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asd and everything inbetween..... when did you realize something wasnt right?

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i realized it shortly after ds was born while he was still in the hospital. when he was born, i had a special blankey for him. from day one he was wrapped in it. i knew something wasnt right with him when everytime the nurses took it away from him, he was completely inconsolable. when he was transfered to nicu (body temp regulation issues and respitory infection from csection) i would get phone calls from the nurses because they couldnt calm him down. same thing happened before nicu too. id go in there and he didnt have his blanket. the sec i gave it back he instantly calmed down. its been that way ever since. i now own close to 10 of those blankets lol (not color or pattern, just the material... microfiber fleece)

by on Jan. 23, 2013 at 9:33 AM
Replies (71-76):
iamadramamomma
by on Jan. 30, 2013 at 10:09 PM
Pretty much the same thing here. My son is 6 1/2 just DX with ADHD and odd but I knew something was not right with him when he was 2. It just got worse and worse now he is in a special Ed class getting ot speech etc. But the fits the episodes are so hard to deal with.


Quoting MissTacoBell:

Word for word my story...that's bizarre...




Quoting MistyMoo:

I didn't. I only got him into early intervention because his daycare recommended it before they gave him the boot. I was SO so SO offended when they told me I should get him screened, so I went to my doctor and asked what he thought. He told me to do it because it was free to get the screening and whatnot done before kindergarten. And I did. Now here we are..


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LIMom1105
by Silver Member on Jan. 30, 2013 at 10:29 PM

I didn't see anything when my son was a baby, and even now as I review things in my mind, I still do not. His development was pretty much on target until about a year. Then he regressed a bit I know now, at a year he had a few words, then they were gone. He didn't learn any new ones until he was almost 2. I feel as if there was very little development other than gross motor between 1 and 2. And the tantrums started somewhere around a year and quickly escalated, banging his head, it was awful. At playdates he started wandering and didn't really play near the other children.  And lining up toys, spinning objects, arranging stickers in elaborate patterns (awesome really, what he could do with stickers at that age).

By 18 months, I knew something was wrong, but had no idea what it was. I had stereotypes if autism and didn't see them in him.

LilEfeesMom
by on Jan. 31, 2013 at 7:39 AM
Much like your story, my son had always seemed different since he was born. It seemed like he cried all day long. He was diagnosed with collic and cried all day and all night until we started him on melatonin around 18 months. He finally slept more than 2 hours for the first time in his life. Deep down inside I always knew he was autistic. He was just officially diagnosed with ASD 2 weeks ago. He just turned 2 in December.........I am still having such a hard time with accepting his diagnosis. I want so much more for my little boy :'(
oddgirl
by on Jan. 31, 2013 at 4:16 PM

My son was very fussy and a horrible sleeper right from the start.  He didn't sleep for more than 3 hours at a shot for the first 2 years of his life and he needed to be held and walked constantly.  He didn't crawl until his first birthday, but he also walked the same day, but then stopped and didn't walk again until he was 15 mos. 

At around 18 mos. he became very interested in letters and numbers and pointed them out everywhere we went.  That was really my first clue that he was different.  When he was 2 he became fearful of other children. I suspected he had Asperger's by then, but all the moms I knew were certain there was something wrong with their kid and I was worried I was being influenced by peer pressure.

At 3 he became obsessed with maps and could name all the states on a map of the United States, all the continents, and most of the countries of Africa and Europe.  At 4 I enrolled him in speech therapy for stuttering and pragmatics.  He started kindergarten at 5 and that's when it all came crashing down.  Two weeks into it the teacher called me in and started telling my my child was emotionally disturbed and should be placed in a special classroom. That's when we finally got the evaluation and diagnosis.  The most upsetting thing was how different he was at school than at home. School was such sensory overload he couldn't handle it.

He turns 13 in April and he's actually doing very well.  He has remained mostly mainstreamed with one or two RSP classes, he's been on the honor roll, he takes the local public transit bus to school with his friend every day.  He wants to go to a school dance.  He's even gone on a week long trip with the school.  I'm quite proud.

ermasdaughter
by on Feb. 1, 2013 at 3:05 AM


Well, it's not always an indicator of autism.  It can be a sign.  Especially when evaluated in conjunction with other symptoms that, in total, present a specific way the neurological system is developeing.  In my sons case it was one of many "signs".  In your son it may simply be a wonderful skill he has.

Quoting MomOfOneCoolKid:



Quoting ermasdaughter:

I noticed that my son wasn't developing a voice of his own and spoke almost exclusively in phrases he'd heard from documentaries (my husband and I watch all the time) or songs he'd hear or book we read.  Frequently he'd say things in the exact accent he heard them in too. It was quite disconcerting having your 19 month old repeat David Attenbouroughs description of the northern lights, accent and all!   We later learned that's called echolalia. It makes for a great party trick but I sensed that was not right.  He also organized his toys in very specific ways, was chronically constipated and had no interest in other children.  He's now almost 6 and has been in intensive therapy for most of his life and is totally fine.  He stuggles with social situations but overall he's doing great.  

I am a big believer in the benefits of early intervention.  It really is a game changer.

Forgot to add, my son is an 'aspie".  

That is quite amazing. When my son was 2 yrs old we could repeat back to me whole books (kid's bedtime books) in the car. I told another mom and she was like, really?

I said yeah. I thought he was maybe a little bit smart, but did not imagine it was autism.




MomOfOneCoolKid
by Gold Member on Feb. 1, 2013 at 2:14 PM
1 mom liked this

 


Quoting ermasdaughter:

Well, it's not always an indicator of autism.  It can be a sign.  Especially when evaluated in conjunction with other symptoms that, in total, present a specific way the neurological system is developeing.  In my sons case it was one of many "signs".  In your son it may simply be a wonderful skill he has.

Quoting MomOfOneCoolKid:
Quoting ermasdaughter:

I noticed that my son wasn't developing a voice of his own and spoke almost exclusively in phrases he'd heard from documentaries (my husband and I watch all the time) or songs he'd hear or book we read.  Frequently he'd say things in the exact accent he heard them in too. It was quite disconcerting having your 19 month old repeat David Attenbouroughs description of the northern lights, accent and all!   We later learned that's called echolalia. It makes for a great party trick but I sensed that was not right.  He also organized his toys in very specific ways, was chronically constipated and had no interest in other children.  He's now almost 6 and has been in intensive therapy for most of his life and is totally fine.  He stuggles with social situations but overall he's doing great.  

I am a big believer in the benefits of early intervention.  It really is a game changer.

Forgot to add, my son is an 'aspie".  

That is quite amazing. When my son was 2 yrs old we could repeat back to me whole books (kid's bedtime books) in the car. I told another mom and she was like, really?

I said yeah. I thought he was maybe a little bit smart, but did not imagine it was autism.

Well, my son is now 4 yrs old and it was one of many symptoms, but we're still scratching our heads as to what he "really" has.

He has been evaluated by a dev pedi and his official dx is adhd, also meeting the criteria for pdd-nos, but it presents itself right now as mainly adhd.

We've tried all the typical adhd meds -- ritalin, focalin, adderall and texnex -- none of them have worked. most have made either the adhd symptoms worse and / or increased autistic symptoms -- less eye contact, more perserveration(sp?), etc....

When the adhd meds don't work, the medical protocol is to go back and do a differential dx -- meaning, it might not be adhd... which i guess it might be pdd-nos OR maybe OCD

...

we're figuring him out. he's a tough nut to crack :/

 

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