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Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

What do you wish people with "typically" developing kids could understand about your life parenting a child with autism?

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What do you wish people with "typically" developing kids could understand about your life parenting a child with autism?

by on Jun. 27, 2013 at 11:26 AM
Replies (11-20):
KatyTylersMom
by Silver Member on Jun. 27, 2013 at 8:47 PM
2 moms liked this

That there is a difference between pity and compassion.  I don't expect that anyone can really understand what it is to love and raise any special needs kid unless they have lived that same experience, but everyone can learn the difference between pity (puts them above the person as better than and sad for) and compassion (puts at equal level with the person, with a desire to understand and be a part of the situation). 

iamtryingforme
by Member on Jun. 27, 2013 at 9:33 PM
2 moms liked this

My dd is a child no matter what. She deserves to have friends, play dates, birthday invites what every. She has feelings. She may be an emotional roller coaster at all times (she has 7 diagnoses plus Autism), but she still deserves to be a child.

maciymommieof3
by on Jun. 27, 2013 at 9:35 PM

don't care what they understand about "my life parenting" just want them to understand and be understandable to "Autism Awareness"

maciymommieof3
by on Jun. 27, 2013 at 9:36 PM
2 moms liked this

Oh, I guess I would want them TO KNOW that I was lucky and choosen to have my kids....God does not give us something we can't handle....maybe challenge's...but that is good for us.

maciymommieof3
by on Jun. 27, 2013 at 9:36 PM

clapping

Quoting iamtryingforme:

My dd is a child no matter what. She deserves to have friends, play dates, birthday invites what every. She has feelings. She may be an emotional roller coaster at all times (she has 7 diagnoses plus Autism), but she still deserves to be a child.


maciymommieof3
by on Jun. 27, 2013 at 9:37 PM

blowing kissesQuoting kajira:


No. I would wish for more acceptance for being "different" though with out treating people, or children, like social lepers.


bakelady
by New Member on Jun. 27, 2013 at 10:59 PM
2 moms liked this
I wish others could understand how it feels to have total strangers stare, judge, make assumptions, roll their eyes, shake their heads and even shy away from us. I wish they would understand we just want to be accepted, loved, and respected.
terpmama
by on Jun. 27, 2013 at 11:24 PM

Can I ask a follow up question? I've worked with sn kids (mental health with abuse histories in a residential facility - I know not the same as a parent but I don't have any issues with including and supporting sn parents/kids)... My oldest is 4.5 now and really hitting the blunt age. For the most part physical differences (downs, wheelchair...) don't throw him much (cousin has downs and other family in wheel chairs so its "normal" and at most we hear "she looks like cousin Karen" or "he's got wheels like mamaws") but we're starting to hear the "what's wrong with him" type questions when its a behavioral difference (meltdowns, palsy...). What would you like to hear a parent answer? Knowing the child is not trying to be hurtful in the question and said in a purely curious tone and affect. 

I tend to go with something along the lines of, "looks like that person is having a hard time with something and is feeling frustrated" (for a meltdown) . Or "sometimes people can't control their hands well and they shake, but they're ok, it's just who they are" (for palsy types as he seems concerned that they may be hurt). Are these ok or is there a better way to phrase that?





SnortysMom
by Cathleen on Jun. 28, 2013 at 3:11 AM
1 mom liked this

That they are not "just being a brat" or "out of control". They might be overstimulated and having a difficult time adjusting to their surroundings. 


dani.0809
by on Jun. 28, 2013 at 5:02 AM
I think all parents need to understand, its no race children develop at different speeds whether on the spectrum or not! Don't push them and don't knock other oarents bc after all you never know someone's story! For example My son (3) has always known his name when ge was called but when asked his name or we pretend introduce ourselves he said hes mommy or daddy but recently i became overly excited bc he learned his name and i had someone say in a crappy tone "he's 3 and didn't know his name?) anywho just saying parents stop being so quick to judge everyone else's kids #ventofthenight
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