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Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

Your ASD Child & School: Resources, Support, Information, Questions and More!

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Are you looking for information on school for your ASD child?  We've got tons!

Whether you're deciding between homeschool or public school, struggling with specific school issues, trying to find information about school services for your child, or looking for advice on when to start school, your fellow moms have been there!

Get started by joining one of these conversations:

Considering homeschooling? Read some pros and cons.

> Wondering what kind of school is right for your child? See what works for other moms.

> Need information on early intervention?  Start here!

> Looking for local resources? Click here to find help.

 

You can ask specific questions or share advice in the replies below, and you'll find many more discussions on a large variety of school issues and topics in the group

by on Dec. 16, 2011 at 9:40 AM
Replies (81-88):
aidensmomma508
by Wendy on Sep. 19, 2013 at 10:48 PM

Call the towns special Ed director and tell them how you moved and have an iep 

Quoting FinnsMomma10:



Quoting aidensmomma508:

I'm here to help answer questions. My son has been in Special needs Public school pre-k class this is his 3rd and final year, next year Kindergarten! 


Hi there,

My son was diagnosed with autism in June and my husband and I just moved to Illinois in August to be closer to family. We had an IEP set up in New Mexico where we lived and we were told it carries to any state you move to. So my question now is how do I start? Do I need to put him in an autistic preschool? will they place him in the right preschool for us? I feel like a bumbling idiot but I'm just new to all of this and feeling a bit overwhelmed. Thanks


ccherie
by on Feb. 6, 2014 at 6:28 PM
my child was in special needs school since 18 mo old til he was mainstreamed to kindergarten. special needs schools help him adjust and teach him with the tools to make him/her understand to meet their goals. its very important to 'stereotype them' as u say at this age in school. they make them feel accomplished unlike regular school where they feel like a failure and different. my son is now in 8th grade. he is highly fumctional, however, he would not be at this level if he didnt get great help from 18 mo. on. you seem to be the one stereotyping. get over it and think what his needs are. there is so much help out there compared to years ago. take advantage of it. my son still doesnt like change, anxiety, some meltdowns, struggles in school somewhat but he is learning everyday and little by little he is handling life. Its hard as hell for us parents to deal with this but we have to be our childs biggest advocate and not their enemy. fight hard every step od the way with the schools, teachers, etc. to always remind them to help with your child...been there done that and still doing that. good luck..it only gets better with help.

Quoting Penguin_ar:

Do you mind me asking if you intend to mainstream?  My son is in a small church based playschool but his ASD/ SPD is getting more pronounced and the treacher is having difficulty with him.  We are considering the local SN pre-school, but are afraid to "type cast" him so early (he turns 4 this month, so another year before kindergarten, or two if we keep him back), and not sure how much a SN pre-school would prepare him for mainstreaming or would the system then automatically try to push him into a SN school/ classroom.

ccherie
by on Feb. 6, 2014 at 6:34 PM
usually IEP lasts 3 yrs but some states may want to retest due to criteria differences. start asking questions and learn by reading. be your childs best advocate. ask, ask, ask, til u understand...then u can make an informed decision. dont be afraid and good luck.

Quoting aidensmomma508:

Call the towns special Ed director and tell them how you moved and have an iep 

Quoting FinnsMomma10:




Quoting aidensmomma508:

I'm here to help answer questions. My son has been in Special needs Public school pre-k class this is his 3rd and final year, next year Kindergarten! 



Hi there,

My son was diagnosed with autism in June and my husband and I just moved to Illinois in August to be closer to family. We had an IEP set up in New Mexico where we lived and we were told it carries to any state you move to. So my question now is how do I start? Do I need to put him in an autistic preschool? will they place him in the right preschool for us? I feel like a bumbling idiot but I'm just new to all of this and feeling a bit overwhelmed. Thanks


mamatink7
by Franceska on Feb. 16, 2014 at 3:47 PM

beesmartbaby.com dvds flashcards building expressive and receptive language skills. also try brighter learning adventures we used them for yrs and yrs while homeschooling (age 3-7)

Quoting momgriffith1:

Does anyone know any tools that may help us our sonhas been diagnopsed aspergers He's 4 real smart and sweet .....We cant find many resources or educational tools for him   



Relentless10
by New Member on Mar. 5, 2014 at 6:12 PM

My son Kyle is a high functioning autistic child, who at the age of 10 has had many issues with his behavior throughout the years. When Kyle was approximately six and starting kindergarten, we began to truly see the effects that autism presented from a social perspective. The early signs and symptoms of autism were already there so we felt we knew how to cope with an autistic child. However, his social development was a new chapter for us.


What ultimately began to surface was Kyle's inability to recognize the different facial expressions of his classmates and others around him. At first glance, we thought he would come out of the learning curve and be just fine, but this seemingly minor problem quickly escalated. His failure to correctly identify the expressions and emotions of his classmates, created a slow, progressive divide between Kyle and his friends. As the problem progressed he began to withdraw. Many times we would find him sitting by himself at lunch or at playtime, simply failing to interact with the class and his teacher.


With our concern mounting, we began reading articles about autism and social behavior. We read books on autism, autism research papers, looked at different autism treatments to help better understand what Kyle was facing, trying to understand how we could help in his quality of life. We looked at autistic camps and a variety of autism schools, believing they would have a better curriculum and better understanding of his needs and behavior.


On one particular evening, we attended an autistic support group in Scottsdale Arizona. A wonderful group who encouraged us to bring Kyle along so he could interact with their own autistic children while parents discussed their concerns, trials and tribulations along with their many successes.


With over 40 families in attendance, I was a bit overwhelmed with the multiplicity of children at all levels of the autism spectrum. This was the first time that I had been in the company of such a diverse group. Several of the kids were diagnosed with Asperger’s, all with a varying degree within that diagnosis. The remaining were challenged with autism. Some were high functioning autism kids like our son Kyle. Several were non-verbal or had repetitive behaviors like tics and stimming, then there were those dealing with social interaction, all of which I would learn so much more about in the following years with Kyle.


As the meeting was wrapping up, my wife and I began to visit with parents individually. We met a couple that in the recent past, had very similar issues to our own. They told us about a video library called Model Me kids which positively changed their son’s ability to manage his social behavior around his friends at school and suggested we review their web site. The following weekend we got online and discovered that Model Me kids was a well recognized organization with a highly knowledgeable team of professionals dedicated to producing affordable quality training videos specifically for autistic and Asperger children.


Model Me kids is a series of DVD’s designed as teaching tools for children, adolescents and teenagers with Autism, Aspergers, PDD-NOS, Nonverbal Learning Disorder (NVLD or NLD), and developmental delays. These DVD’s are used by thousands of therapists, parents and teachers to help prepare kids for the social behavioral problems most autistic children face.


With Kyle’s immediate need to recognize the different expressions and emotions of his current classmates, we were pleased to discover that Model Me kids had a DVD set specifically designed for his current issue appropriately called, Model Me Faces and Emotions™ - so we purchased a copy. (Ultimately, we purchased the 2 box sets)


Model Me Faces and Emotions™ is an inexpensive video designed for ages 2-8 and introduces a variety of faces and emotions, featuring children 2-8 in age. Every emotion is demonstrated in a variety of situations. Model Me Faces and Emotions™ is helpful for children with Asperger Syndrome and Autism because it helps promote a simplification of a variety of emotions kids and adults have.


Its difficult to express the difference this one DVD set made in helping Kyle understand his friends and family. He enjoyed watching the videos and asked to watch them even over some of his favorite cartoons and shows. Barney and TelaTubbies were quite frankly driving my wife and I nuts.


Anyway, as I mentioned, Model Me Faces and Emotions™ is designed for 2-8 year old and really it’s just the tip of the iceberg in an incredible series of DVD’s designed to help kids who struggle with social insufficiencies, all the way up to 9-17 in age. Like our friends child, these early development DVD’s made a significant impact on how our child learned to interact with his friends and family members.


Through the last few years, as Kyle continued to experience new challenges with social behavior, Model Me Kids was there for us with a whole library of key videos, which address specific challenges that most autistic and Asperger children face today. 

These DVD’s were instrumental in Kyle’s incredible development and saved us thousands in therapy and frustration. Today Kyle is in the public school system. As of last week April 2011, Kyle made the A’s honor roll. He’s playing sports, has sleep-over’s and hangs out with friends both at home and online with Playstation 3. We could not have done this without Model Me Kids. PERIOD!


Both my wife and I encourage any parent or teaching staff struggling with these issues to visit Model Me Kids and watch the demos available for each DVD set. These videos are a tremendous help to any child challenged with autism or Asperger Syndrome.


Below is a list of other DVD’s and teaching manuals/ student workbooks from Model Me Kids.


2 box sets are also available to help save money since you most likely will want them all anyway.

Set 1 contains the entire series for children 2-12

Set 2 contains the entire series for children 9-17


 

Children 2-8


Children 5-12

I Can Do It! ™  (* Highly recommended)

Time for School™ (* Highly recommended)


Children 9-17

Model Me Conversation Cues® (* Highly recommended)


Manuals

proudmomofalana
by New Member on Mar. 26, 2014 at 9:18 AM
My daughter was diagnosed yesterday with autism.she understands very little language and has very little language.what advice cab you give me on ways to communicate
LCSWBecca
by New Member on May. 5, 2014 at 4:08 PM

Hi,  I am a mom-in-waiting as I am adopting, but I'm also the sister of a woman with autism. I'm attempting to complete my PhD by doing my dissertation on how parents of children with autism feel about the IEP process.  If anyone is interested in participating, the link to the survey is www.surveymonkey.com/s/WKBWPYR

My PhD is in Educational leadership and my Masters is in Social Work, so if I can answer any questions about therapy, education, or being the sibling of a child with autism, let me know!

moni23
by New Member on Jun. 4, 2014 at 7:39 PM
Does he have a theripist you have to keep asking them to test him and tell him that something is going on with him because no matter what a mom knows when there's something going on with there children

Quoting cindydharrell:

My son, Logan is 4 1/2 years old.   We were denied services when he was
2. They said he had great eye contact, so he did not have autism.  I
feel it's definitely Asperger's.  All the classic text book symptoms,
from  what I have read.  We are in the process of referral to Far
Northern Regional in Chico, CA.  We had the public school system here do
some evals and he does not qualifiy for an IEP because he tested too
high.  Of course his motor skills and social skills were all 0, but the
rest were very high.  The public school is rushing us for a diagnosis;
which is NOT going to happen.  The Far Northern Regional Center wants me
to insist that the public school system start OT immediately.  We are
in a catch 22...  I am 100% willing to do ALL I can to help my son!!! 
ANY SUGGESTIONS????

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