and loud places, problems making friends or keeping conversation going about different topics,very hard to learn in mainstream way in school, problems sleeping, eye contact with people, easier to have conversation with adults then kids his age,taking things literally, repetitive behavior, some of what , nick has, with HFA.

aidensmomma508
by Wendy on Dec. 8, 2011 at 11:59 AM

Some autistic traits could include:

  • Scatter/splinter skills of abilities –
    • such as poor gross motor or fine motor skills and the ability to read at a very young age no
  • Oversensitive or under sensitive to pain yes
  • Desire for the same daily schedule, toys, type of clothes or an insistent on “sameness” no
  • Repeating words, phrases in place of typical language or conversation (This is known as echolalia) no
  • Much difficulty expressing needs – they may use pointing, gestures versus words, or tantrums yes
  • Finding situations funny or laughing at times when it is inappropriate (i.e., laughing at a baby crying.) no
  • Activity is noticeably under active or over active no
  • Excessive or frequent tantrums yes
  • Can be aggressive or self injurious yes
  • Prefers to be alone – may have social skills deficits no
  • Autistics can act deaf or be non responsive to verbal cues no
  • Odd play such as; spinning objects, or using toys for something besides there their intended purpose or using an odd attraction to an item that is inappropriate for age no
  • Non existent or poor eye contact no
  • Non responsive to typical teaching methods no
  • May respond negatively to crowds or not able to mix well with others no
  • Difficulty with holding a conversation yes
  • May not like hugs, or to be cuddled.no
  • Sensitivity to loud noises, tags in clothes, coarse clothing, lights, and smells yes
  • Frequently uses peripheral vision to track items (e.g., rolling car along countertop at eye-level)no
  • Highly self-limited diet (narrow down foods they’ll eat to a very limited few items when previously a broader range was accepted (e.g., bread, chicken nuggets, cheese, milk, and crackers – period.) yes
  • A high amount of severe food allergies no
  • History of chronic ear infections as an infant no
  • Severe gastro-intestinal issues; chronic loose and/or foul-smelling stools. no
  • Lack of imaginative play or imitation. yes
DyerMaker
by Bronze Member on Dec. 8, 2011 at 12:10 PM
  • Scatter/splinter skills of abilities –
    • such as poor gross motor or fine motor skills and the ability to read at a very young age
  • Oversensitive or under sensitive to pain
  • Desire for the same daily schedule, toys, type of clothes or an insistent on “sameness”
  • Repeating words, phrases in place of typical language or conversation (This is known as echolalia)
  • Much difficulty expressing needs – they may use pointing, gestures versus words, or tantrums
  • Finding situations funny or laughing at times when it is inappropriate (i.e., laughing at a baby crying.)
  • Activity is noticeably under active or over active
  • Excessive or frequent tantrums
  • Can be aggressive or self injurious
  • Prefers to be alone – may have social skills deficits
  • Autistics can act deaf or be non responsive to verbal cues
  • Odd play such as; spinning objects, or using toys for something besides there their intended purpose or using an odd attraction to an item that is inappropriate for age
  • Non existent or poor eye contact
  • Non responsive to typical teaching methods
  • May respond negatively to crowds or not able to mix well with others
  • Difficulty with holding a conversation
  • May not like hugs, or to be cuddled.
  • Sensitivity to loud noises, tags in clothes, coarse clothing, lights, and smells
  • Frequently uses peripheral vision to track items (e.g., rolling car along countertop at eye-level)
  • Highly self-limited diet (narrow down foods they’ll eat to a very limited few items when previously a broader range was accepted (e.g., bread, chicken nuggets, cheese, milk, and crackers – period.)
  • A high amount of severe food allergies
  • History of chronic ear infections as an infant
  • Severe gastro-intestinal issues; chronic loose and/or foul-smelling stools.
  • Lack of imaginative play or imitation.
jana4
by on Dec. 9, 2011 at 7:48 AM

I have one child out of 4 on the spectrum...Jake will be 3 Feb. 4th

Some autistic traits could include:

  • Scatter/splinter skills of abilities –
    • such as poor gross motor or fine motor skills and the ability to read at a very young age yes
  • Oversensitive or under sensitive to pain Under sensitive to pain
  • Desire for the same daily schedule, toys, type of clothes or an insistent on “sameness” Sometimes
  • Repeating words, phrases in place of typical language or conversation (This is known as echolalia) Just started saying a few words...so not yet
  • Much difficulty expressing needs – they may use pointing, gestures versus words, or tantrums YES...tantrums
  • Finding situations funny or laughing at times when it is inappropriate (i.e., laughing at a baby crying.) He does this...laughs at things that others wouldn't find funny or just random laughing
  • Activity is noticeably under active or over active Over active
  • Excessive or frequent tantrums Frequent tantrums
  • Can be aggressive or self injurious Aggressive but not self injurious
  • Prefers to be alone – may have social skills deficits Prefers to be alone
  • Autistics can act deaf or be non responsive to verbal cues  Yes, if involved he seems like he has a hearing issue
  • Odd play such as; spinning objects, or using toys for something besides there their intended purpose or using an odd attraction to an item that is inappropriate for age Spinning himself and toys and enjoys things in print like newspapers, Kroger ads and the phone book -- will look at these for hours if allowed
  • Non existent or poor eye contact Poor eye contact but this is improving
  • Non responsive to typical teaching methods Yes
  • May respond negatively to crowds or not able to mix well with others Cries, stimms and has major meltdown if in a crowd for too long
  • Difficulty with holding a conversation He is just learning to talk
  • May not like hugs, or to be cuddled. Jake likes to be hugged but won't give them and hates to be cuddled!
  • Sensitivity to loud noises, tags in clothes, coarse clothing, lights, and smells Does not respond to most loud noises but if he does he cries, loves lights and doesn't have issues with clothes yet and doesn't seem to notice smells
  • Frequently uses peripheral vision to track items (e.g., rolling car along countertop at eye-level) YES!!  All the time!!
  • Highly self-limited diet (narrow down foods they’ll eat to a very limited few items when previously a broader range was accepted (e.g., bread, chicken nuggets, cheese, milk, and crackers – period.) Jakes seems afraid of new foods
  • A high amount of severe food allergies None to date
  • History of chronic ear infections as an infant No
  • Severe gastro-intestinal issues; chronic loose and/or foul-smelling stools. Yes
  • Lack of imaginative play or imitation. Yes, this has been a problem but he is doing a little bit of it now, thanks to therapy!!

Great list!!  Really made me take time to see how far Jake has come since his dx in this past June

SissyTray
by on Dec. 9, 2011 at 8:42 AM
  • Scatter/splinter skills of abilities –
    • such as poor gross motor or fine motor skills and the ability to read at a very young age Yes, especially her handwriting...it looks like a kindergartener's not a 7th grader's
  • Oversensitive or under sensitive to pain Yes, very oversensitive, every little bump or scratch is a dire emergency
  • Desire for the same daily schedule, toys, type of clothes or an insistent on “sameness” Yes
  • Repeating words, phrases in place of typical language or conversation (This is known as echolalia) No
  • Much difficulty expressing needs – they may use pointing, gestures versus words, or tantrums Yes; until she was two and a half she was non-verbal using only pointing and grunts to express wants and needs, then between the ages of 3 and 6, she threw MAJOR tantrums. One tantrum was so bad when she was with my mom, that my mom, who has been an RN for 25yrs,  thought she was having a seizure! She still throws tantrums, but they are not as severe.
  • Finding situations funny or laughing at times when it is inappropriate (i.e., laughing at a baby crying.) Yes; it is very difficult to explain to others why she does this, so it is frustrating when other mothers or kids think she is being mean
  • Activity is noticeably under active or over active Yes, she is very over active and has a hard time sitting still; she always has to be doing something
  • Excessive or frequent tantrums Yes
  • Can be aggressive or self injurious At times she can be aggressive, but more so she is emotionally hypersensitive and the smallest thing can set off a crying fit or a no one likes/loves me whining session
  • Prefers to be alone – may have social skills deficits Yes. It is very hard for her to make and keep friends. She can and does spend hours on end by herself. Whether it is shooting hoops, riding her bike, playing video games, etc., she would rather do things alone.
  • Autistics can act deaf or be non responsive to verbal cues Yes. It used to piss dh off because he thought she was just ignoring him and would just stare at him like she couldn't hear a thing, still does this, but not as often
  • Odd play such as; spinning objects, or using toys for something besides there their intended purpose or using an odd attraction to an item that is inappropriate for age Yes
  • Non existent or poor eye contact  Yes
  • Non responsive to typical teaching methods Yes
  • May respond negatively to crowds or not able to mix well with others Yes
  • Difficulty with holding a conversation Not anymore
  • May not like hugs, or to be cuddled. No; she is very affectionate, but typically only if she initiates the affection.
  • Sensitivity to loud noises, tags in clothes, coarse clothing, lights, and smells Yes extremely
  • Frequently uses peripheral vision to track items (e.g., rolling car along countertop at eye-level) Yes
  • Highly self-limited diet (narrow down foods they’ll eat to a very limited few items when previously a broader range was accepted (e.g., bread, chicken nuggets, cheese, milk, and crackers – period.) Yes; for the longest time it was PB & J only, then it was cereal for every meal, then only ramen noodles; right now she is back in her ramen noodle phase
  • A high amount of severe food allergies No, as far as we know she is only allergic to coconut
  • History of chronic ear infections as an infant Yes, she had to have tubes put in when she was 2 1/2. It was very traumatic for her. :(
  • Severe gastro-intestinal issues; chronic loose and/or foul-smelling stools. Yes, but instead of loose stools, she gets extremely constipated
  • Lack of imaginative play or imitation. No
LIMom1105
by Silver Member on Dec. 9, 2011 at 8:45 AM
Yes, there were a few signs (that seem to be overly emphasized on some lists) that my son did not exhibit much at all. Poor eye contact is one, speech delays (he had a delay, but his speech exploded after 2), and he loves hugs, a little too much at times which I didn't realize was a symptom. So yes, I fooled myself for awhile, but I also didn't come across more comprehensive lists like this until my son was older. I really was baffled for quite awhile about what was going on with him, and not even EI noticed either.
Marcy_182
by Bronze Member on Dec. 9, 2011 at 9:50 AM

My son is only oversensitive or undesensitive to paini think sometimes, and lots of ear infections.

he was diagnosed at age 2 he is now 3 1/2 sometimes i wonder if ASD is the right diagnosis, but in the meantime we work with him as if he is.




Vg2000
by on Dec. 9, 2011 at 10:00 AM
Hi Cafe moms this is my first post ever, yes my son had many of the symptoms on the list, he was diagnosed with PDD NoS at age 23 months, he continues to show some senstivities but he has made great strides. To all my fellow moms who know the joys and pains of having child my hat goes off to you, someday my wish is that this symptom list will be considered "normal"
VG
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