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I need advise please!!!!

Posted by on Feb. 8, 2012 at 5:10 PM
  • 12 Replies

My son is going to be 4 in March and we believe he has PDD.  The Doctor has not confirmed it yet because they are still running test on him.

I can not get him to eat, he has been eliminating foods for about 2.5 yrs now.  He is currently down to sour cream and onion pringles, bananas, milk, fries and crackers.   I can not get him to eat anything else and it is driving us crazy.  He looks thinner than ever.   I am lost and don't know what to do or how to get him to eat anything.  It is a huge struggle, I know everyone tells me to sit him at the table and introduce 1 new food at a time but it hasn't done anything.  I would appreciate any advise.



by on Feb. 8, 2012 at 5:10 PM
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Replies (1-10):
tinatyty2011
by on Feb. 8, 2012 at 5:36 PM
How about lining up a few new foods in front of him when he's hungry and see which one he'll go for. Make sure his fave foods are out of sight. Try some things like apples slices, chicken tenders, and some colorful red jello. Don't ask him what he wants, show him his choices. Just a suggestion but hope it helps. GL!
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fawnie
by on Feb. 8, 2012 at 6:15 PM

Wow, sounds alot like my 6 year old, Eddie. There are things he used to eat but for some reason, doesn't anymore. Eddie's favorites now are Doritos, apples, milk, fries, chicken (nugget form and baked), and cereal. I like to make sure he gets a multi-vitamin every morning though. Oh, he likes V-8 juice with the fruit flavors. (Strawberry Banana V-8 is a big hit.) I figure it's a serving of fruits and vegetables. I've thought about buying Pediasure. That should help with some of the missing nutrients. I've also heard of powered nutrients you can add to milk for kids. Not sure where it'd be in the store, perhaps the vitamin isle.

I hope I gave you some ideas until you see the doctor again. Vitamins, V-8 juice, and Pedisure are places to start if you haven't already. Keep showing him new foods too. Good luck!

mustbeGRACE
by on Feb. 8, 2012 at 6:32 PM

Contact your closest Children's Hospital usually found in the bigger cities.

Ask for children's behavioral department and ask someone there for the feeding clinic.

mallowcup17
by on Feb. 8, 2012 at 7:34 PM
As far as his nutrition have you tried those supplement drinks for kids? Also does he see a therapist of any kind that could help with some of this behavior? Good luck and I hope you are able to find some answers soon
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dawncs
by Dawn on Feb. 8, 2012 at 7:37 PM

Have you tried Ensure shakes? They come in the form of cans. There are several different flavors of it including vanilla, chocolate, and strawberry.

Dawn
Beautifully Talanted Autistic Social Story Author
Diagnosed Asperger Syndrome as an adult
Diagnosed Edema (since young)
Author Page: http://www.toyboxunlimited.com/ (has discounts)

Leobaby2007
by on Feb. 8, 2012 at 7:48 PM
I have been thinking the same thing- a feeding specialist. When my son was an infant, he was a great eater. Since age 3 (he is 4.5 now), it's gotten worse and worse. All day long he drinks chocolate milk and will eat chicken nuggets from McD or BK. He weighs 37.5 pounds, and that is OK, but he looks so thin to me and the way he eats cannot possibly be good for him.

Does anyone know why so many kids with autism are such picky eaters- besides sensory issues, which is not a problem for us? He used to eat smooth creamy things like yogurt as well as crunchy things too. But now- a small variety of foods only. It drives me NUTS. INSANE. BONKERS.
ROGUEM
by on Feb. 8, 2012 at 9:37 PM

 The feeding therapist I talked to said that a majority of ASD kids like to eat bland colored (tan and brown) foods that is uniform in texture and taste.  The most common foods for ASD kids are nuggets, fries, cereal, crackers, cookies, yogurt, and pureed foods.  What do these have in common??? Well, they are bland colored, every bite tastes the same, and the texture is the same.  So once again our kids like and are comforted by routine even in their food choices.  The therapist said to try to work within these boundaries first.  Don't eliminate what they will eat but add more choices similar to the foods they will eat. 

I am trying this right now and I am slowly (very slowly) being able to add new foods.

Hope this helps.

steph2884
by on Feb. 8, 2012 at 11:39 PM
Seek out a speech therapist trained in feeding problems. My son can only eat puréed foods, so we have a speech therapist trained in a few different methods of feeding therapy. Right now, she is doing a combination of ABA and SOS.
hwifeandmom
by on Feb. 9, 2012 at 7:35 AM

With my kids, I built on the foods they'd already eat.  For my daughter, initially she'd primarily eat pasta (no sauces).  So, we worked on eating different shapes of pasta.  Then we worked on adding cheese sauce (she couldn't tolerate tomato-based products like spaghetti sauce).  Once she liked cheese sauce, we were able to get her to eat cheese sandwiches.

Similarly, once she was eating pancakes with syrup, then we had her try french toast with syrup, then scrambled eggs with syrup, then eggs with cheese.  These were not quick transitions, but very long and gradual.  

Since your son eats french fries, you can try serving homemade fries in different shapes (my son likes silver dollar fries), then maybe work up to fries dipped in various flavors (catsup, melted cheese, vegetable dip, milkshakes, etc).  Eventually you may be able to get him to eat a baked potato or mashed potatoes.  You can also try putting different flavors in his milk (chocolate milk, strawberry milk, vanilla milk, fruit smoothie blended in milk, etc).  How about bananas dipped in chocolate or bananas dipped in peanut butter?

We discovered that peer pressure would occasionally inspire my kids to try a new food.  My daughter hated goldfish crackers until she went to nursery at church.  Since all the other kids were eating goldfish during snack time, she decided to try them, too.

I also learned to think beyond the traditional foods.  My kids didn't like apples and bananas, but they would eat mangos and canned mandarin oranges. 

My daughter has nearly grown out of her food issues.  She really began to make significant progress in her early teens.  She still has some aversions but is generally willing to at least try new things.  My son made progress in his eating until he was around 10yrs old, but then he began to regress as his stress increased (school related stresses).  I have not fought him as hard with his food issues since he has enough other stressors, but I do make him at least taste everything we're eating before he has his own foods.  He hasn't really learned to LIKE any new foods, but at least he is learning to be calmer about trying/ experiencing new foods.


Giozmommy
by on Feb. 9, 2012 at 12:32 PM

OMG is so true the list of food you wrote on this post is what my son only eats!!  It makes sense to me now....every bite tastes the same to him

Quoting ROGUEM:

 The feeding therapist I talked to said that a majority of ASD kids like to eat bland colored (tan and brown) foods that is uniform in texture and taste.  The most common foods for ASD kids are nuggets, fries, cereal, crackers, cookies, yogurt, and pureed foods.  What do these have in common??? Well, they are bland colored, every bite tastes the same, and the texture is the same.  So once again our kids like and are comforted by routine even in their food choices.  The therapist said to try to work within these boundaries first.  Don't eliminate what they will eat but add more choices similar to the foods they will eat. 

I am trying this right now and I am slowly (very slowly) being able to add new foods.

Hope this helps.


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