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Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

Help!!

Posted by on Apr. 1, 2013 at 10:43 AM
  • 15 Replies

We just got our diagnosis of Aspergers/high functioning Autism for our 5 year old.  He is a very picky eater/easily stressed out by new food or trying food and we have been referred to a feeding clinic for it.  Do any of you have experience with feeding clinics??  We are being sent to the Monroe Myer feeding clinic which comes highly recommended.  When the process was described to me that sent me into a panic attack.   Any insight I would greatly appreciate!   It  seems like this would just stress my little one out more and cause more of a feeding/eating issue.

 

by on Apr. 1, 2013 at 10:43 AM
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Replies (1-10):
amonkeymom
by Amy on Apr. 1, 2013 at 11:55 AM
1 mom liked this

I don't have experience with this type of situation, but want to wish you much luck!

dawncs
by Dawn on Apr. 1, 2013 at 12:07 PM

Welcome to the group! I have no experience with feeding clinics. However, there is help for your son. You need to contact his elementary school in writing and request an evaluation for Special Education services (http://www.wrightslaw.com/) and Occupational Therapy (OT) services. You can read more about Asperger Syndrome at http://www.aspergersyndrome.org/ and http://www.autism-society.org/. Joining clubs, activities, and sports that interests him is a great way to help him make friends with similar interests to him since making friends is a struggle with that diagnosis. For activities, I suggest Special Olympics (http://www.specialolympics.org/), TOPSoccer (http://www.topsoccer.us/), TheARC (http://www.thearc.org/), and Variety Club (http://www.usvariety.org/).

Dawn


Group owner of Different Learners Support Group (http://www.cafemom.com/group/118648)

unusualmom
by on Apr. 1, 2013 at 12:35 PM
1 mom liked this

My son went to a feeding clinic.  didnt ork.  He refused to eat everything put in front of him and if he didnt eat it they waited him out.  Thing is - he can wait them out longer than they can wait him out.

Mi_Chelly
by Bronze Member on Apr. 1, 2013 at 12:43 PM

I do deal with a child that is a "picky eater" but I have never been to a feeding clinic. We just watch what he eats and try to make sure he gets all his vitumens one way or another. 

Hopefully it doesn't stress you or your little one out too much.

hennen
by on Apr. 1, 2013 at 1:04 PM
My son changes everyday what he will eat. Hot dogs is his fav for a week then it will be peanut butter and jam sandwich. This is what helped my son. (I couldn't afford the clinic) I would make dinner with some of his fav add to the meal we would say "you eat what you get" at every meal, I would make his plate with his fav and two extra small pieace of whatever he didn't like.. trust me it took along time and we still have problems because my son will go hungry and won't eat anything even his ok foods... my sons food changes everyday the texture could be off one day to the next.. It helpes when I had my son help me plan the next lunch dinner or whatever. Like I said I'm still working with him on the one and its hard, but he is getting a lot better. He will even tell his sister when she throws a fit at dinner "you eat what you get""
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mommy4lyf
by on Apr. 1, 2013 at 1:08 PM

My son used to be worst when it comes to eating but not just because of sensory issues. He have sleep apnea, tonsilitis, chronic sinusitis and etc.. We had his tonsils and adenoid removed 1 1/2 ago. Since then, he would try anything, and tells me which one he likes and which one he doesnt' like.

Sorry, this is all I got.

OFIH
by on Apr. 1, 2013 at 1:19 PM

I haven't used that clinic, but we have been in feeding therapy. It was the best thing we did for our younger son at the time. He wasn't able to get off of medical food at all. He had a lot of food reactions, coupled with sensory issues in the mouth and oral motor weakness, oy! It was a lot of work, harder on us I think as we had to remember how to feed him properly and do what they asked us to do. It wasn't all butterflies and ponies. But my son now eats full meals. We still have to help him eat occasionally, but he eats all his food and that's what counts at this point. He has expanded his food likes 100 fold. And, now that we understand feeding therapy, we can use it to help him learn to like more and more foods. He's used to it, knows he's in control, and allows the new foods to be introduced so much quicker. Back then it wasn't uncommon for us to spend 2 weeks in the "if you let it sit on the table in the same room with us" phase. He was so intolerant.

You can do this!!!!!!

OFIH - Controller of chaos, laugher at children's antics, creator of messes, lover of God.
ChristinaNJ
by on Apr. 1, 2013 at 2:56 PM

I know what you mean.. My son was 2 and was sent to a feeding clinic but it was very helpful. My son when he would eat, he would roll his tounge to the back of his mouth, and I didn't know. They showed me how to feed him, to teach him, how to not roll his tounge. NO wonder he would only eat pureed food. Then they also found that he had acid reflux which is why he was never hungry and only wanted stuff to drink. Go check it out keep an open mind :) good luck mom! 

ChristinaNJ
by on Apr. 1, 2013 at 2:58 PM

I also started to give my son vitamins in his milk so it would make him hungry. Also, I switched him to Lactaid milk which is easier for his stomach to process and doesn't fill him so he wants to know eat. 

lucasmadre
by Kari on Apr. 1, 2013 at 9:38 PM
I have never been to a feeding clinic but I did have a hesitant eater. I gave him vitamins, found the things he did like and didn't pressure him about the stuff he didn't like. Eventually he came around (same diagnosis by the way.) I found the more I focused on food the more resistant he became. He now is 9, has his favorites but will try anything as long as I don't force him to eat it if he doesn't like it. I found getting him involved with preparing his own food helped to give him the feeling of control and he was more likely to eat it. Had to give up having a perfectly clean kitchen all the time but it was good for me :) Follow your heart, you know him better than anyone....good luck! XO
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