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Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

What was your experience with school district evaluation?

Posted by on Sep. 23, 2013 at 7:38 PM
  • 28 Replies

I don't have a diagnosis, but my son (32 months old) has speech delay cause of which we took him to early intervention 3 months back.The speech pathologist there said there are red flags for autism and that he was 12 months developmentally behind his age. His gross motor skills though were said to be advanced for his age. When I told her he has a good memory(though he spoke less than 40 words at 29 months), she didnt agree and scored him at 18 months congitive level. He is not the kind of kid who will co-operate during evaluations. Since then he has been in intensive therapy and I too started to teach him.He now speaks in 2-3 word phrases. He has learnt upper-case, lower-case letters and also phonics that go with each alphabet. He also recognizes numbers, colors, animals, etc. I feel he has a great memory and is able to recall things done 1-2 months before and memorizes things fast. He hears planes long before I can hear them. He also gets distracted and overstimulated easily.  He will say "no" to almost everything you suggest. He behaves very well with his aba therapist. If I try to make him do the things she does, he wont listen. When angry with his aba therapist, he comes running to me. When angry, he will try to hit me but will never attempt that on his therapists.His behavior is different whenever an unknown person is present like when a senior therapist visits our home, his attention span is much lower than what it is with his aba therapist. When overstimulated he runs in circles, walks on tip toes, spins, etc.This happens when he has a playmate at home or when we start the vacuum. I find him chewing on his jacket in crowded areas. He has a lot of interest in other kids and imitates them. He needs a little push to start playing like I make him throw the ball to the other kid and then he does it. He has learnt turn taking. He is very selective about food and I feed him all meals. Left on his own, I doubt he will eat anything at all. I dont know how much developmental delay he has as of today. I have a meeting with the school district next week. Can anybody please give me some insight on the evaluation process?What should I expect? What kind of preschool would be appropriate for him? What will happen if I don't agree with their evaluation? Is home schooling the only option if I dont agree with them? Medical evaluation is in Feb and I am  not sure what his daignosis will be, but the school district will evaluate him first.

by on Sep. 23, 2013 at 7:38 PM
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Replies (1-10):
MamaLauri
by Bronze Member on Sep. 23, 2013 at 8:11 PM

Evaluations can vary greatly depending on state. Come with your own questions. Know your rights under IDEA and under your state.

Are there people labeled with Autism, Aspergers, ADHD, ADD, dyslexia, gifted (they have common aspects within their brain architecture), gluten or casien sensitivies in the family? If the answer is no, then once neuroimmunity issues are ruled out, he is more likely to out grow many of these issues.  

He does sound very intelligent under his own terms, but sounds like he would benefit from multi-sensory integration activities.

He needs to understand hitting you or others is not to be tolerated. He already understands this with his therapist. 

Good luck.

TheJerseyGirl
by Michele on Sep. 23, 2013 at 8:19 PM

 Welcome!!!

Its hard to say how successful your school evaluation would be, as all states and districts are so different! Some of us are extremely thrilled with the services our children get, while others want to scream in frustration.

I will say that he has many markers for autism as my son did...the overstimulation, the spinning, toe walking, etc. One thing is for sure...you will feel more reassured with what the doctor's find as opposed to the school. They aren't experts and are also looking out for their own best interests. They just don't want to offer anything more than what they already have to offer.

Our school Child Study Team actually came to my house to evaluate him. They each did testing as far as social, academic, PT/OT , and academic. Then they will have a meeting where they will tell you their findings and what they suggest/offer for your son. You can object and wait for your's doctor's findings, but hopefully things will turn out well with the school! You can disagree with them and remember, YOU are also considered a member of the team and your voice is to be heard! Don't be afraid to speak up and let them know what your wishes are for your son. I also go into meetings with info found on the internet, a copy of my state's special education laws with areas of concern highlighted, and notes on things I really want to say!

 

 

Simran81
by Bronze Member on Sep. 23, 2013 at 10:14 PM


Thanks ill read that.

I come from a developing country and all these labels are not common there. My husband is on the brighter side, has food sensitivities like my son and also some odd habits like biting nails, is obsessed with keeping the house in order and my son too does the same, keeps everything right in place. I know me son needs help but i also want them to see his strengths and help him progress. I dont know how exactly this will happen. 

Quoting MamaLauri:

Evaluations can vary greatly depending on state. Come with your own questions. Know your rights under IDEA and under your state.

Are there people labeled with Autism, Aspergers, ADHD, ADD, dyslexia, gifted (they have common aspects within their brain architecture), gluten or casien sensitivies in the family? If the answer is no, then once neuroimmunity issues are ruled out, he is more likely to out grow many of these issues.  

He does sound very intelligent under his own terms, but sounds like he would benefit from multi-sensory integration activities.

He needs to understand hitting you or others is not to be tolerated. He already understands this with his therapist. 

Good luck.



Simran81
by Bronze Member on Sep. 23, 2013 at 10:20 PM


Thank you so much. I hope it works well. I want him to get the help to cope and also to have activities that will challenge him, which will be tricky. I know he wont adjust in a normal class with 20+ students. Yes, he has many markers and thats why i am looking for support here.

Quoting TheJerseyGirl:

 Welcome!!!

Its hard to say how successful your school evaluation would be, as all states and districts are so different! Some of us are extremely thrilled with the services our children get, while others want to scream in frustration.

I will say that he has many markers for autism as my son did...the overstimulation, the spinning, toe walking, etc. One thing is for sure...you will feel more reassured with what the doctor's find as opposed to the school. They aren't experts and are also looking out for their own best interests. They just don't want to offer anything more than what they already have to offer.

Our school Child Study Team actually came to my house to evaluate him. They each did testing as far as social, academic, PT/OT , and academic. Then they will have a meeting where they will tell you their findings and what they suggest/offer for your son. You can object and wait for your's doctor's findings, but hopefully things will turn out well with the school! You can disagree with them and remember, YOU are also considered a member of the team and your voice is to be heard! Don't be afraid to speak up and let them know what your wishes are for your son. I also go into meetings with info found on the internet, a copy of my state's special education laws with areas of concern highlighted, and notes on things I really want to say!

 

 



KatyTylersMom
by on Sep. 24, 2013 at 12:59 AM

So every school district, even in the same state and neighboring counties, will have a different evaluation process.  I know how my kids (both in pre-k at the moment) were evaluated and yet my friend whose daughters are 3.5 are receiving a completely different evaluation program at their school about 30 minutes away from where I live. 

My best advice is this: with the school your goal is not diagnosis, your goal is an outline of his abilities and areas of struggle and a plan to address his weaknesses by using his strengths.  So they will likely do their own speech evaluation - feel free to tell them he's been tested before and with which tests (PLS-5 for example) but don't give them a copy of any prior evaluations until after they have completed their own - I just prefer this because they go in with no preconceived notions of his capabilities and will push him as far as he's capable of going. 

They'll likely do some IQ testing with the school psychologist - even if he's completely non-verbal there ARE tests they can do that require no spoken instructions and no verbal replies from him so since you'll likely be present during all of this testing, if you feel like the test is not a good fit for him, ask for another test that plays more to his strengths so they can get the best idea of his capabilities.  If he does best with verbal prompts then he shouldn't be given the non-verbal test etc. Or if he needs YOU to ask him every single question instead of the school psychologist b/c he's not comfortable with new people, then DO that rather than force him to continue in an uncomfortable situation. 

They will probably either want him to do an in-class evaluation or observe him in a classroom or group setting either at daycare, home with other kids, or private preschool.  Our pre-k program has a 3 week in-class period there AT the school itself but many do not.  So pick a place and group where you know he'll be comfortable but still challenged.  You want the person doing the observation to see him both at his best and worst in an environment that resembles what he might be doing at school. 

Finally, when all the testing and observations are done you should receive a copy of all their reports and the preliminary IEP documents AT LEAST a day before your meeting so you have plenty of time to read through it all, see if their findings match your feelings on how he performed and what he's currently capable of doing, and so you can make notes on what goals YOU feel are important for him to have at school, not just what THEY feel he needs.  There are some great books on how to write/create measurable, well defined IEP goals and those books are worth a read as they also generally will describe the IEP process.  I read "Writing Measurable IEP goals and Objectives" by Bateman & Cynthia but I also like the book "800+ Measurable IEP goals and Objectives" by Chris Feyter.  Sometimes it's just SO much easier to see examples of great IEP goals and objectives when trying to create ones for your own kiddo. 

So then you're at the meeting, they go over all their tests and evaluations, they then say if he meets the criteria for early-intervention special ed preschool.  Most will have several levels of special ed hopefully including some general ed classes as well to have "normal" age-matched peers around him for lunches and play times.  Mostly my experience has been this - the first level of special ed is like normal preschool except the classes are kept much smaller (8-15 kids max with 1-2 teachers and at least as many classroom aides) and the focus is all on language, communication, social skills, making friends, how to be a good friend, how to behave well in a classroom setting, and then finally dead last on things like ABCs and colors and "preschool curriculum stuff".  My 4.5 year old daughter is in such a class, loves it, is doing very well and she goes 3 hours a day 4 days a week. 

The second level (which my 3 year old son is in now) is at most a 2 kids per teacher ratio with several aides in the room as well plus a speech therapist every other day and is more focused on developing ANY AND ALL language skills (so for much less verbal kiddos), self-care skills like potty training, washing hands, eating their own lunches, etc. and play skills.  My son goes 4 days a week and has 3 hours of "academic" school where they do pre-k type work with again the focus being all on getting him to use his words to communicate, interact well with adults and kids, follow directions, etc. and then 2 additional hours of play-skills where they will literally teach him "here is a doll house, here is how you play with it" and try to teach pretend play skills, social interactions, and again language language language all the time. 

Then the third level is pretty much (from what I understand, I only have the two kids!) 1:1 ABA style instruction for kids who just cannot handle the distractions and presence of other kids in a classroom setting. 

Ok, hope this helps!  If you have any questions I can answer please ask away.  I'm happy to give examples of my kiddo's IEP goals if you're interested - I can always dig out their paperwork:)



HippoCat
by Hadley on Sep. 24, 2013 at 1:27 AM


It seemed like to me they are not really looking for the child's strengths during the evaluation. They are more looking for things that are "off" or certain characteristics of Autism. I wanted them to see my son's strengths too so I wrote up my own evaluation of him and gave it to them. The evaluation team was thankful and then I felt like my perspective was seen. I also gave my evaluation to the team that started working with my son.

I find the evaluations really hard and painful because they are looking at your child under a microscope and it just seems unfair to me. However, they are necessary to get the services. The team that ends up working with your son will probably focus more on his strengths because they try to utilize these strengths to help him learn more. 

Quoting Simran81:


Thanks ill read that.

I come from a developing country and all these labels are not common there. My husband is on the brighter side, has food sensitivities like my son and also some odd habits like biting nails, is obsessed with keeping the house in order and my son too does the same, keeps everything right in place. I know me son needs help but i also want them to see his strengths and help him progress. I dont know how exactly this will happen. 

Quoting MamaLauri:

Evaluations can vary greatly depending on state. Come with your own questions. Know your rights under IDEA and under your state.

Are there people labeled with Autism, Aspergers, ADHD, ADD, dyslexia, gifted (they have common aspects within their brain architecture), gluten or casien sensitivies in the family? If the answer is no, then once neuroimmunity issues are ruled out, he is more likely to out grow many of these issues.  

He does sound very intelligent under his own terms, but sounds like he would benefit from multi-sensory integration activities.

He needs to understand hitting you or others is not to be tolerated. He already understands this with his therapist. 

Good luck.





Stephanie88B
by on Sep. 24, 2013 at 2:08 AM


omg lol i wish i could shrink you and put you in my pocket and refer to you when i dont know what to do. your amazing.  Do you think they will offer pre k to my son he is 27 months? is he too young?  my appts wed this week

Quoting KatyTylersMom:

So every school district, even in the same state and neighboring counties, will have a different evaluation process.  I know how my kids (both in pre-k at the moment) were evaluated and yet my friend whose daughters are 3.5 are receiving a completely different evaluation program at their school about 30 minutes away from where I live. 

My best advice is this: with the school your goal is not diagnosis, your goal is an outline of his abilities and areas of struggle and a plan to address his weaknesses by using his strengths.  So they will likely do their own speech evaluation - feel free to tell them he's been tested before and with which tests (PLS-5 for example) but don't give them a copy of any prior evaluations until after they have completed their own - I just prefer this because they go in with no preconceived notions of his capabilities and will push him as far as he's capable of going. 

They'll likely do some IQ testing with the school psychologist - even if he's completely non-verbal there ARE tests they can do that require no spoken instructions and no verbal replies from him so since you'll likely be present during all of this testing, if you feel like the test is not a good fit for him, ask for another test that plays more to his strengths so they can get the best idea of his capabilities.  If he does best with verbal prompts then he shouldn't be given the non-verbal test etc. Or if he needs YOU to ask him every single question instead of the school psychologist b/c he's not comfortable with new people, then DO that rather than force him to continue in an uncomfortable situation. 

They will probably either want him to do an in-class evaluation or observe him in a classroom or group setting either at daycare, home with other kids, or private preschool.  Our pre-k program has a 3 week in-class period there AT the school itself but many do not.  So pick a place and group where you know he'll be comfortable but still challenged.  You want the person doing the observation to see him both at his best and worst in an environment that resembles what he might be doing at school. 

Finally, when all the testing and observations are done you should receive a copy of all their reports and the preliminary IEP documents AT LEAST a day before your meeting so you have plenty of time to read through it all, see if their findings match your feelings on how he performed and what he's currently capable of doing, and so you can make notes on what goals YOU feel are important for him to have at school, not just what THEY feel he needs.  There are some great books on how to write/create measurable, well defined IEP goals and those books are worth a read as they also generally will describe the IEP process.  I read "Writing Measurable IEP goals and Objectives" by Bateman & Cynthia but I also like the book "800+ Measurable IEP goals and Objectives" by Chris Feyter.  Sometimes it's just SO much easier to see examples of great IEP goals and objectives when trying to create ones for your own kiddo. 

So then you're at the meeting, they go over all their tests and evaluations, they then say if he meets the criteria for early-intervention special ed preschool.  Most will have several levels of special ed hopefully including some general ed classes as well to have "normal" age-matched peers around him for lunches and play times.  Mostly my experience has been this - the first level of special ed is like normal preschool except the classes are kept much smaller (8-15 kids max with 1-2 teachers and at least as many classroom aides) and the focus is all on language, communication, social skills, making friends, how to be a good friend, how to behave well in a classroom setting, and then finally dead last on things like ABCs and colors and "preschool curriculum stuff".  My 4.5 year old daughter is in such a class, loves it, is doing very well and she goes 3 hours a day 4 days a week. 

The second level (which my 3 year old son is in now) is at most a 2 kids per teacher ratio with several aides in the room as well plus a speech therapist every other day and is more focused on developing ANY AND ALL language skills (so for much less verbal kiddos), self-care skills like potty training, washing hands, eating their own lunches, etc. and play skills.  My son goes 4 days a week and has 3 hours of "academic" school where they do pre-k type work with again the focus being all on getting him to use his words to communicate, interact well with adults and kids, follow directions, etc. and then 2 additional hours of play-skills where they will literally teach him "here is a doll house, here is how you play with it" and try to teach pretend play skills, social interactions, and again language language language all the time. 

Then the third level is pretty much (from what I understand, I only have the two kids!) 1:1 ABA style instruction for kids who just cannot handle the distractions and presence of other kids in a classroom setting. 

Ok, hope this helps!  If you have any questions I can answer please ask away.  I'm happy to give examples of my kiddo's IEP goals if you're interested - I can always dig out their paperwork:)





KatyTylersMom
by on Sep. 24, 2013 at 2:38 AM

Here they would offer speech therapy at less than 3 years of age but you can't start pre-k until your third birthday.  So right now there are two kids in my sons class because of no one having birthdays in September and October apparently but they're expecting 3 more kids by Xmas as they turn 3.  Not sure if they'd offer ABA at younger ages through the school system or not, we have a state agency called Regional Center here in CA which covers ABA, speech, OT and PT (only if your own insurance doesn't offer coverage) for all kids 0-3 years old.  So the school system isn't on the hook until they turn 3 except for kids like my daughter who was speech delayed enough to qualify for services through the schools at 2.5 years old but not thought to be delayed on other areas so she didn't qualify for services through Regional Center.  So she had an IEP for one 45 min speech therapy session per week for a year before we got her diagnosed with autism and forced the school to evaluate her for special education services which she qualified for and enjoys now.  

But if the school is evaluating him at 2 years old they must have some services they offer to kids his age or they'd simply tell you to come back at 3.  I will say this, if you ask for the moon, stars, and sun on a plate in terms of services the worst they can say is no.  It might be worth researching what programs, therapies, and in-home therapies are available in your county and it never hurts to ask firmly and with well defined reasons those services are necessary for your child's future scholastic success:) 

Quoting Stephanie88B:


omg lol i wish i could shrink you and put you in my pocket and refer to you when i dont know what to do. your amazing.  Do you think they will offer pre k to my son he is 27 months? is he too young?  my appts wed this week

Quoting KatyTylersMom:

So every school district, even in the same state and neighboring counties, will have a different evaluation process.  I know how my kids (both in pre-k at the moment) were evaluated and yet my friend whose daughters are 3.5 are receiving a completely different evaluation program at their school about 30 minutes away from where I live. 

My best advice is this: with the school your goal is not diagnosis, your goal is an outline of his abilities and areas of struggle and a plan to address his weaknesses by using his strengths.  So they will likely do their own speech evaluation - feel free to tell them he's been tested before and with which tests (PLS-5 for example) but don't give them a copy of any prior evaluations until after they have completed their own - I just prefer this because they go in with no preconceived notions of his capabilities and will push him as far as he's capable of going. 

They'll likely do some IQ testing with the school psychologist - even if he's completely non-verbal there ARE tests they can do that require no spoken instructions and no verbal replies from him so since you'll likely be present during all of this testing, if you feel like the test is not a good fit for him, ask for another test that plays more to his strengths so they can get the best idea of his capabilities.  If he does best with verbal prompts then he shouldn't be given the non-verbal test etc. Or if he needs YOU to ask him every single question instead of the school psychologist b/c he's not comfortable with new people, then DO that rather than force him to continue in an uncomfortable situation. 

They will probably either want him to do an in-class evaluation or observe him in a classroom or group setting either at daycare, home with other kids, or private preschool.  Our pre-k program has a 3 week in-class period there AT the school itself but many do not.  So pick a place and group where you know he'll be comfortable but still challenged.  You want the person doing the observation to see him both at his best and worst in an environment that resembles what he might be doing at school. 

Finally, when all the testing and observations are done you should receive a copy of all their reports and the preliminary IEP documents AT LEAST a day before your meeting so you have plenty of time to read through it all, see if their findings match your feelings on how he performed and what he's currently capable of doing, and so you can make notes on what goals YOU feel are important for him to have at school, not just what THEY feel he needs.  There are some great books on how to write/create measurable, well defined IEP goals and those books are worth a read as they also generally will describe the IEP process.  I read "Writing Measurable IEP goals and Objectives" by Bateman & Cynthia but I also like the book "800+ Measurable IEP goals and Objectives" by Chris Feyter.  Sometimes it's just SO much easier to see examples of great IEP goals and objectives when trying to create ones for your own kiddo. 

So then you're at the meeting, they go over all their tests and evaluations, they then say if he meets the criteria for early-intervention special ed preschool.  Most will have several levels of special ed hopefully including some general ed classes as well to have "normal" age-matched peers around him for lunches and play times.  Mostly my experience has been this - the first level of special ed is like normal preschool except the classes are kept much smaller (8-15 kids max with 1-2 teachers and at least as many classroom aides) and the focus is all on language, communication, social skills, making friends, how to be a good friend, how to behave well in a classroom setting, and then finally dead last on things like ABCs and colors and "preschool curriculum stuff".  My 4.5 year old daughter is in such a class, loves it, is doing very well and she goes 3 hours a day 4 days a week. 

The second level (which my 3 year old son is in now) is at most a 2 kids per teacher ratio with several aides in the room as well plus a speech therapist every other day and is more focused on developing ANY AND ALL language skills (so for much less verbal kiddos), self-care skills like potty training, washing hands, eating their own lunches, etc. and play skills.  My son goes 4 days a week and has 3 hours of "academic" school where they do pre-k type work with again the focus being all on getting him to use his words to communicate, interact well with adults and kids, follow directions, etc. and then 2 additional hours of play-skills where they will literally teach him "here is a doll house, here is how you play with it" and try to teach pretend play skills, social interactions, and again language language language all the time. 

Then the third level is pretty much (from what I understand, I only have the two kids!) 1:1 ABA style instruction for kids who just cannot handle the distractions and presence of other kids in a classroom setting. 

Ok, hope this helps!  If you have any questions I can answer please ask away.  I'm happy to give examples of my kiddo's IEP goals if you're interested - I can always dig out their paperwork:)







Stephanie88B
by on Sep. 24, 2013 at 3:10 AM


Nope, I am totally wrong... It is the regional center evaluating him.. I don't know why I keep calling it the school.  Sorry.  The San Andreas Regional center we are in Northern california, Santa clara to be exact.  He got his official diagnosis today and he is currently in speech 3 times a week we been paying out of pocket but are expecting a refund which our insurance is mailing us.  He was perscribed 5 aba days a week, continue the 3 speech thearpy sessions and have some OT.  Not sure what Regional will offer... my appointment on Wed

Quoting KatyTylersMom:

Here they would offer speech therapy at less than 3 years of age but you can't start pre-k until your third birthday.  So right now there are two kids in my sons class because of no one having birthdays in September and October apparently but they're expecting 3 more kids by Xmas as they turn 3.  Not sure if they'd offer ABA at younger ages through the school system or not, we have a state agency called Regional Center here in CA which covers ABA, speech, OT and PT (only if your own insurance doesn't offer coverage) for all kids 0-3 years old.  So the school system isn't on the hook until they turn 3 except for kids like my daughter who was speech delayed enough to qualify for services through the schools at 2.5 years old but not thought to be delayed on other areas so she didn't qualify for services through Regional Center.  So she had an IEP for one 45 min speech therapy session per week for a year before we got her diagnosed with autism and forced the school to evaluate her for special education services which she qualified for and enjoys now.  

But if the school is evaluating him at 2 years old they must have some services they offer to kids his age or they'd simply tell you to come back at 3.  I will say this, if you ask for the moon, stars, and sun on a plate in terms of services the worst they can say is no.  It might be worth researching what programs, therapies, and in-home therapies are available in your county and it never hurts to ask firmly and with well defined reasons those services are necessary for your child's future scholastic success:) 

Quoting Stephanie88B:


omg lol i wish i could shrink you and put you in my pocket and refer to you when i dont know what to do. your amazing.  Do you think they will offer pre k to my son he is 27 months? is he too young?  my appts wed this week

Quoting KatyTylersMom:

So every school district, even in the same state and neighboring counties, will have a different evaluation process.  I know how my kids (both in pre-k at the moment) were evaluated and yet my friend whose daughters are 3.5 are receiving a completely different evaluation program at their school about 30 minutes away from where I live. 

My best advice is this: with the school your goal is not diagnosis, your goal is an outline of his abilities and areas of struggle and a plan to address his weaknesses by using his strengths.  So they will likely do their own speech evaluation - feel free to tell them he's been tested before and with which tests (PLS-5 for example) but don't give them a copy of any prior evaluations until after they have completed their own - I just prefer this because they go in with no preconceived notions of his capabilities and will push him as far as he's capable of going. 

They'll likely do some IQ testing with the school psychologist - even if he's completely non-verbal there ARE tests they can do that require no spoken instructions and no verbal replies from him so since you'll likely be present during all of this testing, if you feel like the test is not a good fit for him, ask for another test that plays more to his strengths so they can get the best idea of his capabilities.  If he does best with verbal prompts then he shouldn't be given the non-verbal test etc. Or if he needs YOU to ask him every single question instead of the school psychologist b/c he's not comfortable with new people, then DO that rather than force him to continue in an uncomfortable situation. 

They will probably either want him to do an in-class evaluation or observe him in a classroom or group setting either at daycare, home with other kids, or private preschool.  Our pre-k program has a 3 week in-class period there AT the school itself but many do not.  So pick a place and group where you know he'll be comfortable but still challenged.  You want the person doing the observation to see him both at his best and worst in an environment that resembles what he might be doing at school. 

Finally, when all the testing and observations are done you should receive a copy of all their reports and the preliminary IEP documents AT LEAST a day before your meeting so you have plenty of time to read through it all, see if their findings match your feelings on how he performed and what he's currently capable of doing, and so you can make notes on what goals YOU feel are important for him to have at school, not just what THEY feel he needs.  There are some great books on how to write/create measurable, well defined IEP goals and those books are worth a read as they also generally will describe the IEP process.  I read "Writing Measurable IEP goals and Objectives" by Bateman & Cynthia but I also like the book "800+ Measurable IEP goals and Objectives" by Chris Feyter.  Sometimes it's just SO much easier to see examples of great IEP goals and objectives when trying to create ones for your own kiddo. 

So then you're at the meeting, they go over all their tests and evaluations, they then say if he meets the criteria for early-intervention special ed preschool.  Most will have several levels of special ed hopefully including some general ed classes as well to have "normal" age-matched peers around him for lunches and play times.  Mostly my experience has been this - the first level of special ed is like normal preschool except the classes are kept much smaller (8-15 kids max with 1-2 teachers and at least as many classroom aides) and the focus is all on language, communication, social skills, making friends, how to be a good friend, how to behave well in a classroom setting, and then finally dead last on things like ABCs and colors and "preschool curriculum stuff".  My 4.5 year old daughter is in such a class, loves it, is doing very well and she goes 3 hours a day 4 days a week. 

The second level (which my 3 year old son is in now) is at most a 2 kids per teacher ratio with several aides in the room as well plus a speech therapist every other day and is more focused on developing ANY AND ALL language skills (so for much less verbal kiddos), self-care skills like potty training, washing hands, eating their own lunches, etc. and play skills.  My son goes 4 days a week and has 3 hours of "academic" school where they do pre-k type work with again the focus being all on getting him to use his words to communicate, interact well with adults and kids, follow directions, etc. and then 2 additional hours of play-skills where they will literally teach him "here is a doll house, here is how you play with it" and try to teach pretend play skills, social interactions, and again language language language all the time. 

Then the third level is pretty much (from what I understand, I only have the two kids!) 1:1 ABA style instruction for kids who just cannot handle the distractions and presence of other kids in a classroom setting. 

Ok, hope this helps!  If you have any questions I can answer please ask away.  I'm happy to give examples of my kiddo's IEP goals if you're interested - I can always dig out their paperwork:)









Simran81
by Bronze Member on Sep. 24, 2013 at 3:25 AM

I totally agree with you and that is exactly what is making me nervous. It hurts me everytime my son has to be evaluated. He is just 2 and should be only playing around.He is being put through such a grind, with so many therapies and avaluations. I agree that it is for his benefit and but still I find the process painful. Thanks for the idea!


Quoting HippoCat:


It seemed like to me they are not really looking for the child's strengths during the evaluation. They are more looking for things that are "off" or certain characteristics of Autism. I wanted them to see my son's strengths too so I wrote up my own evaluation of him and gave it to them. The evaluation team was thankful and then I felt like my perspective was seen. I also gave my evaluation to the team that started working with my son.

I find the evaluations really hard and painful because they are looking at your child under a microscope and it just seems unfair to me. However, they are necessary to get the services. The team that ends up working with your son will probably focus more on his strengths because they try to utilize these strengths to help him learn more. 

Quoting Simran81:


Thanks ill read that.

I come from a developing country and all these labels are not common there. My husband is on the brighter side, has food sensitivities like my son and also some odd habits like biting nails, is obsessed with keeping the house in order and my son too does the same, keeps everything right in place. I know me son needs help but i also want them to see his strengths and help him progress. I dont know how exactly this will happen. 

Quoting MamaLauri:

Evaluations can vary greatly depending on state. Come with your own questions. Know your rights under IDEA and under your state.

Are there people labeled with Autism, Aspergers, ADHD, ADD, dyslexia, gifted (they have common aspects within their brain architecture), gluten or casien sensitivies in the family? If the answer is no, then once neuroimmunity issues are ruled out, he is more likely to out grow many of these issues.  

He does sound very intelligent under his own terms, but sounds like he would benefit from multi-sensory integration activities.

He needs to understand hitting you or others is not to be tolerated. He already understands this with his therapist. 

Good luck.







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