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Could my son be mildly autistic?

Posted by on May. 6, 2012 at 8:35 PM
  • 13 Replies
My son is almost 4 and he has been showing some signs but I'm not sure. He has a very high vocabulary for his age and very smart, and there are certain things he does that make me think he may be. While watching tv and eating he makes an uhh noises about every 5 secs. Also, ever since I can remember he has always been extremely particular about the way his food is prepared if it isn't a certain way he gets extremely upset, but he isnt picky about food he will eat anything but if he sees something prepared one way it has to be prepared that way everytime. Also when he plays with his cars he always lines them up in an exact straight line. Also at night he must always have his feet rubbed the exact same way. Do these sound like signs?
by on May. 6, 2012 at 8:35 PM
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Replies (1-10):
LIMom1105
by Silver Member on May. 6, 2012 at 9:06 PM
1 mom liked this
I think you should have your child evaluated, though I am no expert, so take anything I say with a grain of salt. They could be, but they also sound like Obsessive Compulsive Disorder symptoms. Does your child have difficulty in social situations, a hard time communicating with others despite his vocabulary, and behavioral issues? difficulty with transitions? If none of these things are present, I would lean more towards an OCD. But someone should examine him and give you a professional opinion.

Good luck!
MomOfOneCoolKid
by Gold Member on May. 6, 2012 at 9:31 PM

To me, it doesn't sound like autism. But I am in the same boat as you, I think my son is mildly autistic or has some form of asd. He is going to get evaluated May 9th.

For example, my son will spin a rope and make vacuuming sounds and is OBSSESSED with electronics. I don't know what to think of his speech. Sometimes I think its behind, sometimes it seems about average. He use to speak a lot of 'gibberish' but that has mostly disappeared. Lately, he's been doing really well with his behavior. His daycare teacher tells me he follows directions, etc and he has been following directions with me too lately. But that wasn't always the case. He use to scratch and bite often. He still does, but rarely, and only with me. But he's easy to correct, if that makes any sense.

The main reason I don't think he is autistic is because he is very social. He loves other kids. He gets easily bored and when he does, the first thing he asks for is a friend. He'll say "lets go see Allan" or "lets go see Jonathan" etc. The other kids also seem to take a liking to him.

 

In either case, I found this from the Austim Speaks website:

DSM-IV (DSM-4) criteria for a diagnosis of autism

Physicians use the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) for Mental Disorders to determine whether a person has an autism spectrum disorder. The latest version of this manual is the DSM-IV. Its criteria for autism include the following:

I. A total of six (or more) items from heading (A), (B) and (C) with at least two from (A) and one each from (B) and (C):

(A) Qualitative impairment in social interaction as manifested by at least two of the following:

Marked impairments in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye-to-eye gaze, facial expression, body posture and gestures to regulate social interaction.

Failure to develop peer relationships appropriate to developmental level.

A lack of spontaneous seeking to share enjoyment, interests or achievements with other people, (e.g. a lack of showing, bringing or pointing out objects of interest to other people).

A lack of social or emotional reciprocity.

(B) Qualitative impairments in communication as manifested by at least one of the following:

Delay in or total lack of the development of spoken language (not accompanied by an attempt to compensate through alternative modes of communication such as gesture or mime).

In individuals with adequate speech, marked impairment in the ability to initiate or sustain a conversation with others.

Stereotyped and repetitive use of language or idiosyncratic language.

Lack of varied, spontaneous make-believe play or social imitative play appropriate to developmental level.

(C) Restricted repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests and activities as manifested by at least two of the following:

Encompassing preoccupation with one or more stereotyped and restricted patterns of interest that is abnormal either in intensity or focus

Apparently inflexible adherence to specific nonfunctional routines or rituals

Stereotyped and repetitive motor mannerisms (e.g. hand or finger flapping or twisting, or complex whole-body movements)

Persistent preoccupation with parts of objects

II. Delays or abnormal functioning in at least one of the following areas, with onset prior to age 3 years:

(A) Social interaction
(B) Language used in social communication
(C) Symbolic or imaginative play

 

Hope this helps

mustbeGRACE
by Member on May. 6, 2012 at 9:55 PM

If he is, sounds like it's fairly mild.

smarieljlee
by Sara on May. 6, 2012 at 10:00 PM

The only way you will know for sure is to have him evaluated. That isnt a lot to go on to be honest. My dds traits are not obvious to the untrained eye. Need for routine, and high interest topics and social delays are the big ones for her.

marisab
by on May. 6, 2012 at 10:21 PM

SOUNDS LIKE SENSORY PROCESSING DISORDER AND OCD ..MIGHT BE ASPERGERS OR PDD NOS SOR HF ASD ..AS K THE DR no insist ON AN EVAL AND WELCOMEwelcome

millot310
by on May. 7, 2012 at 12:09 AM

No one on here can give you a diagnosis or tell you if your child sounds like he has symptoms of ASD. I would look at the diagnostic criteria someone posted and if you have concerns after that, make an appt w/ your pediatrician. To be diagnosed with ANYTHING, your child needs to be seen by a professional. There are criteria to each diagnosis for a reason. This is my personal and professional advice- as a LMFT.

mustbeGRACE
by Member on May. 7, 2012 at 1:13 AM

I'd just like to submit that although I'm an occupational therapist, you guys don't have to run your answers by me for me to be okay. 

Though I'm a SAHM now,  I like to consider myself to be a  professional and  I value highly the opinions of moms who've lived /  are living within the autism "theatre".

Though I'm in the actual medical field, I'll do my best to not sound overly judgemental to other moms because with everything that we're all dealing with,  no one here needs unnecessary unpleasantness.

Thanks.


LovelyLauren55
by on May. 7, 2012 at 1:16 AM
Thank you for posting this, I'll be taking it to my sons school!

Quoting MomOfOneCoolKid:

To me, it doesn't sound like autism. But I am in the same boat as you, I think my son is mildly autistic or has some form of asd. He is going to get evaluated May 9th.



For example, my son will spin a rope and make vacuuming sounds and is OBSSESSED with electronics. I don't know what to think of his speech. Sometimes I think its behind, sometimes it seems about average. He use to speak a lot of 'gibberish' but that has mostly disappeared. Lately, he's been doing really well with his behavior. His daycare teacher tells me he follows directions, etc and he has been following directions with me too lately. But that wasn't always the case. He use to scratch and bite often. He still does, but rarely, and only with me. But he's easy to correct, if that makes any sense.


The main reason I don't think he is autistic is because he is very social. He loves other kids. He gets easily bored and when he does, the first thing he asks for is a friend. He'll say "lets go see Allan" or "lets go see Jonathan" etc. The other kids also seem to take a liking to him.


 


In either case, I found this from the Austim Speaks website:


DSM-IV (DSM-4) criteria for a diagnosis of autism


Physicians use the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) for Mental Disorders to determine whether a person has an autism spectrum disorder. The latest version of this manual is the DSM-IV. Its criteria for autism include the following:

I. A total of six (or more) items from heading (A), (B) and (C) with at least two from (A) and one each from (B) and (C):


(A) Qualitative impairment in social interaction as manifested by at least two of the following:


Marked impairments in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye-to-eye gaze, facial expression, body posture and gestures to regulate social interaction.


Failure to develop peer relationships appropriate to developmental level.


A lack of spontaneous seeking to share enjoyment, interests or achievements with other people, (e.g. a lack of showing, bringing or pointing out objects of interest to other people).


A lack of social or emotional reciprocity.


(B) Qualitative impairments in communication as manifested by at least one of the following:


Delay in or total lack of the development of spoken language (not accompanied by an attempt to compensate through alternative modes of communication such as gesture or mime).


In individuals with adequate speech, marked impairment in the ability to initiate or sustain a conversation with others.


Stereotyped and repetitive use of language or idiosyncratic language.


Lack of varied, spontaneous make-believe play or social imitative play appropriate to developmental level.


(C) Restricted repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests and activities as manifested by at least two of the following:


Encompassing preoccupation with one or more stereotyped and restricted patterns of interest that is abnormal either in intensity or focus


Apparently inflexible adherence to specific nonfunctional routines or rituals


Stereotyped and repetitive motor mannerisms (e.g. hand or finger flapping or twisting, or complex whole-body movements)


Persistent preoccupation with parts of objects


II. Delays or abnormal functioning in at least one of the following areas, with onset prior to age 3 years:


(A) Social interaction
(B) Language used in social communication
(C) Symbolic or imaginative play


 


Hope this helps

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millot310
by on May. 7, 2012 at 2:29 AM


Quoting mustbeGRACE:

I'd just like to submit that although I'm an occupational therapist, you guys don't have to run your answers by me for me to be okay. 

Though I'm a SAHM now,  I like to consider myself to be a  professional and  I value highly the opinions of moms who've lived /  are living within the autism "theatre".

Though I'm in the actual medical field, I'll do my best to not sound overly judgemental to other moms because with everything that we're all dealing with,  no one here needs unnecessary unpleasantness.

Thanks.

 


kajira
by Emma on May. 7, 2012 at 2:33 AM

sounds more like OCD - my son and I are highly OCD with other traits that leans towards autism.


If it's just "one" area - I probably wouldn't worry to much about it - if it encompasses multiple areas - then you definitely for sure need to bring it up and have it evaluated.


OCD can be controlled if caught early and worked on - OCD doens't have to be a horrible thing either. (my ocd is why I keep my house clean, but learned not to stress over little stuff and not freak out or melt down if I couldn't keep my house as clean as I wanted it.)


OCD can be, in the right situation, a useful tool as an adult, perfectionist traits area awesome - as long as they don't eat you alive and destroy you... and that's the key.

balance. lOL

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