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Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

Just curious...MRIs

Posted by on Aug. 28, 2012 at 11:34 AM
  • 22 Replies

I've known several families online and in real life that have had their children with Autism undergo MRIs.  I have always wondered for what purpose?  Does it aide in diagnosis?  Do some of the parents just ask to have their child undergo an MRI?  Does having an MRI help in any way with the Autism diagnosis?  Were they a part of a study of some kind?  My mil keeps asking us why hasn't Aidan had an MRI done, and I honestly don't even know why others have them done and if they would be beneficial to him, well, in the case of studies and research then I can see the beneficial value.

by on Aug. 28, 2012 at 11:34 AM
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Replies (1-10):
jb022210
by on Aug. 28, 2012 at 11:40 AM

MRIs are done to rule out other causes for the childs behavior, my son will be having an MRI sometime soon, his first appt with the neurologist is on the 13th

tiffyhamm
by Tiffy on Aug. 28, 2012 at 11:43 AM

 

Quoting jb022210:

MRIs are done to rule out other causes for the childs behavior, my son will be having an MRI sometime soon, his first appt with the neurologist is on the 13th

Oh, ok.  So it is really to diagnose cases of Autism?  Would one even be necessary for a child (or adult) that has already been diagnosed with Autism?  I don't know much about the brain of those with Autism but I am assuming that the MRI would show some significant changes in the way their brains operate than that of "normal" individuals?  My son has never had one and I am wondering if he should have had one or should have one. 

Thanks for responding.

Blue231
by Bronze Member on Aug. 28, 2012 at 11:44 AM
My son had to have an MRI to check him after he had seizures.
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tiffyhamm
by Tiffy on Aug. 28, 2012 at 11:49 AM

 

Quoting Blue231:

My son had to have an MRI to check him after he had seizures.

Our son didn't have an MRI to check for seizures, but instead had an EEG done.  The test showed that he did not have seizures.

jb022210
by on Aug. 28, 2012 at 12:14 PM
2 moms liked this

its not used to diagnose autism but rather rule out other causes such as brain tumors, brain abnoramlities, ect.  You can't diagnose autism from an MRI, however you can rule out certain possible causes for the behavior

Quoting tiffyhamm:

 

Quoting jb022210:

MRIs are done to rule out other causes for the childs behavior, my son will be having an MRI sometime soon, his first appt with the neurologist is on the 13th

Oh, ok.  So it is really to diagnose cases of Autism?  Would one even be necessary for a child (or adult) that has already been diagnosed with Autism?  I don't know much about the brain of those with Autism but I am assuming that the MRI would show some significant changes in the way their brains operate than that of "normal" individuals?  My son has never had one and I am wondering if he should have had one or should have one. 

Thanks for responding.


Blue231
by Bronze Member on Aug. 28, 2012 at 12:38 PM
Our son had the MRI in addition to CAT scan and EEG, because his seizure affected his face in such a way that they wanted to make sure he did not have a stroke or other medical problem. It turned out his face collapse was due to epilepsy and not another medical problem. We did not have an MRI done for his Autism, though.

Quoting tiffyhamm:

 


Quoting Blue231:

My son had to have an MRI to check him after he had seizures.

Our son didn't have an MRI to check for seizures, but instead had an EEG done.  The test showed that he did not have seizures.



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mustbeGRACE
by Member on Aug. 28, 2012 at 12:55 PM

My child has aspergers.

I'm a SAHM, occupational therapist.

We never pressed the issue of giving him an MRI.

Why look for hard signs in the brain, nervous system  ( structural)?

You can see the soft signs of anything going on in there.

Expressive language disorder, for example:

You can see the soft sign  : language  ( communication) is affected.

Hard sign  : the part of the brain dealing with language development is affected in some way  ( this is a simplistic explanation, I know).

Is someone going to go in and mechanically  "fix" that area in the brain?

No. Brain surgery is very complex and dangerous most times, even if you could fix the issue with surgery.

So why all that trouble and money and trauma to the child to look at a picture where you already know that there is probably something wrong structurally  ( or, everything could look completely normal, also)?  The soft signs are proof enough of that and that there's an issue.  We want to know how complicated the issue  is?

We'll get to see it everyday in living with these folks  (  :

The issue (s) may be mild, may be severe.

But we can't fix it with surgery, so why look at it on a picture?

And it's all like using a hammer to kill a fly.

With really bad seizures, if there was indications of a tumor or something, etc.,., that's different of course...............

My child has been seen by a number of professionals at local  Children's Hospital and at a world class teaching hospital. No one suggested an MRI and I knew an MRI's limitations in the matter.

IMHO.


jordiesmom05
by on Aug. 28, 2012 at 12:56 PM
My son had an MRI to see if there was an underlying cause for his language issues. It had nothing to do with autism.
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03071012
by Bronze Member on Aug. 28, 2012 at 1:09 PM
r has had 2 MRIs. one at 5 months after starting seizures and another just in April to check for causes as to why her left eye doesn't look up. both were normal. her dev. ped. did say something about the possibility of another one, but I will decline it because she already has had 2.
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calusari
by on Aug. 28, 2012 at 3:22 PM
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Why my 7 y/o son was diagnosed 3 1/2 years ago, the option of a MRI was given. I asked if it would help him in any way, and the doctor told me that the only purpose was to determine what may have caused his autism. I told her no thank you; it wasn't going to help him, and I won't subject him to anything intrusive that he doesn't have to go through.

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