Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

Clinical trial... good thing or too dangerous?

Posted by on Sep. 14, 2012 at 9:19 PM
  • 6 Replies

http://www.autismspeaks.org/science/science-news/researchers-launch-study-oxytocin-nasal-spray


I'm not sure what I think about this.  Obviously, we as mom's want the best for our children, but would this be too dangerous to even consider? I'm looking for opinions from both sides. Please just be gentle. 

I never want my son to be "normal" because most of the normal people out there act more like sheep than they do humans who can think for themselves. No offense to anyone here. Just my opinion in general, no one in specific. I just would LOVE for my son to have a few less challenges on a daily basis. 

I just don't know if the results of this would be worth any possible negative side effects.


by on Sep. 14, 2012 at 9:19 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-6):
kajira
by Emma on Sep. 14, 2012 at 10:08 PM

I wouldn't do it.

Basherte
by Silver Member on Sep. 14, 2012 at 10:34 PM

Thank you.


smarieljlee
by Sara on Sep. 14, 2012 at 10:57 PM
1 mom liked this
I don't alter my makeup with hormones. I sure wouldn't put them in my children. I am a naturalist though.
Butterfly1209
by on Sep. 15, 2012 at 12:08 AM
I wouldn't do it.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
KatyTylersMom
by Silver Member on Sep. 15, 2012 at 12:30 AM

Would I let my kid be in a trial?  Probably not.  Would I consider this when my kid hits his teen years if he is struggling with repetitive behaviors, forming and keeping friendships, and generally with being a teenager with autism which makes it like 100x worse than just being a teenager (which sucks anyway)?  Yeah.  After another 10 years I'd expect that any bad side effects would be well documented and the dosages worked out (if the study proves Oxytocin to be effective, if not then it will go by the wayside and be a non-issue). 

From what little I read on studies dealing with autism and Oxytocin it sounds like many autistics lack either receptors for, or the ability to convert oxytocin which makes it as if the person does not have enough Oxytocin in their system, even though their levels are normal.  So like any SSRI such as Prozac, giving more Oxytocin just allows there to be more available in the system.  The only negative side effect I read was a decrease in urine production at very high levels.  Safer than anti-depressants which have side effects such as suicide! 

Anyhoo, to me I'm not going to involve a kid in a clinical trial unless the behavior or condition is so out of hand and detrimental to the child's health that living with the problem is worse than whatever might happen as a result of a failed "cure".  My son does not meet that criteria and so I'd wait until Oxytocin was proven or disproven to be effective and until I felt like my kid needed it in his daily functioning. 

Basherte
by Silver Member on Sep. 15, 2012 at 1:38 PM

Thank you. I have decided to not try for the trials. And to wait to even consider it. 

My son's doctor hasn't brought up anything. Thinks my son is doing extrememly well. Loves seeing him. 

What you said here makes a lot of sense. Thank you for responding. 

Quoting KatyTylersMom:

Would I let my kid be in a trial?  Probably not.  Would I consider this when my kid hits his teen years if he is struggling with repetitive behaviors, forming and keeping friendships, and generally with being a teenager with autism which makes it like 100x worse than just being a teenager (which sucks anyway)?  Yeah.  After another 10 years I'd expect that any bad side effects would be well documented and the dosages worked out (if the study proves Oxytocin to be effective, if not then it will go by the wayside and be a non-issue). 

From what little I read on studies dealing with autism and Oxytocin it sounds like many autistics lack either receptors for, or the ability to convert oxytocin which makes it as if the person does not have enough Oxytocin in their system, even though their levels are normal.  So like any SSRI such as Prozac, giving more Oxytocin just allows there to be more available in the system.  The only negative side effect I read was a decrease in urine production at very high levels.  Safer than anti-depressants which have side effects such as suicide! 

Anyhoo, to me I'm not going to involve a kid in a clinical trial unless the behavior or condition is so out of hand and detrimental to the child's health that living with the problem is worse than whatever might happen as a result of a failed "cure".  My son does not meet that criteria and so I'd wait until Oxytocin was proven or disproven to be effective and until I felt like my kid needed it in his daily functioning. 


Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)