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Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

Can low autism be outgrown?

Posted by on Sep. 10, 2012 at 11:10 AM
  • 32 Replies

My son has been Diagnosied with autism/aspergers.  It was so bad that I could not work and had to be avaiable to the school at all times because he would be violent and throw chairs, desk, rip things off the walls, and I was the only one that he would calm down for.  At home we would do the same thing when he didn't get his way.  I would spank that didn't work, and I would yell that didn't work and then a stopped resonding to him and that worked.  All of this has happened even this summer but all of a sudden my son has stopped 99% of the problems.  we are a month into school and I have only received 2 phone calls but didn't have to go down to the school.  Last year he was so out of control and could be set off with the littlest thing such as moving his desk he would not change seats, he would still go to his old desk and sit down and would refuse to move.  He didn't take change very well.  This year he is changing class room and is happy and excited about it.  I see a BIG change in him and was wondering is this something that they just snap out of one day?  I have been dealing with this for 6 years now (son is 10) and I would love to have a job again and not worry about if he is going to flip out at school.  I would love for him to be "normal"

by on Sep. 10, 2012 at 11:10 AM
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Replies (1-10):
twins0506
by Holly on Sep. 10, 2012 at 11:19 AM

everyone has different views on this, but i honestly dont think so. i think with the right therapy he can be taught not to throw chairs, scream, stay seated. but i dont think it will ever be outgrown. he will always be autistic. i'm only going by what ive read, my boys are only 3 years old so i'm not talking from experience. 

kajira
by Emma on Sep. 10, 2012 at 11:21 AM
2 moms liked this

If your child is autistic, it's a wiring thing. If your child is cured of it, or outgrows it, he wasn't autistic.

megandwade
by on Sep. 10, 2012 at 11:50 AM
There's a big discussion similar to this on the "What do you guys think about "recovery"" thread. Personally I think behaviors can change with therapy. :)
twinsnseptember
by on Sep. 10, 2012 at 11:52 AM
I agree with everything above.
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kajira
by Emma on Sep. 10, 2012 at 11:54 AM

Change doesn't mean your wiring changes, just the manifestation of behaviors.

I went through all the therapies growing up. I can fake social graces and for the most part to someone who's not looking for me to be autistic, can pass under the radar. In my brain though, I still have to go through checklists of behaviors to fake it, I just don't talk about how hard it is, or my lists to appear normal to outsiders.

You are always autistic though. the wiring is always the same - the processing is always the same, you just get better at faking it as you age- and I don't consider "faking normal" outgrowing autism. I think you are faking normal. LOL

Quoting megandwade:

There's a big discussion similar to this on the "What do you guys think about "recovery"" thread. Personally I think behaviors can change with therapy. :)


Living with Autism - The quirky kitty.

Our autistic Family - A Dad's point of view on living with Autism

Gloria1025
by Bronze Member on Sep. 10, 2012 at 11:58 AM
2 moms liked this

That's so great that he is doing so well!! I think our kids are who they are but it is wonderful when they seem to have figured out a way to cope and be happy.

aidensmomma508
by Wendy on Sep. 10, 2012 at 12:20 PM
1 mom liked this

I beleive no they can't outgrow it but find ways to cope and handle the world and progress and do better and find their true potential.  If I were you I would find a job if he has off days or soemthing then you could quit if you had to, 

WildCat73
by on Sep. 10, 2012 at 12:23 PM
1 mom liked this

My daughter is 11 she has not outgrown autism. But she no longer throws tantrums,chairs etc at the school.She was treated with therapy and she had adhd and other issues as well. it got worse when the put her on intutiv (spelling) She is allergic to it. Since she went through puberty she has not had these issues at school. We do have a issue once in a while at home but they do not last long and it is around her time of month to. She has learned to handle situations better. 

tiredmom559
by on Sep. 10, 2012 at 1:02 PM

Thank you for your replies.  I have never went through therpy or anything for this.  He was diagnosised but they were pushing meds and I will not put him on meds.  So we never went back.  I just need people that understand when we have a melt down and need people that can help me threw it. 

kajira
by Emma on Sep. 10, 2012 at 1:11 PM

I totally understand that one. I haven't had any kind of major meltdown in a long time. Most of the ones I had were as a kid, sub 10 years old.

My son is 8 1/2 and he normally just screams and cries. He's not normally violent - but the screaming, oh boy! LOL 

However, as long as he's not hurting himself, property or anyone else, I'm content to let him do what comes naturally and we slowly work on better communication over time.

sign language helps. He specifically asked me for the signs "I need help" so he could ask when he was getting to the point where he'd freak out. So, he understand there's better ways to communicate than screaming and crying, but needed to be taught or shown ways and given options... the main thing though, is he was more receptive to it when it's his idea, instead of it being forced on him by someone else as he HAD to do it.

The more he likes the idea, the more willing he is to try it.

Quoting tiredmom559:

Thank you for your replies.  I have never went through therpy or anything for this.  He was diagnosised but they were pushing meds and I will not put him on meds.  So we never went back.  I just need people that understand when we have a melt down and need people that can help me threw it. 


Living with Autism - The quirky kitty.

Our autistic Family - A Dad's point of view on living with Autism

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