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Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

The IPAD is not the solution to all your problems

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Personally, I get tired of people telling me to get my son an IPAD.  First off, we can't afford it.  Secondly, even if we could, I probably wouldn't get one.  In my local autism support group, several of the parents got their kids IPADs and other tablets, and the result--- the kids seem to be even less likely to interact than they were before.  They just sit in the corner and play games or whatever.  Don't see how this really helps.  

by on Apr. 12, 2012 at 3:33 PM
Replies (31-40):
marisab
by Gold Member on Apr. 12, 2012 at 9:34 PM

my thinking its how how u us ethe ipad with them if its a benefit or not

kajira
by Emma on Apr. 12, 2012 at 9:35 PM

haha well darn, okay, well you can message me on cafemom and we can chat about stuff, I have stuff i'd like to say, but don't even know where to start, and you certainly *are not* alone.


Quoting rosemagic01:

I do not have yim. 

Quoting kajira:

do you have yahoo messenger? I'm more than willing to talk to you about some of this stuff, but I do it best back and forth in IM's. I get distracted too easily trying to write long emails. LOL


if you do : jakeskajira@yahoo.com is my IM :)

Quoting rosemagic01:

OMG do I want to hug you right now. I've always felt that there was this big massive thing wrong with me when me and my son melt down together because we both get so frustrated. To know another person has felt that...seriously I thought honestly that I was just a shitty parent this makes me feel like maybe I'm not alone and maybe its not my parenting but that I could be wired like my son. I don't know why I've never thought of it this way. We both feed off each other some times. I have anxiety and we're pretty certain I have SPD like my son. We both tend to get so over whelmed some times my husband doesn't even know what to do with us. 

Quoting kajira:

not if you as a parent can't handle sitting at a table playing the game because you have the same wiring as your kid.

my son and I played a table top last night and we BOTH had a melt down over it.

I'm getting diablo3 for us to play together when it comes out next month.

Quoting badgermom2012:

I'm not bashing you at all.  But I would like to point out that you can do turn taking with actual games where the two of you are sitting at a table.  That's what me and my son do.  

Quoting LIMom1105:

My son loves apps, loves video games too. His first was Angry Birds. There actually are things I love about that silly game. It helped us teach turn taking, we would play with him and he would have a turn, then we would. I really think this helped him learn that concept. Even with a simple game like that, there is some problem solving. And it was wildly popular when he started playing it, and he would actually go up to other kids who also play and talk about it.

I started out very against these games for him, but I do like the, better than TV at this point, not as passive. Yes, your child probably will get hooked, but if you set limits early on and stick to them, it's manageable.

And I LOVE this for dr. Appts.







Blog writer/author : Outside the box thinking The Quirky Kitty 



thatgirl70
by on Apr. 12, 2012 at 10:04 PM
1 mom liked this

DH and I have been waiting for Diable 3 too. :)

Quoting kajira:

not if you as a parent can't handle sitting at a table playing the game because you have the same wiring as your kid.

my son and I played a table top last night and we BOTH had a melt down over it.

I'm getting diablo3 for us to play together when it comes out next month.

Quoting badgermom2012:

I'm not bashing you at all.  But I would like to point out that you can do turn taking with actual games where the two of you are sitting at a table.  That's what me and my son do.  

Quoting LIMom1105:

My son loves apps, loves video games too. His first was Angry Birds. There actually are things I love about that silly game. It helped us teach turn taking, we would play with him and he would have a turn, then we would. I really think this helped him learn that concept. Even with a simple game like that, there is some problem solving. And it was wildly popular when he started playing it, and he would actually go up to other kids who also play and talk about it.

I started out very against these games for him, but I do like the, better than TV at this point, not as passive. Yes, your child probably will get hooked, but if you set limits early on and stick to them, it's manageable.

And I LOVE this for dr. Appts.




steph2884
by on Apr. 12, 2012 at 10:04 PM
It's the same thing as anything else. Use in moderation! If you let a typical kid play the Xbox without setting limits, they will be less likely to interact with people. Our autistic children aren't any different. My son has improved on letter and number recognition due to our iPad. And the only reason why we have an iPad is because my husband's grandma gave it to us for our son. It's not like we have an extra $600 laying around either. It is not needed for every single child, but it can be used as an educational tool if you aren't a lazy parent that just hands your kid an iPad and go sit at your computer and zone out on Facebook. It is also used for my son's feeding therapy. It motivates him to eat different puréed foods. So for us, it is a great tool, so don't knock the rest of us for using it as such.
Sheriff6
by on Apr. 12, 2012 at 10:46 PM
I totally agree! I think for an older child that cannot communicate or as a last resort for help, but how can a human compete with technology? I want to be the funniest thing in my grandsons world so he will want me. So far it is working, but turn the t.v. On and see how much of their attention you get!
pixieangel
by on Apr. 13, 2012 at 8:20 AM

Ok.  Number 1, you don't have to pay for it.  If you have the iPad in your son's IEP, and your doctor prescribes it, you can call and speak to the medical director for your child's insurance company and explain that it is a medical necessity if he is using PECS to communicate.  Let them know that in the long run, it's far cheaper to pay for that iPad and app than to pay for the supplies to make the PECS books.  Number 2, if you judge by what other parents do (or don't do), you may miss out on something that works for your child.  Remember, moderation is key.  If your child is using it to communicate, fine.  If your child is playing a game on it, okay.  But if it gets to a point to where that's all they do, take it from them and put it by you.  Yes, your child may have a meltdown; but if you stick w/ it, they know they will have to come to you when something is wrong anyway (or if they need something or w/e), so they will still get to use it.  As a reward, let them play a game and sit w/ them and watch.  

pixieangel
by on Apr. 13, 2012 at 8:22 AM

You guys play too?  Nice.

Quoting thatgirl70:

DH and I have been waiting for Diable 3 too. :)

Quoting kajira:

not if you as a parent can't handle sitting at a table playing the game because you have the same wiring as your kid.

my son and I played a table top last night and we BOTH had a melt down over it.

I'm getting diablo3 for us to play together when it comes out next month.

Quoting badgermom2012:

I'm not bashing you at all.  But I would like to point out that you can do turn taking with actual games where the two of you are sitting at a table.  That's what me and my son do.  

Quoting LIMom1105:

My son loves apps, loves video games too. His first was Angry Birds. There actually are things I love about that silly game. It helped us teach turn taking, we would play with him and he would have a turn, then we would. I really think this helped him learn that concept. Even with a simple game like that, there is some problem solving. And it was wildly popular when he started playing it, and he would actually go up to other kids who also play and talk about it.

I started out very against these games for him, but I do like the, better than TV at this point, not as passive. Yes, your child probably will get hooked, but if you set limits early on and stick to them, it's manageable.

And I LOVE this for dr. Appts.





crossnlilly
by Member on Apr. 13, 2012 at 8:32 AM
It can help if you use it as a learning tool. But i agree it does not solve everything. And u r right theyr super expensive. My daughter got one cuz everyone in my family pitched in to get her one cuz i couldnt afford one. But like anything else it only helps when used properly
newmommy430
by Silver Member on Apr. 13, 2012 at 9:46 AM
Thank-you. I never thought to have my doctor prescribe the ipad.


Quoting pixieangel:

Ok.  Number 1, you don't have to pay for it.  If you have the iPad in your son's IEP, and your doctor prescribes it, you can call and speak to the medical director for your child's insurance company and explain that it is a medical necessity if he is using PECS to communicate.  Let them know that in the long run, it's far cheaper to pay for that iPad and app than to pay for the supplies to make the PECS books.  Number 2, if you judge by what other parents do (or don't do), you may miss out on something that works for your child.  Remember, moderation is key.  If your child is using it to communicate, fine.  If your child is playing a game on it, okay.  But if it gets to a point to where that's all they do, take it from them and put it by you.  Yes, your child may have a meltdown; but if you stick w/ it, they know they will have to come to you when something is wrong anyway (or if they need something or w/e), so they will still get to use it.  As a reward, let them play a game and sit w/ them and watch.  


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jordiesmom05
by on Apr. 13, 2012 at 10:04 AM
My son's speech teacher lets him play on the ipad at school as a reward. I am saving up to buy him one and also will use it as a reward for good behavior. I agree with the other moms that say use it in modiration. My ds does not spend much time playing with electronics anyway. It is mostly in the car or at restaurants. At home he loves to play outside.
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