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Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

What are the differences among the spectrum?

Posted by on May. 1, 2013 at 3:32 PM
  • 39 Replies

I have read and read and read a bunch of stuff online and in books.

Yet I am not totally ocnvinced that I KNOW the difference between all the different flipping labels that are used to describe the type of autism a child may have. Or does it even matter.

My son, very likely has PDD-NOS.

So questions:

For mums whose kids have had that specific diagnosis, what is life like for you? Do you know if the way your child behaves is any different that another child that has a different diagnosis, say classic autism or Aspergers?

Or do all children, regardless of where they are on the spectrum, behave and interact the same?

Does anyone know? (personal expereince required)


~ confused


by on May. 1, 2013 at 3:32 PM
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Replies (1-10):
mypbandj
by Jen on May. 1, 2013 at 3:45 PM
2 moms liked this

Autism is a spectrum, effecting everyone differently. Not all kids are alike and they all have different symptoms. There are new guidelines to how it is being diagnosed - and supposedly, everything (pdd-nos, aspergers, autism, etc) are all just going to be lumped into one label - AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER.

Now, I've heard that some people are very upset by this, especially the aspergers community. They don't want to lose their label/identity. So I'm not really sure what is going to happen with that. 

Here is a blog that talks about the new changes. 

RJsMummy
by on May. 1, 2013 at 3:57 PM

Yeah I heard about that, the changing of the rules.

But I just wanted to hear from "real" mums that have experienced the differences, in symptoms and how they cope, but especially the quality of lives their children lead. 

she-ra2000
by on May. 1, 2013 at 11:04 PM

I think there are similarities and differences in all, with or without autism. My son has Aspergers, but I know someone w/ an asperger son  a few yrs older than my son and his is more severe or noticeable. But even though my son just got dx this yr, I always noticed some things he had in common with her son.

she-ra2000
by on May. 1, 2013 at 11:07 PM

 My son has Apergers. I agree that is still a part of autism, so it's autism. Every child on the spectrum is unique in their own way.


Quoting mypbandj:

Autism is a spectrum, effecting everyone differently. Not all kids are alike and they all have different symptoms. There are new guidelines to how it is being diagnosed - and supposedly, everything (pdd-nos, aspergers, autism, etc) are all just going to be lumped into one label - AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER.

Now, I've heard that some people are very upset by this, especially the aspergers community. They don't want to lose their label/identity. So I'm not really sure what is going to happen with that. 

Here is a blog that talks about the new changes. 


 

TheLadyAmalthea
by Bronze Member on May. 1, 2013 at 11:54 PM

Well, my son has been diagnosed with regular autism. There are no other labels that go with it. He is 90% non-verbal. He has some words he just started using in the past couple of months. He is 5. He screams a lot. Especially while we are driving. He also runs away from us and has no concept of danger. He isn't fully potty trained. He will pee in the toilet, but won't do much else in there. I clean poop out of the carpet a lot. I'm tired of cleaning poop out of the carpet :( It is very hard for me to relate to moms with aspies or higher functioning children. My child is totally different. Not to say moms of higher functioning kids don't experience the same emotions I do, but our life is just different, know what I mean? So while their child may be having a hard time with social interactions, my son is having a hard time not screaming when another child is near him. So we can find some common ground and comradery, but is is hard to share advice.

kajira
by Emma on May. 2, 2013 at 1:58 AM

I'm an adult with classic autism - meaning, I scored way off the charts on the autism spectrum.... I'm married with two kids. 


I do have speech issues, which I make up for by typing. I do flap, and have many sterotypical traits, including sensory issues. I don't really have anxiety, but that's due to a lot of hard work to fix my communication and understand why I was different so I wouldn't get so upset when people got frustrated with me, or we constantly misunderstood each other.

I don't really like people and tend to be very anti social and off in my own little world, but it has a point. I'm usually thinking about things I need to do, or want to do - I process a lot slower than the average person, so my thinking process happens differently.

I tend to be less emotional and more logical than many people, and it has both pro's and con's. (I often get people mad at me because I dont' show the right emotions, or seem to have empathy about their lives or stituation... and while I can CARE - I jsut don't see the point of getting all emotional about it. like I said, logical.) 



My son is also diagnosed with autism and a couple of other disorders... he still has accidents at 9, but his verbal speech and social communication skills are better than mine, on a good day, he'd just pass as a quirky ADD kind of kid.... where-as my speech issues are extremely obvious as an adult.... ^.^

My brother is aspergers, and he can handle having a normal job - where-as my speech and sensory issues make it so I can't work a normal job - but I do fine working from home, and raising my kids and animals.


My son is extremely high functioning, but i've cleaned poop out of my carpet from him no less then 3x in the last 2 months.  - And he's 9.

Living with Autism - The quirky kitty.

Our autistic Family - A Dad's point of view on living with Autism

shugerbit
by Member on May. 2, 2013 at 6:58 AM


i feel this way also.  i understand all children under the spectrum have issues, but i think it is very broad.  my son is dx classic autism, is nonverbal, has a few signs, has no fear of danger, is a runner, and has a very low age for receptive language, like he can't follow even simple commands like, come here, get your shoes or anything.  if we can't figure out what he wants he often smashes his head off the wall, or sometimes for fun because he likes the feeling. I am not bashing aspie moms, but i can't really relate to them, as they can't really relate to me.  I have one of my best friends, her son is older and pdd and our sons have some similar issues, but her son can now talk and is more violent then mine.  

Quoting TheLadyAmalthea:

Well, my son has been diagnosed with regular autism. There are no other labels that go with it. He is 90% non-verbal. He has some words he just started using in the past couple of months. He is 5. He screams a lot. Especially while we are driving. He also runs away from us and has no concept of danger. He isn't fully potty trained. He will pee in the toilet, but won't do much else in there. I clean poop out of the carpet a lot. I'm tired of cleaning poop out of the carpet :( It is very hard for me to relate to moms with aspies or higher functioning children. My child is totally different. Not to say moms of higher functioning kids don't experience the same emotions I do, but our life is just different, know what I mean? So while their child may be having a hard time with social interactions, my son is having a hard time not screaming when another child is near him. So we can find some common ground and comradery, but is is hard to share advice.



Rosebud27aj
by Amanda on May. 2, 2013 at 7:03 AM

My 2 boys are so different. 1 has high functioning autism and 1 has very low functioning autism...both classic autism, but they have their differences...

SunshineBird
by on May. 2, 2013 at 7:31 AM

It's so strange how broad the effects of autism are. My son (he will be 3 in 2 weeks) was diagnosed with classic autism. His sensory issues are not bad and doesn't need OT with his motor skills being normal for his age. He is becoming more and more verbal with all of his therapy. We've had major breakthroughs this last week or two where he is asking for things in full sentences! HUGE deal around here! Lol. He is working on making better eye contact and doing very well. His hang-ups are transitioning, socializing and stimming. When he is in the middle of a favorite stim and you ask him to do something else he gets very upset. He still spends much of his time "in his own world" but is doing really great with attending to his therapies. He has made tons of progress since December when we were first getting EI. Food, I think, will always be a battle with him along with his gut issues. We are just starting "potty training readiness" and have a ways to go before he is really ready. 

RJsMummy
by on May. 2, 2013 at 9:09 AM

Then basically, regardless of one's diagnosis, your symptoms can be anything. What the person struggles with most can be the same as someone else that has a different diagnosis OR two people with the same diagnosis can behave completely different?

Then, again I am really new to all of this so bare with me but, how do they even conclude that there was a "spectrum" of disorders? How is that the case when, to me, it appears that all of the symptoms, behaviours etc scatter from one person to the next, when not much seems set?

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