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Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

What do you think about the changes in the DSM, Aspergers and PDD no longer exist, considered Autism now?

Posted by on Feb. 11, 2013 at 12:35 PM
  • 25 Replies

My 5 year old son was just diagnosed through UCLA. Our doctor explained to us that the Diagnositc and Statistical Manual 5 was coming out in May and UCLA has already switched over to that diagnostic criteria. If my son were evaluated under DSM 4 he'd be diagnosed Aspergers, because he was diagnosed under DSM 5 it's considered Autism. I feel like Aspergers so much better explains his situation, he does not have an intellectual deficit or speech delay. How are those of you with Aspergers or PPD diagnosis handling the change, will you switch over and say your child has Autism?

by on Feb. 11, 2013 at 12:35 PM
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Replies (1-10):
amonkeymom
by Amy on Feb. 11, 2013 at 1:00 PM

My son's psych diagnosed him with the same explanation giving him the diagnosis of high functioning instead.  If anyone asks, I just explain that he's on the high end of the spectrum.

LaurieMomof4
by on Feb. 11, 2013 at 1:03 PM

Yeah, I've been trying to figure out how to explain Vaughn's situation to people. I suppose high functioning Autism is as good an explanation as any.


i would imagine it will be harder for families who've had a diagnosis of Aspergers or PDD for years, where they and their child identify with that terminology. 

emarin77
by Silver Member on Feb. 11, 2013 at 2:04 PM
1 mom liked this

Aspergers is considered mild Autism.  My son is diagnosed with this.  I am surprized he didn't explain it like that.  Autism is a spectrum disorder, not just one type of Autism.  It goes from mild/moderate/severe Autism.

03071012
by Bronze Member on Feb. 11, 2013 at 2:09 PM
I have always just said my dd was autistic. Her official diagnosis is pdd-nos.
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LaurieMomof4
by on Feb. 11, 2013 at 2:43 PM

I have friends who's children have Aspergers and PDD NOS diagnosis and they are pissed at the change in terminology because they do not consider their kids as having Autism. 

kajira
by Emma on Feb. 11, 2013 at 3:04 PM
3 moms liked this

I'm sorry, but being diagnosed with autism doesn't mean someone's stupid. I have classic autism and I'm a fully functional adult with two kids and I'm about as classically autistic as you can get trait wise.

I don't have meltdowns, though I have a lot of sensory issues, I'm very anti social, but I'm very attached to my family unit, and I'm far from stupid.

I find that assumption rather offensive and it does your child, and other autistic people a disservice to perpetuate that myth.


I do have speech issuesbut never had a speech delay as a child - but you wouldn't notice unless you tried to talk to me for hours face to face or on the phone for more then 2 minutes.


As to the intellectual delay, a lot of aspergers kids have regular intelligence and aren't super genius's either.



Living with Autism - The quirky kitty.

Our autistic Family - A Dad's point of view on living with Autism

LaurieMomof4
by on Feb. 11, 2013 at 3:33 PM

It not sure which assumption you find offensive? That Aspergers is Autism without speech delay or intellectual deficit? That is the way in which my doctor described the diagnostic criteria under DSM 4 to me. If that is inaccurate and somehow offensive I'm terribly sorry. The way he described it if my son had a speech delay or intellectual deficit under DSM 4 he would be diagnosed as having Autism, but that is not the case for him. As it stands our doctor is using the new guidelines under which my child falls under the diagnosis of Autistic Disorder.  For the purposes of dealing with the school district and my son's teachers this is confusing as thy have not been trained in DSM 5 yet. My son's teacher initially disagreed that he had Autism, but when I explained to her that his diagnosis would have formerly been considered Aspergers it made more sense. I'm sure we are all just parents trying to make good choices for our children based on a multitude of what may be new information, we've had a diagnosis for a week in my case. It's a lot, and it's all rather confusing, there was certainly no offense intended. 

A_McCool
by Bronze Member on Feb. 11, 2013 at 3:43 PM
2 moms liked this

It was all autism before; it is all autism now, and it will all be autism in the future.   We have known that Autism is a spectrum for a long time; I think combining everything into an ASD diagnosis more accurately illustrates the spectrum. 

A_McCool
by Bronze Member on Feb. 11, 2013 at 3:54 PM
1 mom liked this

It is best to think of it as the DSM 5 correcting an incorrect assumption about autism.  It was once thought than an individual could not be autistic unless there was a speech delay.  The distinction between Asperger's/PDD-NOS and Autistic Disorder really didn't do anyone any favors.  An Asperger's diagnosis does nothing to really describe the severity of symptoms and traits that ARE present; it just highlighted the ones that WEREN'T present such as absence of a speech delay.  The new diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder with a number to denote severity does a much better job of that.  The old criteria put in arbritary distinctions where they didn't really need to be made.  


Quoting LaurieMomof4:

It not sure which assumption you find offensive? That Aspergers is Autism without speech delay or intellectual deficit? That is the way in which my doctor described the diagnostic criteria under DSM 4 to me. If that is inaccurate and somehow offensive I'm terribly sorry. The way he described it if my son had a speech delay or intellectual deficit under DSM 4 he would be diagnosed as having Autism, but that is not the case for him. As it stands our doctor is using the new guidelines under which my child falls under the diagnosis of Autistic Disorder.  For the purposes of dealing with the school district and my son's teachers this is confusing as thy have not been trained in DSM 5 yet. My son's teacher initially disagreed that he had Autism, but when I explained to her that his diagnosis would have formerly been considered Aspergers it made more sense. I'm sure we are all just parents trying to make good choices for our children based on a multitude of what may be new information, we've had a diagnosis for a week in my case. It's a lot, and it's all rather confusing, there was certainly no offense intended. 



kajira
by Emma on Feb. 11, 2013 at 4:16 PM

See, the thing is abnormal speech development doesn't just mean a speech delay, and that's the problem with the old diagnoses.

Speaking in any abnormal fashion IS an abnormal speech development, even if you speak early, or late, having a speech delay isn't nessecarily autistic related either.

That's were the myths come into play.

My son and I both were diagnosed with classic ASD - we both have average, or slightly above average intelligence levels... 

My brother, who was diagnosed with aspergers is a geeky computer IT guy - with social skill problems, but had zero speech issues, and zero abnormal speech development... meaning he talks like everyone else does.

In his case, the speech development actually fit. Basing it on a criteria of JUST a speech delay is a common myth. My autism doctor explained that ANY abnormal speech development/talking patterns are what classifies it as not being aspergers... and its why they wanted to get rid of the label.

You are either autistic, or you aren't, and if you aren't, you shouldn't be put under the same umbrella.

My son was probably misdiagnosed as autistic before he got the correct label of schizophrenia, while his ASD label is still valid - I don't really think he's that autistic compared to me, or other autistic people, on his meds that take away the voices and psychosis, he acts like every other kid for the most part, and his scattered speech problems have more to due to schizophrenia than autism.... there's some over lap in the symptoms... which is why he was labeled ASD before we knew about the other issues.

My point is the diagnostic criteria was too vague, there was a lot of room for personal interpretation by doctors and it's why they had to narrow it down to be more black and white.

It made it so people who had other disabilities or delays, or intellectual disabilities, were getting incorrect labels, and with less then 60% of doctors agreeing on what "autism" was - it made it so funding was going to go away completely.

with the DSM for it to stay a valid diagnoses, it has to be usable by over 60% of physicians in the same way, or it's not a good diagnoses and they didn't have much of a choice but to get people on the same page with the criteria and definitions.

The myth that you are mentally retarded, or less intelligent if you have classic ASD vs aspergers is why a lot of us would get upset.

You can have average intelligence and be autistic, you can have above average intelligence and be autistic, or you can have learning disabilities and mental retardation issues and be autistic.

There's no intelligence qualification that's right when it comes to autism. You are either autistic, or you aren't.

People like to think that if you have aspergers, you are going to become a rich microsoft geek, and that's just not the truth, but whatever people need to believe to accept things I guess.

I know many people who have classic autism who have jobs, and many people with aspergers who can't hold down a job. It's as individual as each person who can do what, the label gives people false hope or bursts that hope because people are so caught up on labels and forget to look at the individual person.

Quoting LaurieMomof4:

It not sure which assumption you find offensive? That Aspergers is Autism without speech delay or intellectual deficit? That is the way in which my doctor described the diagnostic criteria under DSM 4 to me. If that is inaccurate and somehow offensive I'm terribly sorry. The way he described it if my son had a speech delay or intellectual deficit under DSM 4 he would be diagnosed as having Autism, but that is not the case for him. As it stands our doctor is using the new guidelines under which my child falls under the diagnosis of Autistic Disorder.  For the purposes of dealing with the school district and my son's teachers this is confusing as thy have not been trained in DSM 5 yet. My son's teacher initially disagreed that he had Autism, but when I explained to her that his diagnosis would have formerly been considered Aspergers it made more sense. I'm sure we are all just parents trying to make good choices for our children based on a multitude of what may be new information, we've had a diagnosis for a week in my case. It's a lot, and it's all rather confusing, there was certainly no offense intended. 


Living with Autism - The quirky kitty.

Our autistic Family - A Dad's point of view on living with Autism

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