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Full Inclusion in a regular classroom

Posted by on Apr. 19, 2012 at 6:02 PM
  • 12 Replies

Hi, 

Its been a while since I've posted here - but currently right now in my province they are debating the issue of inclusion in regular classrooms of children with special needs. There are some that are fighting for basically the abolition of a special needs class and would have all special needs students inside a regular classroom at all times. 

So I'm reading up on the whole "inclusion debate" and I find this: "Full inclusionists tend to be deeply committed to defending “human rights” but rather inclined to dismiss  research and evidence contradicting their perceptions.  The Learning Disabilities Association of Canada (LDAC) and one of its founders Yude M. Henteleff continue to claim that the “fully inclusive classroom” is “only one of the right ways to meet the best interest of the special needs child.”"

(I found it from a blog here, which links several studies and information on what several groups appear to be fighting for in our province) http://educhatter.wordpress.com/2012/04/07/full-inclusion-in-public-schools-is-it-best-for-all-special-needs-kids/

My question is... if a child has trouble learning in a busy classroom due to sensitivity or behavioural issues... how is making them be in that classroom in the best interest of the child? 

I was curious to see what everyone's thoughts were on this issue. 

Thanks!

by on Apr. 19, 2012 at 6:02 PM
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Replies (1-10):
newmommy430
by Silver Member on Apr. 19, 2012 at 7:00 PM
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I believe every child is different and there are no one size fits all methods. If I child can't learn in an inclusive environment then how would that be helping the child. The social skills can be learned seperately.
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Screaminge
by on Apr. 19, 2012 at 7:07 PM
We moved just so we would have more of a choice for inclusion. The least restrictive setting - pulls outs are offered for times she can not work in classroom. And a para to help her stay on task ( some tasks may need to be modified) For us it's what we think works best for our girls.
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McMomma3
by on Apr. 19, 2012 at 7:10 PM
This is what they do for my son and it is not going well. His report card was awful, thank goodness he can only be held back once and we did it in kindergarten or he would fail this year.


Quoting Screaminge:

We moved just so we would have more of a choice for inclusion. The least restrictive setting - pulls outs are offered for times she can not work in classroom. And a para to help her stay on task ( some tasks may need to be modified) For us it's what we think works best for our girls.

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kickinit
by on Apr. 19, 2012 at 7:34 PM

RJ up until this year was fully included in the classroom with a para.  Due to behaviors (very bad ones) he's now in a private room with a para and joins the classroom for music, pe,lunch, recess, and any special event.  This seems to be working great for him right now.  We are hoping to reintroduce him into a classroom again...but are taking baby steps.  He is quite delayed compared to his 1st grade class, so not sure how he would react to doing different things then his class was.  Right now for RJ, having his own learning room is what's best for him.  Every child is so different.  Some can maintain in classrooms with mods and some cannot.  The goal would be what's best for the child and how he/she will learn more effectively.  God bless

momtoscott
by on Apr. 19, 2012 at 8:22 PM
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 I don't think full inclusion for all SN kids is in anyone's best interest, except maybe whoever is trying to cut costs in a school system.       

3mx2mom
by on Apr. 19, 2012 at 8:48 PM
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Here has been my experience. Everyone is a fan of inclusion until their child fails. Then all of a sudden, they are no longer a fan of inclusion. My son is fully included right now, but it is working for him. As he gets older, I think he will need more support.

smarieljlee
by Sara on Apr. 19, 2012 at 10:46 PM

hmmm

I have thought a bit about this. My dd recieves special ed. time, but is in full inclusion otherwise. I am fine with it since she recieves the social skills that she needs. I had to move her to a different class so she could have the best of both. I am happy I did. As long as all of her needs are being met, I am happy. I do see how it can be a not so great thing though. I think there should be the option.

smarieljlee
by Sara on Apr. 19, 2012 at 10:50 PM

Yeah. I sat through a P/T conference last fall  where the teacher was lamely flippant  about Bellas lack of progress and I realized I had enough. She needed more individualized care.

Quoting 3mx2mom:

Here has been my experience. Everyone is a fan of inclusion until their child fails. Then all of a sudden, they are no longer a fan of inclusion. My son is fully included right now, but it is working for him. As he gets older, I think he will need more support.


marisab
by on Apr. 20, 2012 at 12:34 AM

my son has partial inclusion gettoing pulled out for therapys and when beghaviors are 2 much ..i think this decision must best be determined per child cause all kids are different!!

odie_driver
by on Apr. 20, 2012 at 8:02 AM

Thanks everyone for your replies! They really help me understand that I'm not crazy in thinking a full/forced inclusion model is probably  not a great idea and I agree that its very likely a dollars and cents issue behind the curtain. 

I'm not against inclusion, I'm against forcing students to participate in a classroom that they're not equipped to handle - at their detriment and the disruption of the rest of the class. If a child can handle being in the classroom, a lot, a little, all the time or not at all - it should be at the individual needs and capabilities of the child and not a mandate of the government to force them to endure a classroom that they are ill equipped to cope with.  

My daughter Winnie is pretty much 95% included in the classroom - she is removed for a small portion of each day for some one-on-one learning, that she benefits from greatly. She loves her classmates and enjoys being in the classroom setting. But at the same time, she also has the ability to leave the classroom with her EA if she is overwhelmed or stressed. I would simply hate for these options to be removed from the system because of an extreme total inclusion model. What happens to the kids who can't handle as much as Winnie can?

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