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Empathy and Autism

Posted by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 8:26 PM
  • 14 Replies
6 moms liked this


Violet's Mom

Twitter @autismnotebook

by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 8:26 PM
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Replies (1-10):
maciymommieof3
by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 9:38 PM

hmmmmm.....


Definition: The ability to understand another person’s circumstances, point of view, thoughts, and feelings. When experiencing empathy, you are able to understand someone else’s internal experiences.






VioletsMomTown
by Robyn on Apr. 23, 2013 at 9:58 PM

I know my daughter knows exactly how I feel. She literally reads my mind. I have to be careful what I think! If I am thinking about Santa Claus in April, next thing you know she starts watching a Christmas video she hasn't watched in months. I was thinking about going for a car ride on the weekend, and she walked up to me, tapped me on the arm and said "car"?  She can read peoples emotions in a moment of meeting them. She is so incredibly sensitive, its like the total opposite of lacking empathy. She has super-empathy.


Quoting maciymommieof3:

hmmmmm.....


Definition: The ability to understand another person’s circumstances, point of view, thoughts, and feelings. When experiencing empathy, you are able to understand someone else’s internal experiences.








Violet's Mom

Twitter @autismnotebook

Charizma77
by Carissa on Apr. 23, 2013 at 10:28 PM
1 mom liked this

Thanks for sharing!

JTMOM422
by Brenda on Apr. 23, 2013 at 10:33 PM
1 mom liked this

Thank you so much for posting this. This is right on the spot. I so hate it when people say that people with ASD have no empathy. 

JackandLilysmom
by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 11:39 PM
1 mom liked this

So true, my son feels so much.  If his sister gets hurt or in trouble his concern for her is overwhelming.  He may not always know how to act socially when in these situations but it does not mean he does not know it's happening.

mypbandj
by Jen on Apr. 23, 2013 at 11:49 PM
My son shows a lot of empathy!

As a preschooler, others thought he was mean cause he'd run into other kids and not seem to care. The truth was, he didnt even know what he was doing was affecting them. But when told him, he felt bad.
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mariat2
by Maria on Apr. 25, 2013 at 11:29 AM
My son has empathy...I Am teaching him about other peoples feelings too
kajira
by Emma on Apr. 25, 2013 at 2:07 PM
1 mom liked this

i actually think of this more as symapthy, if someone talks about their dog dying, I have a lot of compassion because I understand how it feels.

The reality is : I don't have empathy the way most people do. I can sympathize and try to find some way to relate, but the other part of the reality is, it's too much work to feel all those emotions I don't usually feel, just to make other people feel better.

People are overly emotional and all over the place in a way that makes my head hurt. I simply cannot keep up with them and understand how you can be happy one minute then grumpy over something stupid the next. 

people hurt my brain. LOL

I like being around people who are blunt with their thoughts, feelings and emotions. I like knowing where I stand with them with out having to guess all the time. Guessing hurts my head... I'm often wrong.

My daughter has what I consider a high level of empathy. If she sees you frowning, she immediately comes up and asks you if you are sad or frustrated, then tries to see if she can cheer you up. If she sees you happy, she laughs and tries to interact with you as if you were happy or excited.

The kind of "observational" thing was something I had to try hard to learn and still don't have at almost 28.


VioletsMomTown
by Robyn on Apr. 25, 2013 at 3:32 PM

I think of you as having empathy for others, because you have shared so much information which has helped many parents on here understand their kids with autism. You seem to able to put yourself in their shoes and give your perspective on what might help.You probably do the same thing with your kids, empathy is part of  motherly instinct.



Quoting kajira:

i actually think of this more as symapthy, if someone talks about their dog dying, I have a lot of compassion because I understand how it feels.

The reality is : I don't have empathy the way most people do. I can sympathize and try to find some way to relate, but the other part of the reality is, it's too much work to feel all those emotions I don't usually feel, just to make other people feel better.

People are overly emotional and all over the place in a way that makes my head hurt. I simply cannot keep up with them and understand how you can be happy one minute then grumpy over something stupid the next. 

people hurt my brain. LOL

I like being around people who are blunt with their thoughts, feelings and emotions. I like knowing where I stand with them with out having to guess all the time. Guessing hurts my head... I'm often wrong.

My daughter has what I consider a high level of empathy. If she sees you frowning, she immediately comes up and asks you if you are sad or frustrated, then tries to see if she can cheer you up. If she sees you happy, she laughs and tries to interact with you as if you were happy or excited.

The kind of "observational" thing was something I had to try hard to learn and still don't have at almost 28.




Violet's Mom

Twitter @autismnotebook

kajira
by Emma on Apr. 25, 2013 at 3:46 PM

But I do it because it's logical, not out of an emotional response.

I feel strong emotions around my children, I love my children - but my reasons for trying to understand or make decisions are based on logic, not emotion.

People often use emotion to make decisions and I often think those knee-jerk emotional reactions so many people have are why so many people make irrational decisions in heat of the moment.

If you stop and pause and think with logic - you are better able to make a rational decision for the bigger picture.

I don't have empathy the way most people do... and I'm fine with that. I don't think you need to be empathic to be a good person, make sound decisions, or even care about other people.

Example, if a baby cries, my natural instinct is to feed it, check it's diaper, rock it , etc. I don't "feel" sad that the baby's crying.... my mom in law freaks if a baby cries and "feels" sad in situations that make no sense to me. When I think of empathy, I think of people who "feel" the emotions other people are feeling when they see them. 

I can't do that, never have been able too, and frankly, that kind of emotional thing I see so many people do, confuses me.... It makes no sense to feel sad if you see someone else feeling sad. Nothing happened to you and if you want any chance of fixing the situation or cheering them up, feeling sad may cloud your judgement. 

^.^

Quoting VioletsMomTown:

I think of you as having empathy for others, because you have shared so much information which has helped many parents on here understand their kids with autism. You seem to able to put yourself in their shoes and give your perspective on what might help.You probably do the same thing with your kids, empathy is part of  motherly instinct.



Quoting kajira:

i actually think of this more as symapthy, if someone talks about their dog dying, I have a lot of compassion because I understand how it feels.

The reality is : I don't have empathy the way most people do. I can sympathize and try to find some way to relate, but the other part of the reality is, it's too much work to feel all those emotions I don't usually feel, just to make other people feel better.

People are overly emotional and all over the place in a way that makes my head hurt. I simply cannot keep up with them and understand how you can be happy one minute then grumpy over something stupid the next. 

people hurt my brain. LOL

I like being around people who are blunt with their thoughts, feelings and emotions. I like knowing where I stand with them with out having to guess all the time. Guessing hurts my head... I'm often wrong.

My daughter has what I consider a high level of empathy. If she sees you frowning, she immediately comes up and asks you if you are sad or frustrated, then tries to see if she can cheer you up. If she sees you happy, she laughs and tries to interact with you as if you were happy or excited.

The kind of "observational" thing was something I had to try hard to learn and still don't have at almost 28.





Living with Autism - The quirky kitty.

Our autistic Family - A Dad's point of view on living with Autism

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