Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

natural ways of helping.....

Posted by on Mar. 9, 2013 at 1:02 AM
  • 23 Replies
I was wondering if anyone knows of a holistic medicine type place or doctor or whatever, in the northern utah area? I am very interested in helping my 2.5 yr old in a natural way. He has been dx with PDD-NOS. We will also be starting ABA therapy. I don't really know what that entails. Can someone tell me their experience with ABA? Thanks in advance
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
by on Mar. 9, 2013 at 1:02 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
KatyTylersMom
by on Mar. 9, 2013 at 2:28 AM
1 mom liked this

ABA is basically training your kid to do kid things the way you'd train a dog to do dog things - We love ABA in our house, it has really helped our son with many things (he's currently 2.5 and has been getting ABA for a little under a year).  So they will start with the most seemingly basic tasks that our kids just don't do (respond to their name for example) and break it down into it's most simple parts.  So step one - make eye contact when super fun awesome toy is held near the therapist's face.  Step two - respond to super fun toy while therapist calls his name.  Step three - respond when they call his name.  Step four - respond when they command "look at me" or "look". 

Now if your kid is higher functioning they might start with things like teaching him to respond to questions like "what's your name" or "how old are you" or they can work on turn taking, naming body parts, you name it they can shape the desired behavior. 

GOOD ABA should not feel like 2 hours of work.  It should feel like 2 min of work with 2 min of play directed by your child's preferences.  We have ours in-home, all the toys are around for our son during break times, we use food (chips, chocolate, lunch, w/e) as another reinforcer (Stack blocks then chicken nugget!) and our son is generally pretty happy to see his three therapists 5 days a week for 2 hours each time.  He knows when they show up that 1) mommy is going to go away - he won't work AT ALL if I'm present and 2) he'll have to do some work but usually after getting tickled into hysterics and chased around the room for a few minutes at the start of every session he's forgotten mommy and is happy with his therapists:)

darbyakeep45
by Darby on Mar. 9, 2013 at 7:10 AM
1 mom liked this

Well said mama...although I will say that I'm not a huge fan of comparing ABA to the way you train a dog...I don't really agree with that, but nothing wrong with differing opinions:)  Otherwise, love the way you worded this!

Quoting KatyTylersMom:

ABA is basically training your kid to do kid things the way you'd train a dog to do dog things - We love ABA in our house, it has really helped our son with many things (he's currently 2.5 and has been getting ABA for a little under a year).  So they will start with the most seemingly basic tasks that our kids just don't do (respond to their name for example) and break it down into it's most simple parts.  So step one - make eye contact when super fun awesome toy is held near the therapist's face.  Step two - respond to super fun toy while therapist calls his name.  Step three - respond when they call his name.  Step four - respond when they command "look at me" or "look". 

Now if your kid is higher functioning they might start with things like teaching him to respond to questions like "what's your name" or "how old are you" or they can work on turn taking, naming body parts, you name it they can shape the desired behavior. 

GOOD ABA should not feel like 2 hours of work.  It should feel like 2 min of work with 2 min of play directed by your child's preferences.  We have ours in-home, all the toys are around for our son during break times, we use food (chips, chocolate, lunch, w/e) as another reinforcer (Stack blocks then chicken nugget!) and our son is generally pretty happy to see his three therapists 5 days a week for 2 hours each time.  He knows when they show up that 1) mommy is going to go away - he won't work AT ALL if I'm present and 2) he'll have to do some work but usually after getting tickled into hysterics and chased around the room for a few minutes at the start of every session he's forgotten mommy and is happy with his therapists:)


girl_incognito
by on Mar. 9, 2013 at 7:45 AM

Make sure his diet is balanced and make sure he gets plenty of rest and exercise... those three factors make a huge deal, no doctor or specialist necessary for that :)

We did not do ABA, my son is an older child on the spectrum. He went through some OT and ST.

girl_incognito
by on Mar. 9, 2013 at 7:47 AM
2 moms liked this

As an adult who is planning to be evaluated for ASD, I was sad to read that analogy :(

Quoting darbyakeep45:

Well said mama...although I will say that I'm not a huge fan of comparing ABA to the way you train a dog...I don't really agree with that, but nothing wrong with differing opinions:)  Otherwise, love the way you worded this!

Quoting KatyTylersMom:

ABA is basically training your kid to do kid things the way you'd train a dog to do dog things - We love ABA in our house, it has really helped our son with many things (he's currently 2.5 and has been getting ABA for a little under a year).  So they will start with the most seemingly basic tasks that our kids just don't do (respond to their name for example) and break it down into it's most simple parts.  So step one - make eye contact when super fun awesome toy is held near the therapist's face.  Step two - respond to super fun toy while therapist calls his name.  Step three - respond when they call his name.  Step four - respond when they command "look at me" or "look". 

Now if your kid is higher functioning they might start with things like teaching him to respond to questions like "what's your name" or "how old are you" or they can work on turn taking, naming body parts, you name it they can shape the desired behavior. 

GOOD ABA should not feel like 2 hours of work.  It should feel like 2 min of work with 2 min of play directed by your child's preferences.  We have ours in-home, all the toys are around for our son during break times, we use food (chips, chocolate, lunch, w/e) as another reinforcer (Stack blocks then chicken nugget!) and our son is generally pretty happy to see his three therapists 5 days a week for 2 hours each time.  He knows when they show up that 1) mommy is going to go away - he won't work AT ALL if I'm present and 2) he'll have to do some work but usually after getting tickled into hysterics and chased around the room for a few minutes at the start of every session he's forgotten mommy and is happy with his therapists:)



JTMOM422
by Platinum Member on Mar. 9, 2013 at 8:36 AM

I don't know any holistic doctors in your area sorry. I love ABA. I have seen major improvements with my son since he began in Aug 2012. He gives eye contact. Follows some directions. His has expended his pretend play. His words have grown and he uses them appropriately. His grandparents see him 3 times a year. They were so impressed with how far he came along in such a short time. He never would acknowledge them. Now he goes to them to be picked up. He told me I love you momma for the first time a couple months ago. That was something I never thought I would hear him say. He has an ABA and an ABA tutor. Th e tutor comes daily and the ABA once a week. My ds has learned to count and recognize the numbers 1-10. He counts to twenty. He can say his abc. He even recognize some letters. He will be 3 next month. Welcome to the group

VioletsMomTown
by on Mar. 9, 2013 at 6:51 PM
1 mom liked this

Here's a list of DAN doctors (link) who treat holistically with biomedical treatments

or you can see if there is a MAPS doctor in your area (link)

You can try homeopathy, research Heilkunst or CEASE therapy




Violet's Mom

Twitter @autismnotebook

Bobsie
by on Mar. 9, 2013 at 8:37 PM
I use essential oils as a great holistic way to help son with his Autism. They have made a huge difference for him.
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
hjb2012
by on Mar. 9, 2013 at 9:42 PM
The family I worked for did ABA but decided to go with RDI instead. Lots of changes have been made with this program.
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
KatyTylersMom
by on Mar. 10, 2013 at 3:06 AM

If you have ever been to a center where they are doing ABA in a small group setting with various therapists sitting at tables with their kiddo you will often see a kid being rewarded with a fruit snack or chip for every time they perform correctly.  Without those food reinforcers they get no cooperation from that child.  For others it's a quick view of a Thomas the train episode or a turn with a toy. 

IT IS INCREDIBLY SAD that many autistic kids NEED this kind of therapy.  For all the times that I have rejoiced in listening and watching my son master a task in his ABA lessons, I have cried and cried to watch and listen to them endlessly, patiently, and competently shaping the desired behavior or response, something that any other kid would simply DO and yet my poor son has to struggle.  And I have no other analogy than to compare it to training a dog.  The dog is not stupid and neither are our kids, but they do not understand what you want them to do b/c you are not speaking their language.  So you have to model the behaviors, reinforce them 1000 times, continually review the behaviors already learned, and provide the "treats" that motivate. 

Here's a video that shows what I have experienced as a typical part of an ABA session.  This kiddo is a bit more verbal than my son (and a bit older) but you can get the gist of it - he's working for M&M's as a reward and he has to complete his tasks before he gets his candy:) I can't say it enough: ABA has been wonderful for our son - he has learned how to be A KID bit by bit and the basics of learning to LOOK, learning to ENGAGE, and learning to VOCALIZE have let him become so much more interactive and involved in life and with his family.  It's not right for every kid - my daughter, also PDD-NOS, would need a much different approach b/c she has TONS of language and doesn't need that low-level basic training.  So judge for yourself if it's working for your kiddo and if not, whether it's b/c you need a change of theraPIST or a change of theraPY:)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NbVG8lYEsNs


Quoting girl_incognito:

As an adult who is planning to be evaluated for ASD, I was sad to read that analogy :(

Quoting darbyakeep45:

Well said mama...although I will say that I'm not a huge fan of comparing ABA to the way you train a dog...I don't really agree with that, but nothing wrong with differing opinions:)  Otherwise, love the way you worded this!

Quoting KatyTylersMom:

ABA is basically training your kid to do kid things the way you'd train a dog to do dog things - We love ABA in our house, it has really helped our son with many things (he's currently 2.5 and has been getting ABA for a little under a year).  So they will start with the most seemingly basic tasks that our kids just don't do (respond to their name for example) and break it down into it's most simple parts.  So step one - make eye contact when super fun awesome toy is held near the therapist's face.  Step two - respond to super fun toy while therapist calls his name.  Step three - respond when they call his name.  Step four - respond when they command "look at me" or "look". 

Now if your kid is higher functioning they might start with things like teaching him to respond to questions like "what's your name" or "how old are you" or they can work on turn taking, naming body parts, you name it they can shape the desired behavior. 

GOOD ABA should not feel like 2 hours of work.  It should feel like 2 min of work with 2 min of play directed by your child's preferences.  We have ours in-home, all the toys are around for our son during break times, we use food (chips, chocolate, lunch, w/e) as another reinforcer (Stack blocks then chicken nugget!) and our son is generally pretty happy to see his three therapists 5 days a week for 2 hours each time.  He knows when they show up that 1) mommy is going to go away - he won't work AT ALL if I'm present and 2) he'll have to do some work but usually after getting tickled into hysterics and chased around the room for a few minutes at the start of every session he's forgotten mommy and is happy with his therapists:)





girl_incognito
by on Mar. 10, 2013 at 8:18 AM
1 mom liked this

I am completely aware of what ABA is. I've been around "the block" a few times, seeing that my son is nearly 15 years old, I've seen and experienced a good deal. I've also READ and RESEARCHED a lot.  I was not attacking your opinion nor your use of ABA, but your analogy WAS quite sad to ME. I believe you love your child and want the best for him, I think every mother here absolutely wants what is best for their child.

They use food reinforcers for my teenager at school (and his program is not ABA based that's just PBI), but I would never compare that to training a dog. It's called reinforcing positive behaviors, no need for the dog training analogy. I was trying to convey that those words and that analogy hurt, that way you may be more aware of your use of words. You have to understand that when someone thinks literally, analogies of that kind cut deep. The visual in my head when I read that was quite disturbing and upsetting. I will never be convinced that the analogy you used is OK... I was also not the first mother to disagree with the use of that analogy. So I don't understand why you quoted me specifically.  I came into this thread to tell the OP that the most important factors are diet, exercise and rest... those are the building blocks. Second I quoted Darby to agree with her, not to condemn your choice to use ABA. 

I did not want to make this a debate and I did not want to attack anyone, that was not my intention.


Quoting KatyTylersMom:

If you have ever been to a center where they are doing ABA in a small group setting with various therapists sitting at tables with their kiddo you will often see a kid being rewarded with a fruit snack or chip for every time they perform correctly.  Without those food reinforcers they get no cooperation from that child.  For others it's a quick view of a Thomas the train episode or a turn with a toy. 

IT IS INCREDIBLY SAD that many autistic kids NEED this kind of therapy.  For all the times that I have rejoiced in listening and watching my son master a task in his ABA lessons, I have cried and cried to watch and listen to them endlessly, patiently, and competently shaping the desired behavior or response, something that any other kid would simply DO and yet my poor son has to struggle.  And I have no other analogy than to compare it to training a dog.  The dog is not stupid and neither are our kids, but they do not understand what you want them to do b/c you are not speaking their language.  So you have to model the behaviors, reinforce them 1000 times, continually review the behaviors already learned, and provide the "treats" that motivate. 

Here's a video that shows what I have experienced as a typical part of an ABA session.  This kiddo is a bit more verbal than my son (and a bit older) but you can get the gist of it - he's working for M&M's as a reward and he has to complete his tasks before he gets his candy:) I can't say it enough: ABA has been wonderful for our son - he has learned how to be A KID bit by bit and the basics of learning to LOOK, learning to ENGAGE, and learning to VOCALIZE have let him become so much more interactive and involved in life and with his family.  It's not right for every kid - my daughter, also PDD-NOS, would need a much different approach b/c she has TONS of language and doesn't need that low-level basic training.  So judge for yourself if it's working for your kiddo and if not, whether it's b/c you need a change of theraPIST or a change of theraPY:)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NbVG8lYEsNs



Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)