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Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum
I just found out my 10 year old has aspergers. It's really a relief to finally have a reason for her behavior. My biggest problem is her tantrums, she has always been addicted to playing video games, she loves them, they are one of her obsessions. If she isn't playing them she is talking about them. Two weeks ago I had a counselor tell me to take them away, so I did. But now she is having fits everyday about wanting them back. I offered her a hour a day time limit, but this names her furious and we have hour and a half kicking and screaming tantrums every night. What do I do? Is it wrong to take away something they love so much and am I making things worse?
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by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 7:18 PM
Replies (21-25):
MomOfOneCoolKid
by Gold Member on Feb. 15, 2013 at 9:38 PM
1 mom liked this

 


Quoting drpatriot:

I had a therapist like that when I was child. My addiction then was Mickey Mouse and Disney. Mom did the smart thing and quit taken me to them. 

Is this therapist trained to work with autistic individuals? 

Are these violent games she is playing like the infamous Warcraft series? If not then there is nothing wrong with it. I am an autistic adult and most of my day is spent playing match three, hidden objects, time management and puzzle games on line. Tell her that she needs to watch it with the talking about them at school because not everyone may be that heavily into them. Also you can use this to you and her's advantage by starting a club for vedio game/computer game lovers so she can talk about it in there to her hearts content. 


That is a very good idea! I second that :)

 

smarieljlee
by Sara on Feb. 15, 2013 at 11:03 PM
1 mom liked this

There is a lot my children would miss out on if I let them play as much as they wanted. It doesn't hurt to set limits. 

Dd has taken to playing the wii. Specifically Mario kart. It teaches her turn taking, peer modeling, hand eye coordination and camaraderie! But it doesn't inhibit growth as the other games she was playing on other devices.  I reasonably expect her to grow and function independently. The goal is for her to learn balance. With time, a half hour a day may not be enough. Right now it is a reasonable time frame. It allows her to delve into her interests without causing chaos when other things need to be accomplished. It is scheduled and expected which reduces anxiety and boosts function. I also have therapy tools, certain apps that we have been introducing so she can access those if she needs an extra break to reduce anxiety when she is overwhelmed. 

As an adult, I spend way more than a half hour on my computer. It's my social outlet. It's work!(business) It's my past time. (photography) and also used as a cool down period. I also play video games with the kids! At times I do have to say enough! And list all the things that must come first

zoco
by Member on Feb. 16, 2013 at 8:10 AM
1 mom liked this

My son is 10 with Aspergers,  officially diagnosed at age 8.  He is also obsessed with video games. If not playing talking about them.  I allow him to play 30 minutes after school brefore home work. I do let him play through out the day. When I feel he has had enough I tell him to go play outside read or get a friend and find something else to do for awhile.  I don't take it away like its a punishment. And if he has done another activity for an hour he can play his games for a spell. I don't wat to take them away. 

LIMom1105
by Silver Member on Feb. 17, 2013 at 8:20 PM

I think a time limit is fine, or offer playing time as a reward for finishing something else like homework or chores. But I think the therapist was wrong to tell you to take them away completely.

I read a book written by the father of a girl with autism, I can't remember the title. But she was obsessed with a book, Monet's Garden. A therapist suggested taking it away, but they wound up building on her interest. They took her to an art museum to see Monet paintings, a trip to France, and even signed her up for French lessons. Surprisingly, she picked up French faster than English. Of course, not everyone can do all these things, but I thought it was pretty cool that they figured out a way to enhance her world through her special interest.

You can do that with video games too. Find other kids who like them too that she can play with. There may be local tournaments or opportunities to play, computer programming or game design if she's old enough. So she can do something she loves, but she's learning new skills at the same time.

joel2010
by on Feb. 17, 2013 at 9:17 PM

 i am gald you had final found and answer.  but taking away the games i think will in the long run do her some good maybe try telling her she can have a little longer time like on saturday and sunday but the rest of the week just and hour a day but if she is not doing good with the rule talk to her about losing time wiht it at all even.  there are many other things kids can do.  I knwo my son is not that age until and we have not even thought about starting him on games at all yet.  but we only let so much tv time even unless it is music and then we are doing it together or learnign thigns together. we push for him to play and do things with us in the day and then we let him do things on his own in the evening as much as we can.  I have done this with other kids i have live with others.  games are good everything is good but in the rite amount of times.  my son thing that he is obsesseion is with is trains but we do not do everything with them we do time set with them. not sure if that helps at all


Quoting haybreez02:

I just found out my 10 year old has aspergers. It's really a relief to finally have a reason for her behavior. My biggest problem is her tantrums, she has always been addicted to playing video games, she loves them, they are one of her obsessions. If she isn't playing them she is talking about them. Two weeks ago I had a counselor tell me to take them away, so I did. But now she is having fits everyday about wanting them back. I offered her a hour a day time limit, but this names her furious and we have hour and a half kicking and screaming tantrums every night. What do I do? Is it wrong to take away something they love so much and am I making things worse?


 

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