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Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

Study Finds Up To 50% Can Lose Autism Diagnosis

So a study was done following some children with autism. It was found that 1-20% lost diagnosis, and when early intervention and intense behavioral therapy was done, up to 40-50% of kids could lose diagnosis. Some social symptoms are thought to remain, but they would no longer be considered on the spectrum.

This is a link to the scientific article (link)

Here is a link to a video about this that was on the news today (link)



Violet's Mom

Twitter @autismnotebook

by on Jan. 17, 2013 at 9:42 PM
Replies (21-30):
terri-553
by Bronze Member on Jan. 19, 2013 at 8:04 AM

I don;t know if they ever"outgrow""it.As,they get older I am quite sure that these kids we love/adore,Can,make progress to live better lives.Outgrow Austitism I don;t think so

TheJerseyGirl
by Michele on Jan. 19, 2013 at 8:31 AM

 I dont think you can ever "cure" it, but you can absolutely make it better.  I just wish it were that easy for all autistic children!

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VioletsMomTown
by Robyn on Jan. 19, 2013 at 9:21 AM

Perhaps the way autism is defined is wrong then. The study proved that some can grow out of the diagnosis, but perhaps the diagnosis needs to be broader then. I don't see this as snake oil, or a bad thing, I think its wonderful that these kids have overcome what was holding them back. Its not saying it took away their personality, its saying it took away the diagnosis. I'm not sure you can generalize and say it will come back, or that you can't lose it, because they have yet to prove what causes it even. Every child is different, not every child will outgrow it, that seems pretty obvious by saying only 40-50% will lose diagnosis, because that leaves 50-60% who won't.


Quoting drpatriot:

This study is nothing but snake oil people. You do NOT lose autism. It is with you your whole life. You learn coping mechanisms to make it appear less than normal. You WILL have lapses and it will come back.



MommaHubbard
by on Jan. 19, 2013 at 3:26 PM
1 mom liked this

I will say that I think that this may be possible-and I'm a mom of a very newly diagnosed child with Asperger's. However, I honestly think that one of the reasons I've had such a hard time with my son's diagnosis is that I did most of the behaviors as a child that labeled him as a boy with Asperger's. I wonder if I could've been diagnosed with it as a child as well but I moved so much, it might not have been caught (usually went to 4 different schools a year in elementary school). I know he's smarter than I am but has anyone else experienced that?

I am a Geology major and would have to say that many of the people I know as science majors/practicing scientists or engineers would also probably qualify for a diagnosis of some form of the spectrum at least at some point of their lives from the list of behaviors that I have been reading. And if that's the case, it really makes you wonder if the Autism Spectrum Disorders are much more common then has been documented or is believed to be. I read somewhere that there has been an increase in diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders. I don't think this is due to a rise in Autism. I think this is due to more awareness and greater ability from the medical community through their own education to offer a diagnosis.

MissTacoBell
by Bronze Member on Jan. 19, 2013 at 3:31 PM
This made me smile. :-)
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
VioletsMomTown
by Robyn on Jan. 19, 2013 at 4:00 PM

I think that many of us see similarities from when we were children. I think some personality traits become stronger as it goes down the line with genetics. I was very smart, shy and had problems socializing a little as a child, and my husband had a bit of a learning delay which evened out after grade 1. We wondered if our daughter was just like us at first, quiet and shy. She is moderate to severe on the spectrum though, so its become more obvious as time has gone on that its not just that, and that it is classic autism. I think some more kids are being diagnosed as they understand it better, but it would be impossible to have gone from 1 in 10,000 in the 70's to 1 in 88 now without something else going on, more diagnosis can't account for that big of a difference. I knew of nobody in my school days that had autism in the way I see it manifesting nowadays. I can see very mild aspergers perhaps, that would be harder to recognize by sight, but not classic autism.

One thing that Temple Grandin always points out though, that if it wasn't for autism then there would be no silicon valley or internet, and that a lot of engineers and scientists are somewhere on the spectrum, even if they don't realize it.


Quoting MommaHubbard:

I will say that I think that this may be possible-and I'm a mom of a very newly diagnosed child with Asperger's. However, I honestly think that one of the reasons I've had such a hard time with my son's diagnosis is that I did most of the behaviors as a child that labeled him as a boy with Asperger's. I wonder if I could've been diagnosed with it as a child as well but I moved so much, it might not have been caught (usually went to 4 different schools a year in elementary school). I know he's smarter than I am but has anyone else experienced that?

I am a Geology major and would have to say that many of the people I know as science majors/practicing scientists or engineers would also probably qualify for a diagnosis of some form of the spectrum at least at some point of their lives from the list of behaviors that I have been reading. And if that's the case, it really makes you wonder if the Autism Spectrum Disorders are much more common then has been documented or is believed to be. I read somewhere that there has been an increase in diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders. I don't think this is due to a rise in Autism. I think this is due to more awareness and greater ability from the medical community through their own education to offer a diagnosis.



drpatriot
by on Jan. 20, 2013 at 7:31 AM


Quoting VioletsMomTown:

Perhaps the way autism is defined is wrong then. The study proved that some can grow out of the diagnosis, but perhaps the diagnosis needs to be broader then. I don't see this as snake oil, or a bad thing, I think its wonderful that these kids have overcome what was holding them back. Its not saying it took away their personality, its saying it took away the diagnosis. I'm not sure you can generalize and say it will come back, or that you can't lose it, because they have yet to prove what causes it even. Every child is different, not every child will outgrow it, that seems pretty obvious by saying only 40-50% will lose diagnosis, because that leaves 50-60% who won't.


Quoting drpatriot:

This study is nothing but snake oil people. You do NOT lose autism. It is with you your whole life. You learn coping mechanisms to make it appear less than normal. You WILL have lapses and it will come back.



This feeds on a parent's desire to have a "perfect" child which is disgusting and heartless. You will NEVER EVER lose the diagnosis. That is why I consider it snake oil.

VioletsMomTown
by Robyn on Jan. 20, 2013 at 8:11 AM
1 mom liked this

I'm sorry but I have to disagree, did you read the study? In fact a certain percentage do just that, lose the diagnosis. That is why I posted it. It's not heartless or cruel to wish your child didn't have an obstacle to overcome every day, or that their brain works the way others does, without coaxing. It's wonderful to be different. We all love an appreciate our kids for who they are! I don't believe in perfect, nobody is perfect. I want my daughter to have an easy life, and be happy, autism or no autism.


Quoting drpatriot:


Quoting VioletsMomTown:

Perhaps the way autism is defined is wrong then. The study proved that some can grow out of the diagnosis, but perhaps the diagnosis needs to be broader then. I don't see this as snake oil, or a bad thing, I think its wonderful that these kids have overcome what was holding them back. Its not saying it took away their personality, its saying it took away the diagnosis. I'm not sure you can generalize and say it will come back, or that you can't lose it, because they have yet to prove what causes it even. Every child is different, not every child will outgrow it, that seems pretty obvious by saying only 40-50% will lose diagnosis, because that leaves 50-60% who won't.


Quoting drpatriot:

This study is nothing but snake oil people. You do NOT lose autism. It is with you your whole life. You learn coping mechanisms to make it appear less than normal. You WILL have lapses and it will come back.



This feeds on a parent's desire to have a "perfect" child which is disgusting and heartless. You will NEVER EVER lose the diagnosis. That is why I consider it snake oil.



drpatriot
by on Feb. 4, 2013 at 8:20 AM

 You are forgetting that autistics have bull sh*t meters and I can just look at the title of the report and know that it is full of bs.

VioletsMomTown
by Robyn on Feb. 4, 2013 at 11:06 AM

The title is: Optimal outcomes in individuals with a history of autism

You really think that's bs? Apparently its not just a bs meter you have, apparently you also have an incredible gift of making optomistic people have no hope, and for being really negative about life. How's that working out for you?


Quoting drpatriot:

 You are forgetting that autistics have bull sh*t meters and I can just look at the title of the report and know that it is full of bs.



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