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Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

Need some suggestions..

Posted by on May. 2, 2012 at 6:45 PM
  • 7 Replies

 Today I went to the school to meet with Andrew's teachers. They showed me that he has made some good forward steps. That being said she is worried about his growth in social settings. He has a hard time enjecting himself into a topic the class is talking about, he has problems with his self estem, and building up self confindince.  I dont know how to help him in this area..so i was wondering if there was any books I can read to help him or any games I can work on him with..I am pretty clueless on this..

 

by on May. 2, 2012 at 6:45 PM
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Replies (1-7):
MilissaCarden
by on May. 2, 2012 at 7:19 PM
I don't knownof any sorry. Here's a bump
kajira
by Emma on May. 2, 2012 at 7:28 PM
Get the book "Of mice and Aliens : An Aspergers adventure" It's written by a teacher from australia - she has a whole story line for kids with autism - I bought it for my son and he read it in an hour and has re-read it about 5 times and just loves it. I still can't get him to tell me what's in the book or why he likes it.... but it's clear he gets something out of it that makes him really happy. LOL
lovebeingmrs
by on May. 2, 2012 at 7:30 PM

 

Quoting kajira:

Get the book "Of mice and Aliens : An Aspergers adventure" It's written by a teacher from australia - she has a whole story line for kids with autism - I bought it for my son and he read it in an hour and has re-read it about 5 times and just loves it. I still can't get him to tell me what's in the book or why he likes it.... but it's clear he gets something out of it that makes him really happy. LOL

 I will look into that...thank you

kajira
by Emma on May. 2, 2012 at 7:36 PM

I know it's not easy - my son really seemed to be struggling last year - we moved to a small town, and started being extremely hands on and a little more over protective and structured and talking to him on a regular basis, while slowly pushing boundaries... and we've seen huge improvements in him. in both temperment, and behavior.

A small town - also people are super tolerating and patient with him too which helps his self esteem when we go out. It's not like a big city where people yell at you to make your kid sit still - the waitress has seen us 10 times and knows our son's a little different and that we work hard with him and let him practice and come in when it's not busy and... it makes a difference.

How people interact with our son, talk about him, talk to him... he's very hands on about stuff, we've been very open about his differences, and how they will benefit him and also how much hard work he'll have to do to work around some of them.

like his social skills - he has no concept of boundaries, thinks everyon'e shis friend and if someone does something mean, he can't figure out what he did wrong - here, people will talk to him differently, they won't let people bully him, and it's a small enough town that if someone picks on him for being different while he's learning, EVERYONE will know who the "asshole" is and shun them instead of someone like my son.

that really changes the self-esteem issue when they aren't treated like a monster or a bad kid.

Quoting lovebeingmrs:

 

Quoting kajira:

Get the book "Of mice and Aliens : An Aspergers adventure" It's written by a teacher from australia - she has a whole story line for kids with autism - I bought it for my son and he read it in an hour and has re-read it about 5 times and just loves it. I still can't get him to tell me what's in the book or why he likes it.... but it's clear he gets something out of it that makes him really happy. LOL

 I will look into that...thank you


steph2884
by on May. 3, 2012 at 1:35 AM

BUMP!

ermasdaughter
by on May. 3, 2012 at 9:58 AM

Self confidence and general social situations are classic issues for our children and educators can do a lot to help them bridge the gap if they are correctly trained.  When my son started school we gave the school a booklet outlining strategies for dealing with a child with aspergers .  Maybe you could help the teacher with some of her fears by arming her with information that may help her help your son?  That's what we did with out son.  We worked with the teacher to make sure she had concrete strategies to deal with our son in her class. Here is a link that contains some incredibly detailed information that may be helpful:  http://www.researchautism.org/resources/reading/index.asp

In the end, teachers in main-stream schools ofter need help understanding how to best hand the social challenges of our children in their classrooms.  

kajira
by Emma on May. 3, 2012 at 11:03 AM

this is certainly true as well - my son's teacher this year treated him horribly with out meaning too because we couldn't tell her he was autistic because he hadn't been diagnosed yet - he's still not officially diagnosed, but we got the first set of papers back from the autism research clinic and informed his school of the results, and threw a stink about wanting an IEP (before we knew the results even we wanted an IEP and they kept telling us no.)

but once we informed the school - his teacher.... what would have got him written up at school, sent to the principals office, and a phone call home with saying how horrible he was - got him a "he did X, but he had a good day, when prompted, he apologized to the boy"

2 months ago before informing him that we were 99.99% sure he's autistic and trying to get an official diagnoses for it - he'd have damn near been suspended for that - not gotten a smiley face note home saying he had a good day for the same action. LOL

So - how they react to him at school and treat him is a HUGE key too. I completely agree with educating everyone who works with your child on a regular basis and talking about it - and making sure they know they aren't all the same and being specific about *your* child's specific quirks.

Quoting ermasdaughter:

Self confidence and general social situations are classic issues for our children and educators can do a lot to help them bridge the gap if they are correctly trained.  When my son started school we gave the school a booklet outlining strategies for dealing with a child with aspergers .  Maybe you could help the teacher with some of her fears by arming her with information that may help her help your son?  That's what we did with out son.  We worked with the teacher to make sure she had concrete strategies to deal with our son in her class. Here is a link that contains some incredibly detailed information that may be helpful:  http://www.researchautism.org/resources/reading/index.asp

In the end, teachers in main-stream schools ofter need help understanding how to best hand the social challenges of our children in their classrooms.  


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