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Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

homeschooling?

Posted by on Feb. 1, 2013 at 1:39 PM
  • 12 Replies

I've been considering homeschooling. Do you think it's important for a child with autism to go to school and have interaction there, or do you think homeschooling would be a good option so I can work with him one on one? i know NOTHING about homeschooling a special needs kid, but I'd like to hear from someone who has done it or is doing it!

My reasons for homeschooling is mainly because the public school system here is not that great. There is only one elementary school in our district that can accommodate special needs children and they are pretty packed in there. I just think it might be too overwhelming for him and I think that he might not get as much help as he needs. I don't want to keep him isolated, I would look for homeschooling groups for him so he can interact with other children and work on his social skills. 

by on Feb. 1, 2013 at 1:39 PM
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kajira
by Emma on Feb. 1, 2013 at 2:30 PM
1 mom liked this

I think homeschooling would work - for social interaction it would work better to seperate them out. regular school is hard, and theres not enough hours in the day to balance the sensory stimulation from school with socialization.

As an autistic kid, I'd have LOVED if my family would have homeschooled me and kept social  interactions seperate. I learned both better when they weren't combined.


superm0m877
by on Feb. 1, 2013 at 2:33 PM
1 mom liked this

see thats exactly what I was thinking. I was homeschooled for a few years as a kid, it was great. I think he would do much better doing it in the comfort of his own home with me, and then dealing with the social stuff seperate. 

Quoting kajira:

I think homeschooling would work - for social interaction it would work better to seperate them out. regular school is hard, and theres not enough hours in the day to balance the sensory stimulation from school with socialization.

As an autistic kid, I'd have LOVED if my family would have homeschooled me and kept social  interactions seperate. I learned both better when they weren't combined.



kajira
by Emma on Feb. 1, 2013 at 3:34 PM
2 moms liked this

i homeschool my special needs child and it works out pretty well for him - he's schizo-affective though so on a good day his social skills are perfect and on a bad day he can't be around people in general so the homeschooling allows us to tailor our day around his needs... he has friends, we just don't let them come around when he's having an off day.

he has a little sister to play with too and on his off days we just take it easy and color or watch movies and talk about simple things.

We have animals too and he helps feed/water the dogs/cats/goats which is really easy to do so he always feels like he does something useful/helpful but it's not so complicated that he freaks out that he can't do it on a bad day.

There are some days where he can't do very much even on a normal day he looks pretty much like a regular kid most of the time.


As an autistic person myself, I believe quality of social interaction is FAR more important than quantity.

Quoting superm0m877:

see thats exactly what I was thinking. I was homeschooled for a few years as a kid, it was great. I think he would do much better doing it in the comfort of his own home with me, and then dealing with the social stuff seperate. 

Quoting kajira:

I think homeschooling would work - for social interaction it would work better to seperate them out. regular school is hard, and theres not enough hours in the day to balance the sensory stimulation from school with socialization.

As an autistic kid, I'd have LOVED if my family would have homeschooled me and kept social  interactions seperate. I learned both better when they weren't combined.




Living with Autism - The quirky kitty.

Our autistic Family - A Dad's point of view on living with Autism

bugsmama149
by on Feb. 1, 2013 at 4:03 PM
3 moms liked this


I appreciate what you said about the quality of social interaction rather than quantity. I decided to homeschool my 11 yr old son at the beginning of 6th grade because he was so miserable in school. (he has ASD). My mother in law verbally attacked me for choosing to take him out of school. All I heard was "you're isolating him, he's going to be lonely".  Well, I've never seen my son happier than he is now. He takes a martial arts class 4 nights a week and he's doing extremely well. He has made a real friend there. When he was in public school his "friends" were nothing more than acquaitances. People always think that homeschooled kids are isolated from the world. And they also think that school interactions are the only interactions.....which seems weird to me since any time the kids try to talk to one another, they get in trouble. 

Quoting kajira:

i homeschool my special needs child and it works out pretty well for him - he's schizo-affective though so on a good day his social skills are perfect and on a bad day he can't be around people in general so the homeschooling allows us to tailor our day around his needs... he has friends, we just don't let them come around when he's having an off day.

he has a little sister to play with too and on his off days we just take it easy and color or watch movies and talk about simple things.

We have animals too and he helps feed/water the dogs/cats/goats which is really easy to do so he always feels like he does something useful/helpful but it's not so complicated that he freaks out that he can't do it on a bad day.

There are some days where he can't do very much even on a normal day he looks pretty much like a regular kid most of the time.


As an autistic person myself, I believe quality of social interaction is FAR more important than quantity.

Quoting superm0m877:

see thats exactly what I was thinking. I was homeschooled for a few years as a kid, it was great. I think he would do much better doing it in the comfort of his own home with me, and then dealing with the social stuff seperate. 

Quoting kajira:

I think homeschooling would work - for social interaction it would work better to seperate them out. regular school is hard, and theres not enough hours in the day to balance the sensory stimulation from school with socialization.

As an autistic kid, I'd have LOVED if my family would have homeschooled me and kept social  interactions seperate. I learned both better when they weren't combined.






kajira
by Emma on Feb. 1, 2013 at 4:21 PM
1 mom liked this

That sounds good - we go out and interact by going out to dinner once a week, we try to see our neighbors 2x a week (though living in the country, the -44 degree weather sometimes puts that on hold.)

We also used to do other activites, summer is definitely better for social activities here.

I had issues with my mom in law having the same reaction, she's very pro-school and anti homeschooling. She thinks homeschoolers are socially inept, but frankly, I think there's different kinds of people, those who don't thrive in a public school system end up feeling resentful and tortured when you COULD make their childhood more enjoyable....

Not every child has to be raised the same way. Nor is the public school system the right environment for every person.

Quoting bugsmama149:


I appreciate what you said about the quality of social interaction rather than quantity. I decided to homeschool my 11 yr old son at the beginning of 6th grade because he was so miserable in school. (he has ASD). My mother in law verbally attacked me for choosing to take him out of school. All I heard was "you're isolating him, he's going to be lonely".  Well, I've never seen my son happier than he is now. He takes a martial arts class 4 nights a week and he's doing extremely well. He has made a real friend there. When he was in public school his "friends" were nothing more than acquaitances. People always think that homeschooled kids are isolated from the world. And they also think that school interactions are the only interactions.....which seems weird to me since any time the kids try to talk to one another, they get in trouble. 

Quoting kajira:

i homeschool my special needs child and it works out pretty well for him - he's schizo-affective though so on a good day his social skills are perfect and on a bad day he can't be around people in general so the homeschooling allows us to tailor our day around his needs... he has friends, we just don't let them come around when he's having an off day.

he has a little sister to play with too and on his off days we just take it easy and color or watch movies and talk about simple things.

We have animals too and he helps feed/water the dogs/cats/goats which is really easy to do so he always feels like he does something useful/helpful but it's not so complicated that he freaks out that he can't do it on a bad day.

There are some days where he can't do very much even on a normal day he looks pretty much like a regular kid most of the time.


As an autistic person myself, I believe quality of social interaction is FAR more important than quantity.

Quoting superm0m877:

see thats exactly what I was thinking. I was homeschooled for a few years as a kid, it was great. I think he would do much better doing it in the comfort of his own home with me, and then dealing with the social stuff seperate. 

Quoting kajira:

I think homeschooling would work - for social interaction it would work better to seperate them out. regular school is hard, and theres not enough hours in the day to balance the sensory stimulation from school with socialization.

As an autistic kid, I'd have LOVED if my family would have homeschooled me and kept social  interactions seperate. I learned both better when they weren't combined.







Living with Autism - The quirky kitty.

Our autistic Family - A Dad's point of view on living with Autism

bugsmama149
by on Feb. 1, 2013 at 4:25 PM
1 mom liked this

Hi there and welcome to the group! I started homeschooling my 11 yr old son last August (beginning of 6th grade). He was miserable in school. He had reached the point where he was convinced that he couldn't learn anything. He is very high functioning (with Austism Spectrum Disorder) but social interaction has always been really hard for him. It made school so freakin hard. I couldn't stand to see him so miserable anymore so at the end of 5th grade I decided we'd start homeschooling. I made the right decision. People who disagree with homeschooling like to say that our children are isolated from the world. They assume that our kids are shut inside the house with us all day and never see the light of day!!  Our son started taking martial arts classes last September and is doing extremely well. He would've NEVER joined martial arts if he was still in public school. Having to be around all those kids all day was too much for him. He is well liked at his class and has made a real friend there. It's easier for him to make friends now that he doesn't have the daily pressure of feeling like he has to talk to everyone.  We go places, he has cousins that he's very close with, not to mention we (his parents) have an excellent relationship with him. We're a very loving, goofy, silly family and we always encourage him to let his personality out. Just be silly all he wants. He's a great kid.

Now I'm not going to lie to you and say that the homeschooling is always a breeze. It's not! It can be very difficult. It can really be taxing on our patience. I don't how your son is but mine has some really heavy issues with his focus. It can be extremely difficult to keep him on task. But what I have found is that with my son and I having all the control, we can spend alot more time on a particular subject rather than rush him through things. I remember when he was in the 5th grade and seeing him struggling so bad in math and then being moved on to even harder concepts before he had learned the easier ones. The school district we live in failed 2 yrs in a row on their state exams. Because of budget cuts they had to let go the special ed teachers aide. That would've left the one teacher with a room full of special needs kids. So even more reasons for me to homeschool. If you decide to homeschool, be prepared to have people tell you it's the wrong choice. People assume our kids are isolated inside the house all week and never see people. That's just not true. With love, patience, and guidance from you, your son will do just fine. It's not easy but when I consider the alternative, I know I made the right decision.

TheJerseyGirl
by Michele on Feb. 1, 2013 at 8:14 PM
I'm considering it when it's time for my son to go to high school. There are so many opportunities for a child to interact with other kids. I think it also benefits an autistic child to socialize in a setting that they love... You can also search for homeschooling groups in your area ... I know most meet up weekly or monthly and do some sort of activity.

Is it better to homeschool an autistic child? I don't know if there's a right answer... You have to do what you feel is right for your child and what you are comfortable with.
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darbyakeep45
by Darby on Feb. 2, 2013 at 6:14 AM

Welcome to the group!  I don't have experience with homeschooling.  All kids are different and mine does VERY well at school.  Hugs and good luck!

MommaHubbard
by on Feb. 2, 2013 at 9:10 AM

I will personally say that people assume kids that are home-schooled are socially isolated. However, I have noticed that most parents of home-schooled kids make more of an effort (or specifically carve time out-of their schedule) to make social interaction a priority. My kids got to public school (actually, I just took my son out and put him into an Autism Therapy Center where they will do a home-schooling program with him). They play with the neighbor kids but other than that they don't get as much social interaction as they may need-I need to work on that myself (I work full-time an hour away from my home in city with bad traffic and I'm in my last class to complete my BS degree in Geology minoring in Biology. I am hoping next year when I work on my graduate degree, I can just go to school full-time-we'll see what I can accomplish). Anyways, now that my son has started the Autism Therapy Center he has said that, "It's just so nice to talk to normal people like me." That made me realize that Liam has actually been in public school all this time and felt socially isolated anyways. So, how can THAT type of social interaction be good? He is really interested in Science (in particular the solar system) so, I am hoping I can find him something that will incorporate his interset too.


If I could be home with my kids I would DEFINATELY home-school. My daughter (she is NT) is struggling with her reading and the dyslexia teacher and principle at her school (the school I just pulled Liam out-of) told me that maybe reading just isn't her thing (after they told me they wouldn't do anything about her reading issue anyways until next year). That maybe she just has to work harder at reading. Then I said, "Well, she really isn't good at math either." They said, "Well, there's always drama!" If I had the ability, I would home-school all my kids. You have the flexibility to let your child work at their own pace in every subject. Your kid can work on first grade reading and fourth grade math-NO public school could ever compare to that! I would do it in a heart-beat.

momtoscott
by on Feb. 2, 2013 at 9:36 AM

 Public school has done a wonderful job with my son, who is 15 and has HFA, and the experts who have worked with him have knowledge and training I can't duplicate at home.  So for us, even though school has been stressful and difficult sometimes, it was the best option.  We happened to buy a house in a town with a great special ed program.  School systems vary, and if yours isn't set up to support SN kids, that's a big problem.  If your child is unhappy and stressed and not progressing, then home schooling could be the best thing.

I would have loathed being homeschooled, personally, since I saw school as an escape from my family and the pressures there.  That reflects my family's twisted dynamics, though. 

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