Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

Echolalia

Posted by on Apr. 5, 2013 at 12:47 AM
Jen
  • 28 Replies
Do any of your kids do this? What does echolalia look like in your child?

My son will repeat words he hears us say. For example, if I ask him: do you want to go to the park? He will say "Park!" Yet, I know that means no.

I noticed him doing it at school. They said, here is a toy. Do you want it? He replied, want it. But he didnt want it.

So I made a point to tell the Speech path and she said, yes that is echolalia and she does notice him doing it. Then, I observed his language eval today and noticed it more. If she asked him something he didnt know, he just repeated her words. She'd say: what do you do when you're thirsty? And he would just say: thirsty.

He also can say words and short sentences independently. I didn't realize you could have echolalia too.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
by on Apr. 5, 2013 at 12:47 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
megandwade
by Member on Apr. 5, 2013 at 1:12 AM
1 mom liked this

I don't have personal experience but I learned a lot about echolalia from my son's speech therapist. He is currently non-verbal but they told us of all the signs and warned us this maybe something to watch out for...   She told us a way to work on it is talk as they would talk. For example. "I'm thirsty. I'll get a drink" instead of asking "Are you thirsty?" "Do you want a drink?" Keep it short and to the point, and make statements rather then ask questions.. That's what she told us anyway.. :)

emily113
by on Apr. 5, 2013 at 1:36 AM

My son Matthew does this. If we ask him How was school? he will say "how was school?" It seems to be very hard for him to figure out how to word the answer. Some questions like do you want an apple he will repeat back and if you say does matthew want an apple then he catches it and answers yes or no.  I don't know if that is the way your supposed to do it but I am just happy to get an answer. I always thought he was repeating things because we spent so much time trying to get him to talk by telling him what to say.

KatyTylersMom
by Silver Member on Apr. 5, 2013 at 2:16 AM

For my daughter it is having memorized the words or even the sounds of words from her favorite shows and movies - she has no idea what some of the words mean for example from Cars 2 she'll say major parts of the movie along with the characters but it's not like she knows what the words "If I can just... reverse... the polarity..." mean but she'll say them right along with Miss Holly Shiftwell. 

She also did the whole repeating what you just said thing but for her it was in place of the word "yes".  We did not get a single 'yes' out of that child until 5 months of speech therapy and she was 3.5 years old.  Shortly thereafter we got her PDD-NOS diagnosis b/c normal 3.5 year olds say the word 'yes'.  So you'd say hey Katy do you want a pickle? and she'd respond PICKLE!!! If she didn't want something she had no problem saying NO:)

For my son it's more of an issue with him having little verbal language to begin with (my daughter had and has tons) so he'll repeat what you said WHILE he's still thinking about it.  So you might ask hey Tyler, do you want the red car? and he'll say 'red car!' but then reach for the green car.  When you then say "oh well which did you want?" he'll think about it and say "green car" but his mouth is kind of hooked up to his internal monologue so you'll get a lot of him repeating what we say, and a lot of him repeating while thinking and then changing his mind and stating his ACTUAL choice.  Yes and No are still areas he's working on, he'll sometimes shake his head 'No' when he REALLY means it but otherwise will just lose interest and move on.  For 'yes' we're drilling it 5 min several times a day say with a bag of chips - Tyler do you want a chip? 'yes' here have a chip.  At first he'll start out just echoing our 'yes' prompt but then he'll realize he's being asked a question and he gets the chip faster if HE answers it rather than repeating our answer, and then having to say it again himself to get the chip. 

03071012
by Bronze Member on Apr. 5, 2013 at 2:36 AM
My daughter has echolalia. The school didn't agree that it was echolalia. They said it was normal. She does those same things you described your son doing. My dd gets speech through a private company and it is getting better
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
darbyakeep45
by Darby on Apr. 5, 2013 at 6:30 AM

I've honestly never heard of that before...interesting!  Brady's nonverbal so I don't have experience with that:)  Hugs!

BKozICan
by Member on Apr. 5, 2013 at 6:38 AM

Early on, T was just like you describe--ask Do you want juice or water and he'd say water even though he wanted juice (and then the meltdown when he got it to his mouth and it wasn't juice).  Now is more that he repeats the whole question and then answers it, almost like he needs just that extra seconds to formulate the answer.


Our other is his rote phrases--what's for dinner, can I watch a movie, or what's the calendar. He uses those when he wants to ask something or start a conversation and doesn't know how.

mypbandj
by Jen on Apr. 5, 2013 at 8:09 AM
Speaking of rote phrases, I'm wondering if my ds does this too. Almost everything he says is one word at a time, pauses inbetween each word so his speech is not fluid. Except for some rote phrases. Like, he can say "bye friends! See you soon!" And it comes out perfectly clear. And if anything drops or falls it someone says ouch, he almost will sing, "sorry!" A lot of the time it seems appropriate but sometimes it isn't. Like yesterday during his language eval, something fell in the room next to him and there was a boom. He immediately said: sorry! So now I'm wondering if these rote phrases are actually echolalia and not improvements in his usual non-fluid speech??

Quoting BKozICan:

Early on, T was just like you describe--ask Do you want juice or water and he'd say water even though he wanted juice (and then the meltdown when he got it to his mouth and it wasn't juice).  Now is more that he repeats the whole question and then answers it, almost like he needs just that extra seconds to formulate the answer.


Our other is his rote phrases--what's for dinner, can I watch a movie, or what's the calendar. He uses those when he wants to ask something or start a conversation and doesn't know how.

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
mypbandj
by Jen on Apr. 5, 2013 at 8:11 AM
Stupid schools. LOL

Did you know that you can disagree with their eval and make them pay for an independent eval? I had to do that with my other son once.


Quoting 03071012:

My daughter has echolalia. The school didn't agree that it was echolalia. They said it was normal. She does those same things you described your son doing. My dd gets speech through a private company and it is getting better
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
mypbandj
by Jen on Apr. 5, 2013 at 8:12 AM
It's funny how your dd does it in place for yes and my ds does it for no. LOL

He also memorizes parts of movies and says them Along with with the movie. He even insists on acting out the movie. But I haven't heard him do it unless the movie is on.


Quoting KatyTylersMom:

For my daughter it is having memorized the words or even the sounds of words from her favorite shows and movies - she has no idea what some of the words mean for example from Cars 2 she'll say major parts of the movie along with the characters but it's not like she knows what the words "If I can just... reverse... the polarity..." mean but she'll say them right along with Miss Holly Shiftwell. 

She also did the whole repeating what you just said thing but for her it was in place of the word "yes".  We did not get a single 'yes' out of that child until 5 months of speech therapy and she was 3.5 years old.  Shortly thereafter we got her PDD-NOS diagnosis b/c normal 3.5 year olds say the word 'yes'.  So you'd say hey Katy do you want a pickle? and she'd respond PICKLE!!! If she didn't want something she had no problem saying NO:)

For my son it's more of an issue with him having little verbal language to begin with (my daughter had and has tons) so he'll repeat what you said WHILE he's still thinking about it.  So you might ask hey Tyler, do you want the red car? and he'll say 'red car!' but then reach for the green car.  When you then say "oh well which did you want?" he'll think about it and say "green car" but his mouth is kind of hooked up to his internal monologue so you'll get a lot of him repeating what we say, and a lot of him repeating while thinking and then changing his mind and stating his ACTUAL choice.  Yes and No are still areas he's working on, he'll sometimes shake his head 'No' when he REALLY means it but otherwise will just lose interest and move on.  For 'yes' we're drilling it 5 min several times a day say with a bag of chips - Tyler do you want a chip? 'yes' here have a chip.  At first he'll start out just echoing our 'yes' prompt but then he'll realize he's being asked a question and he gets the chip faster if HE answers it rather than repeating our answer, and then having to say it again himself to get the chip. 

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
mypbandj
by Jen on Apr. 5, 2013 at 8:18 AM
At my sons school I notice they prompt the kids a lot with "you can say yes or no." And then after the kid says yes or no they say "thanks for telling me."

I was reading about echolalia last night online and almost every article agreed that echolalia is a good sign for ASD kids.


Quoting emily113:

My son Matthew does this. If we ask him How was school? he will say "how was school?" It seems to be very hard for him to figure out how to word the answer. Some questions like do you want an apple he will repeat back and if you say does matthew want an apple then he catches it and answers yes or no.  I don't know if that is the way your supposed to do it but I am just happy to get an answer. I always thought he was repeating things because we spent so much time trying to get him to talk by telling him what to say.

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)