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Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

Does your child exhibit these classic symptoms they use for diagnosis?

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 Does your child exhibit these classic symptoms they use for diagnosis?

Since I have more that one I answered below :)

I thought this might help new members who are trying to decide if their children have autism or not.  Many times if a child doesn't exhibit a couple of these, they want to conclude that their child can't have autism.  I know I thought this in the early days too.  You want to cling to anything. I wish I could have seen that there are many autistic people that  do only a handful of the things on this list.  It would have made me accept it sooner.  By showing that your child doesn't have to have all of them to have autism, maybe a mom might realize the list is not all inclusive. 

I also think it is interesting to see the similiarites and differences between our children.  I know my 3 are so different.

Some autistic traits could include:

  • Scatter/splinter skills of abilities –
    • such as poor gross motor or fine motor skills and the ability to read at a very young age
  • Oversensitive or under sensitive to pain
  • Desire for the same daily schedule, toys, type of clothes or an insistent on “sameness”
  • Repeating words, phrases in place of typical language or conversation (This is known as echolalia)
  • Much difficulty expressing needs – they may use pointing, gestures versus words, or tantrums
  • Finding situations funny or laughing at times when it is inappropriate (i.e., laughing at a baby crying.)
  • Activity is noticeably under active or over active
  • Excessive or frequent tantrums
  • Can be aggressive or self injurious
  • Prefers to be alone – may have social skills deficits
  • Autistics can act deaf or be non responsive to verbal cues
  • Odd play such as; spinning objects, or using toys for something besides there their intended purpose or using an odd attraction to an item that is inappropriate for age
  • Non existent or poor eye contact
  • Non responsive to typical teaching methods
  • May respond negatively to crowds or not able to mix well with others
  • Difficulty with holding a conversation
  • May not like hugs, or to be cuddled.
  • Sensitivity to loud noises, tags in clothes, coarse clothing, lights, and smells
  • Frequently uses peripheral vision to track items (e.g., rolling car along countertop at eye-level)
  • Highly self-limited diet (narrow down foods they’ll eat to a very limited few items when previously a broader range was accepted (e.g., bread, chicken nuggets, cheese, milk, and crackers – period.)
  • A high amount of severe food allergies
  • History of chronic ear infections as an infant
  • Severe gastro-intestinal issues; chronic loose and/or foul-smelling stools.
  • Lack of imaginative play or imitation.
by on Dec. 8, 2011 at 10:46 AM
Replies (41-50):
christinie13
by on Apr. 23, 2012 at 1:12 PM

my son has come along way after many, many visits to a Light of LIfe practitioner's office. he used to bob his head up and down a lot, and make weird hand gestures. now he is able to make eye contact more often and isn't as antisocial like he used to be. i highly recommend this particular treatment for everyone, whether your child has autism or not. this particular treatment works on a very deep, cellular level. there is nothing else like this anywhere. if you are interested, you can google light of life with regina bernstein. i don't know what i would have done without it.

Austinsmom4544
by Silver Member on Apr. 23, 2012 at 1:32 PM

I would have answered yes to all but about 4 of these!  Thanks for posting this I can see where he has overcome a majority of these and how much progress he has made since we had my son diagnosed at 3.  Very enlightening :)


Miracleatlast
by on Apr. 24, 2012 at 11:11 AM

Hi,

I am new here, so there is a lot that I do not know. My son Jason is 3 years 2 months old, has a speech delay, and at his IEP last week I was told that he was very likely to be autistic. They already put him in a special preschool class for kids with autism. I really don't know what to think! They gave the same test/ qustionaire to me and to his preschool teacher / normal christian preschool/ to fill, and scored him based on that. The problem is that what I see at home and what his teacher sees at preschool are two very different things. I have worked as a preschool teacher before, for 7 years so I have a lot of experience with other kids. My son is stubborn at times and does act out and throw tantrums especially when hungry or tired.Yet, I do not want to live in denial.  What do you think.

  • Scatter/splinter skills of abilities –
    • such as poor gross motor or fine motor skills and the ability to read at a very young
    • age no he has very good motor skills. occasionally walks on toes - not often very good fine motor skills
  • Oversensitive or under sensitive to pain no
  • Desire for the same daily schedule, toys, type of clothes or an insistent on “sameness” no
  • Repeating words, phrases in place of typical language or conversation (This is known as echolalia) sometimes I wander if that is because he is excited about learning the new words. he does not repeat words out of place though
  • Much difficulty expressing needs – they may use pointing, gestures versus words, or tantrums Jason does have speech delay, so sometimes uses pointing, sometimes says the word, yet other imes he simply brings you the object, for example the milk jug and his cup and says " Milk please", "help", etc.
  • Finding situations funny or laughing at times when it is inappropriate (i.e., laughing at a baby crying.) no
  • Activity is noticeably under active or over active no
  • Excessive or frequent tantrums yes
  • Can be aggressive or self injurious no
  • Prefers to be alone – may have social skills deficits very outgoing, loves to play with other kids, but lacks the language skills to connect
  • Autistics can act deaf or be non responsive to verbal cues no
  • Odd play such as; spinning objects, or using toys for something besides there their intended purpose or using an odd attraction to an item that is inappropriate for age no
  • Non existent or poor eye contact no
  • Non responsive to typical teaching methods sometimes
  • May respond negatively to crowds or not able to mix well with others maybe
  • Difficulty with holding a conversation not sure
  • May not like hugs, or to be cuddled. initiates hugs, gives kisses. very affectionate with his 1 yo sister
  • Sensitivity to loud noises, tags in clothes, coarse clothing, lights, and smells no
  • Frequently uses peripheral vision to track items (e.g., rolling car along countertop at eye-level) no
  • Highly self-limited diet (narrow down foods they’ll eat to a very limited few items when previously a broader range was accepted (e.g., bread, chicken nuggets, cheese, milk, and crackers – period.) Picky eater, but will try new things.Eats the above foods, but also oranges, tuna, apples, raisins, all kinds of cookies, grapes
  • A high amount of severe food allergies none
  • History of chronic ear infections as an infant no
  • Severe gastro-intestinal issues; chronic loose and/or foul-smelling stools. no
  • Lack of imaginative play or imitation. no
  • He does spin in circkles when dancing - loves dancing whenever he hears music with a nice beat to it. Acts very happy. When angry throws toys / pencils. Loves drawing, knows his shapes /letters, can count well up to 10 maybe a little more. Very good with puzzles, "hidden object" computer games, remote controls, cd and dvd players, tv, etc.
AspieCarrie
by on Apr. 24, 2012 at 11:48 AM

Yes to ALL of them for me AND Maxwell *except* the high amount of food allergies.

I don't understand the imaginative play. I never have.

Rachel has a lot of those signs, but not all. 

jnttd
by on Apr. 24, 2012 at 12:02 PM
I had no idea the poop could be a symptom.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
AspieCarrie
by on Apr. 24, 2012 at 12:50 PM

Yup. It's pretty common.

My mom recently told me I smeared poop and she freaked out on me so horrifically, she thinks that's why I never did it again. 

Max did it, too, but only a couple of times. I didn't freak out on him, but I know I got off very lucky on that because it's so very common in ASC kids. 

Quoting jnttd:

I had no idea the poop could be a symptom.


~ Carrie :)
Mom with Aspergers Syndrome parenting children on and off the spectrum

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jkb_unlike
by on Apr. 26, 2012 at 12:42 AM

 

  • Scatter/splinter skills of abilities –
    • such as poor gross motor or fine motor skills and the ability to read at a very young age NOT THAT I KNOW
  • Oversensitive or under sensitive to pain   YES (UNDER)
  • Desire for the same daily schedule, toys, type of clothes or an insistent on “sameness”  YES AND NO (ONLY PLAYS WITH CERTAIN TOYS)
  • Repeating words, phrases in place of typical language or conversation (This is known as echolalia)  NO
  • Much difficulty expressing needs – they may use pointing, gestures versus words, or tantrums  YES
  • Finding situations funny or laughing at times when it is inappropriate (i.e., laughing at a baby crying.)  CANT ANWSER DUE TO AGE (HES NOT QUITE 2)
  • Activity is noticeably under active or over active  YES (OVER)
  • Excessive or frequent tantrums  YES
  • Can be aggressive or self injurious  YES
  • Prefers to be alone – may have social skills deficits   YES
  • Autistics can act deaf or be non responsive to verbal cues  NO
  • Odd play such as; spinning objects, or using toys for something besides there their intended purpose or using an odd attraction to an item that is inappropriate for age   YES
  • Non existent or poor eye contact   POSSIBLY HE DOES HAVE EYE CONTACT UNLESS YOU ARE HOLDING HIM OR TALKING TO HIMDIRECTLY
  • Non responsive to typical teaching methods   YES
  • May respond negatively to crowds or not able to mix well with others   MABEY (AT EASTER INSTEAD OF PLAYING WITH THE OTHER CHILDREN HE HID AND PLAYED QUIETLY BY HIMSELF IN THE BEDROOM)
  • Difficulty with holding a conversation  N/A AT HIS AGE
  • May not like hugs, or to be cuddled.   YES YES YES
  • Sensitivity to loud noises, tags in clothes, coarse clothing, lights, and smells    YES LIGHTS
  • Frequently uses peripheral vision to track items (e.g., rolling car along countertop at eye-level)  YES THIS CAUGHT ME OFF GAURD BECAUSE HE DOES THIS ALL THE TIME WITH HIS TRUCK ON THE COUNTER
  • Highly self-limited diet (narrow down foods they’ll eat to a very limited few items when previously a broader range was accepted (e.g., bread, chicken nuggets, cheese, milk, and crackers – period.) YES 1000 TIMES OVER
  • A high amount of severe food allergies   NO
  • History of chronic ear infections as an infant  YES
  • Severe gastro-intestinal issues; chronic loose and/or foul-smelling stools.  NO
  • Lack of imaginative play or imitation.  YES

MY SON HAS NEVER BEEN DIAGNOSED YET. IM TRYING TO SET UP AN EVALUATION OF HIM BY FIRST STEPS HOPING FOR THIS WEEK OR THE BEGINING OF NEXT WEEK. FEEL FREE TO TELL ME WHAT YOU THINK!

thatgirl70
by on Apr. 26, 2012 at 1:10 AM


Conor:

  • such as poor gross motor or fine motor skills
  • Much difficulty expressing needs – they may use pointing, gestures versus words, or tantrums (before he could talk in sentences)
  • Prefers to be alone – may have social skills deficits (sometimes, but he's a little more social than he used to be)
  • Autistics can act deaf or be non responsive to verbal cues (DH is the same way sometimes, I swear, sometimes I wonder if he has autism too--and he didn't speak until he was 4 either).
  • Non existent or poor eye contact
  • Non responsive to typical teaching methods
  • May respond negatively to crowds or not able to mix well with others
  • Difficulty with holding a conversation
  • Sensitivity to loud noises (and he seems to prefer when his clothing is tight)
  • Highly self-limited diet (narrow down foods they’ll eat to a very limited few items when previously a broader range was accepted (e.g., bread, chicken nuggets, cheese, milk, and crackers – period.)
  • A high amount of severe food allergies (we did allergy skin tests on him, in the food elimination stage right now, actually hoping he's not allergic to everything that he reacted to, but even if he is, they don't appear to be severe)
  • History of chronic ear infections as an infant (not enough to be considered for tubes, but he had a few).
thatgirl70
by on Apr. 26, 2012 at 2:00 AM

Maybe I should print this out (with Conor's traits highlighted) for DH to give to his parents, plus examples of things you guys have described about your own ASD children that also mirror things that Conor does.

Probably not worth the effort though, because the will never understand.

sissyboogs
by Member on Apr. 26, 2012 at 2:05 AM
1 mom liked this

A lot of signs my son had when he was diagnosed, he has since outgrown. I need to get him re-evaluated because they told me there was a chance he'd outgrow the diagnosis, and I believe he has. 

But, when he was diagnosed, their major concerns were his lack of eye contact (out grown now) and his constant repetition of words/sounds. He still does that, but it seems to be more "normal" now when compared to his peers. I don't really know how to explain what I mean. 

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