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Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

I don't see how this type of OT is going to help her

Posted by on Jan. 30, 2013 at 1:12 PM
  • 8 Replies

We went through the state's Early Intervention program (Babies Can't Wait) and receive OT once a week for SPD. My 2yo doesn't have autism but serious sensory problems, this group is the only place remotely close to understanding what I'm talking about.

Anyway, we have had three one-hour OT sessions so far. She taught me "Brushing" and answered some questions, but for the most part all they do is play with toys. Puzzles, pull-string vibrating toys, Little People, a matching game etc.. All of which we have and play with regularly. Oh, and she taught me how to do jaw/mouth compressions today.

The brushing doesn't seem to do anything. DD likes it, but she doesn't behave any differently.

I asked her today how to handle situations like when DD insists on having a FULL bowl when she will only eat 1/4 of it (same for beverages) or when she wants something arranged in a way that I cannot accomodate. She pointed out that they are visual sensory issues but never said what to do about the problem... even though I circled back to it a couple of times.

We are going to a psychologist tomorrow for "Parent Training." Hopefully this will help. I don't want to give up on OT because it's my only hope... DD has all the sensory problems of an Autstic child but doesn't qualify for the services because she isn't truly autistic.

Advice?

by on Jan. 30, 2013 at 1:12 PM
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Replies (1-8):
Bluerose1482
by Bronze Member on Jan. 30, 2013 at 1:18 PM
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Get her a special bowl that is smaller. As far as OT goes, right now she is probably trying to identify areas to work on. Just bare with her and hopefully she'll figure out what will work for your daughter.
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kinshipcaremama
by on Jan. 30, 2013 at 1:38 PM
Give the therapy a chance. I know it looks like fun and games but it really does help.
As far as the cereal and things like that you can brainstorm different ways of handling them. Like PP said, get smaller dishes so she feels she is getting a lot but it's not too much. That really is a developmental issue. Kids want things filled up but don't get the concept that 4ounces in a little cup is the same as 4 ounces in a big cup. All they see is the little cup "appears" to have more.
blessedhappymom
by on Jan. 30, 2013 at 1:49 PM
I agree. My son had SPD as well and his OT would do different activities with him to see what he was over sensitive and under sensitive too. She helped me to understand why my son can jump for ever without getting tired and how that up and down motion is a way for him to allow the brain to process when it's being over stimulated. OT had helped so much and we've incorporated a lot of it into our daily lives. It's unbelievable how 'playing' with a purpose had helped DS.


Quoting Bluerose1482:

Get her a special bowl that is smaller. As far as OT goes, right now she is probably trying to identify areas to work on. Just bare with her and hopefully she'll figure out what will work for your daughter.

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TeapotHot
by Member on Jan. 30, 2013 at 1:51 PM

Take all the therapy you can get! I think it is a process for each child. I too asked that question. I know it all helps. I always thought my child didn't receive enough. She had therapy in our home at different times 3 to 4 times a week ( mix of Speech, O.  T. and P. T. )................and I took her to private therapy where she would have up to 5 sessions.( Mix of Speeech, O.T. and P. T. ) The sensory problems my daughter had were issues for us too!

amandae21
by on Jan. 30, 2013 at 2:06 PM

Unfortunately she is also extremely particular as to which cups, bowls, plates and utencils she will use as well. It has to be a normal sized bowl (almost always green) with a specific pink spoon. I have smaller bowls and she will use them sometimes but for the most part she wants a big one.

Thanks. We're sticking with the therapy for sure.


Quoting kinshipcaremama:

Give the therapy a chance. I know it looks like fun and games but it really does help.
As far as the cereal and things like that you can brainstorm different ways of handling them. Like PP said, get smaller dishes so she feels she is getting a lot but it's not too much. That really is a developmental issue. Kids want things filled up but don't get the concept that 4ounces in a little cup is the same as 4 ounces in a big cup. All they see is the little cup "appears" to have more.



Hottubgodess
by Jackie on Jan. 31, 2013 at 12:15 PM


Quoting amandae21:

We went through the state's Early Intervention program (Babies Can't Wait) and receive OT once a week for SPD. My 2yo doesn't have autism but serious sensory problems, this group is the only place remotely close to understanding what I'm talking about.

I have two sons with SPD - one is an aspie and highly defensive.  The other is a sensory seeker.

Anyway, we have had three one-hour OT sessions so far. She taught me "Brushing" and answered some questions, but for the most part all they do is play with toys. Puzzles, pull-string vibrating toys, Little People, a matching game etc.. All of which we have and play with regularly. Oh, and she taught me how to do jaw/mouth compressions today.

The brushing doesn't seem to do anything. DD likes it, but she doesn't behave any differently.

Brushing takes time to 'reprogam' your child.  It has to be done on a regular schedule.   Google the Wilbarger Brushing Protocol.  My 8 yr old (the aspie/defensive) was highly tactile reactive/defensive.  We brushed him every 2 hrs for 4 weeks, followed by joint compressions, then went to 3 hrs, then 4 hrs then twice a day.  It was like having a nursling again.  It really made a huge difference after a month.  He was calmer and smiled more.  He is now a goofy boy.  But it takes time and committment.  

I asked her today how to handle situations like when DD insists on having a FULL bowl when she will only eat 1/4 of it (same for beverages) or when she wants something arranged in a way that I cannot accomodate. She pointed out that they are visual sensory issues but never said what to do about the problem... even though I circled back to it a couple of times.

Try different sized bowls/cups.  :)  Same amount, but is a "full bowl".  

We are going to a psychologist tomorrow for "Parent Training." Hopefully this will help. I don't want to give up on OT because it's my only hope... DD has all the sensory problems of an Autstic child but doesn't qualify for the services because she isn't truly autistic.

Autism comes in different "shades".  My Aspie is so high functioning, he has fooled his pedi all along, most teachers, until 2nd grade when he went into full bloom.  Look at Asperger's Syndrome.  This is not classic autism (the nonverbal headbanging you might be familiar with).  These kids are bright, quirky and highly sensitive.  And girls present totally differenty than boys (they are more compliant and model behaviours better where as boys get aggressive and act out more).  

Advice?

I hope this helps.  Make sure your OT specializes in SPD Kids.  If not, request a new one with more training.  :) 


dawncs
by Dawn on Jan. 31, 2013 at 1:47 PM

It is harder to diagnose the milder end of the spectrum, and I know this fom my own personal experience. It took me three different places before I got diagnosed back in 1997. You have to realize that each state and school district have their own criteria for services for a particular diagnosis. You have to realize that Occupational Therapists have a variety of tools to use for different ages to work on different skills important to that age group. You might find http://www.wrightslaw.com/ very useful in learning more about Special Education and becoming a better active participant in the process. You also might find Autism Speaks (http://www.autismspeaks.org/) and Autism Society (http://www.autism-society.org/) very useful on the latest things regarding Autism. You might also want to check out TheARC (http://www.thearc.org/), Special Olympics (http://www.specialolympics.org/ has a young athletes program), and Easter Seals (http://www.easterseals.org/) for more programs.

Dawn
Beautifully Talanted Autistic Social Story Author
Diagnosed Asperger Syndrome as an adult
Diagnosed Edema (since young)
Author Page: http://www.toyboxunlimited.com/ (has discounts)

MomOfOneCoolKid
by Gold Member on Jan. 31, 2013 at 1:57 PM
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i went to parenting classes from my dev pedi.

i'm just sharing, don't shoot the messenger... he said he doesn't "believe in sensory integration therapy"

which if you tell an OT that they will yell kick and scream LOL

 

Those activities are actually VERY helpful to your daughter

 

As for the accomodations of how she wants things, because she is so little and doesn't have strong reasoning abilities, theres nothing you can do about it except be as understanding, sweet, and patient with her as possible. its like getting upset at a baby b/c the baby is fussy. you can't do anything about it, except try as hard as you can to console the fussy baby.

 

When she gets older and her reasoning abilities increase, you can work with her on reasonable accomodations. Like, "when we come back from the store, you can finish linning up all your toys"

Right now, i don't think you can have that conversation with a two yr old.

 

If she is NOT developmentally delayed in ANY other way (or even below average) then I would be okay with the services that they have given you. IF she is developmentally delayed in anyway, I would push as HARD as I could and get the autism dx and get the help you need ASAP.

 

Good Luck mom

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