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Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

Calming Techniques?

Posted by on Dec. 1, 2012 at 7:40 AM
  • 11 Replies

What works?

by on Dec. 1, 2012 at 7:40 AM
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Replies (1-10):
VioletsMomTown
by on Dec. 1, 2012 at 9:29 AM

Talking softly, a little back rub or hug, a tickle, singing "don't worry be happy" or a lullaby...if all else fails I give her a few minutes to get over it with quieting the room, and I don't say a word. In public places I have resorted to giving her a few chips or letting her ride on my shoulders, 9 times out of 10 that works.

Basherte
by Silver Member on Dec. 1, 2012 at 9:40 AM

It will depend on the child. 

For mine, Depending on why he is having a meltdown, will depend on what works for him. 

When he is over stimulated.. leaving him alone with a movie he loves, a piece of a kit kat bar, and a drink usually works really well and very quickly.

When he isn't feeling well, then he wants mommy to be beside him but not touching him. Or he wants pressure therapy. So we squish him on the couch and pat his head, a little harder than a normal pat. It calms him down quickly. 


saltycoqui
by on Dec. 1, 2012 at 6:47 PM
1 mom liked this
Start by cutting down on things that over stimulates. Like too much light, open windows, other people even if they are not interacting with him. Also the tv, computer and radio even if he is not using those, then move a distance away. Holding or wearing some thing soft. Aromatherapy has also worked for us. Try to avoid foods that fill up too much, but I know peanut butter is an ok snack before getting ready for bed.

saltycoqui
by on Dec. 1, 2012 at 6:49 PM
Also keeping even a loose schedule at home helps with anxiety.
chazmom01
by on Dec. 1, 2012 at 8:16 PM

letting him go to  a Quite place helps . Let him calm down then find out what set him off

Jenn8604
by on Dec. 1, 2012 at 8:17 PM
For Hayden making him go sit by himself in the other room works best.
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Ajisai43
by Bronze Member on Dec. 1, 2012 at 9:54 PM

Oddly enough, sometimes something as simple as offering a glass of tea or ice water is enough to kind of snap my eight year old back to reality.  Or leaving the house/area for a walk and some fresh air helps.  When he was younger I would sit a ways away from him and start reading one of his favorite books in a soft voice.  Within minutes he was usually snuggled up by my side, the meltdown soon forgotten.  I have also learned that not getting sucked into his meltdown shortens the lengthy of them considerably.

Try to see what the triggers are, be a detective, and plan ways to avoid those situations.  And as time goes on, with kits if trial and error, you will find what works best according to what caused the meltdown in the first place.  Good luck!

DyerMaker
by Bronze Member on Dec. 1, 2012 at 11:03 PM

For my child, deep pressure or squeezing works. 

ciread
by on Dec. 2, 2012 at 12:26 AM

Snuggling up in a blanket, or idealy the lycra-type material that the OT's use.  For mine, a quiet corner with a book and something to hold her somewhat tightly with as little light, sound and smells as possible.  Now that she's older, a quiet walk, or dimmed lights and a book.

sweetmissy_05
by on Dec. 2, 2012 at 9:41 AM

Swaddling...my girls love to be wrapped in their blankets.  Weighted blankets,. brushing therapy, rocking, singing, listening to music, my 3 year old loves to chew so I give her a chew toy....sometimes even having her hide under a table, or behind the couch, or building her a fort will help too.

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