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Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

Our pets & Autism

Posted by on Oct. 13, 2013 at 8:37 AM
  • 35 Replies
We have a deaf aussie that we taught sign language, she is oh so hyper. She had pups & sat on one of them causing Maggie to have balance & coordination troubles. She can't stand walk run straight. Tha doesn't her from being a pup tho. My son does wonderful with them on some days,other days he's very indifferent to them. His therapist suggested having him care for one of them as his own. He's just not interested. Do any of you have pets that your kiddos care for? Any suggestions that may encourage him to care for ours?

aprilmaydawn

by on Oct. 13, 2013 at 8:37 AM
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SamMom912
by Gold Member on Oct. 13, 2013 at 9:00 AM
1 mom liked this

Empathy and compassion definetley does NOT run strong in our little ones. i agree with the therapist that caring for something MAY help that.. But Im thinking it will be a long and tough road. Lol... You are definetely going to have to remind hiim. You are definetely going to have to help.. And each time you help, I think it would be best to do it happily (not begrudgingly because its his job).but a reminder of how we all work together compassionately... So when he sasys he CANT walk the pup right now.. You could say.. "Humm. Im not sure the pup will wait. Im think he has to go out, Its ok... I can see that you need a hand here.. But I know I wouldnt want you to wait if you needed something important.. So I can walk the pup... " and just do it.. I think you can reinforce the caring and empathy by being caring and empathetic yourself. i think that may bridge the gap for him and perhaps lead to a great relationship with the dog (and you..and hopefully others). I think it you solely make this HIS responsibility.. Then he may grow resentful.

I think caring for other things CAN be a stretch for them. especially at such a young age (chronologically and developmentally) when they are still so egocentric. 

I had a little black lab pup for 8 years before Sam was born. She was my baby girl. Sam was not interested in her in the beginning, but there were few occasions that they played. SHE loved hide and seek... And she loved to chase him around for her toy.. She would run, she would chase.. All through the house with him giggling. 

But as he got older, she got older... She grew tired, played less. He would let her out in the yard or sometimes hold her leash.. But she was a calm, lazy ole girl by the time he was really interactive. We sent her to Rainbow Bridge this past January 4th. (Am crying). I miss her so much. Everyday I miss her. Im sooo not ready for a "replacement".. As NO ONE can replace her.. And I will be disappointed in another dog for not being her... Having her wonderful attitude and disposition.

we will get one someday when Im ready. 

mypbandj
by Jen on Oct. 13, 2013 at 9:47 AM
Maybe set up a picture chart with everything he needs to do daily: water, food, walk, cuddle.
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mypbandj
by Jen on Oct. 13, 2013 at 9:48 AM
Oh and we did get a dog for my son to be like a companion dog. He was not responsible for her care though. He just played with her.
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darbyakeep45
by Darby on Oct. 13, 2013 at 11:38 AM

Not sure...these ladies have some good thoughts though.  Hugs and good luck!

Koltie6
by on Oct. 13, 2013 at 1:26 PM
My son has a pony as part of hippo therapy. He feeds her and bathes her. We have many farm animals and he interacts with them all . It is amazing.
benny1031
by on Oct. 13, 2013 at 3:06 PM
We have two cats one just recently came on our door step a few days ago we put out flyers but sheis staying with us in the mean time. He just loves animals he is very good about feeding them.keep I trducing the puppy to him alittle each day and even if he shows no interest he will warm up to the idea of taking care of the puppy.
kajira
by Emma on Oct. 13, 2013 at 3:09 PM
3 moms liked this
I disagree with that.... I have a lot of compassion for animals, and animals are probably the only thing I have true empathy with, let alone the ability to read them... ^.^ Growing up, all I cared about was animals.... So I think such a big statement that autistic people lack compassion is a misnomer... we may not SHOW it like normal people, but it doesn't mean we don't FEEL it.
Quoting SamMom912:

Empathy and compassion definetley does NOT run strong in our little ones. i agree with the therapist that caring for something MAY help that.. But Im thinking it will be a long and tough road. Lol... You are definetely going to have to remind hiim. You are definetely going to have to help.. And each time you help, I think it would be best to do it happily (not begrudgingly because its his job).but a reminder of how we all work together compassionately... So when he sasys he CANT walk the pup right now.. You could say.. "Humm. Im not sure the pup will wait. Im think he has to go out, Its ok... I can see that you need a hand here.. But I know I wouldnt want you to wait if you needed something important.. So I can walk the pup... " and just do it.. I think you can reinforce the caring and empathy by being caring and empathetic yourself. i think that may bridge the gap for him and perhaps lead to a great relationship with the dog (and you..and hopefully others). I think it you solely make this HIS responsibility.. Then he may grow resentful.

I think caring for other things CAN be a stretch for them. especially at such a young age (chronologically and developmentally) when they are still so egocentric. 

I had a little black lab pup for 8 years before Sam was born. She was my baby girl. Sam was not interested in her in the beginning, but there were few occasions that they played. SHE loved hide and seek... And she loved to chase him around for her toy.. She would run, she would chase.. All through the house with him giggling. 

But as he got older, she got older... She grew tired, played less. He would let her out in the yard or sometimes hold her leash.. But she was a calm, lazy ole girl by the time he was really interactive. We sent her to Rainbow Bridge this past January 4th. (Am crying). I miss her so much. Everyday I miss her. Im sooo not ready for a "replacement".. As NO ONE can replace her.. And I will be disappointed in another dog for not being her... Having her wonderful attitude and disposition.

we will get one someday when Im ready. 

kajira
by Emma on Oct. 13, 2013 at 3:11 PM
3 moms liked this
For what it's worth, I think an interest in animals is going to be unique to the person, just like a NT person. I have some autistic friends who are just as animal obsessed as I am, where-as I know plenty who are very ANTI-animals. It really depends on the person.
SamMom912
by Gold Member on Oct. 13, 2013 at 3:12 PM
Was that something as a child? Or something you grew into?
Empathy and compassion isnt common in ASD kids/adults. Would you agree that you were part of a small caring population?


Quoting kajira:

I disagree with that.... I have a lot of compassion for animals, and animals are probably the only thing I have true empathy with, let alone the ability to read them... ^.^ Growing up, all I cared about was animals.... So I think such a big statement that autistic people lack compassion is a misnomer... we may not SHOW it like normal people, but it doesn't mean we don't FEEL it.
Quoting SamMom912:

Empathy and compassion definetley does NOT run strong in our little ones. i agree with the therapist that caring for something MAY help that.. But Im thinking it will be a long and tough road. Lol... You are definetely going to have to remind hiim. You are definetely going to have to help.. And each time you help, I think it would be best to do it happily (not begrudgingly because its his job).but a reminder of how we all work together compassionately... So when he sasys he CANT walk the pup right now.. You could say.. "Humm. Im not sure the pup will wait. Im think he has to go out, Its ok... I can see that you need a hand here.. But I know I wouldnt want you to wait if you needed something important.. So I can walk the pup... " and just do it.. I think you can reinforce the caring and empathy by being caring and empathetic yourself. i think that may bridge the gap for him and perhaps lead to a great relationship with the dog (and you..and hopefully others). I think it you solely make this HIS responsibility.. Then he may grow resentful.

I think caring for other things CAN be a stretch for them. especially at such a young age (chronologically and developmentally) when they are still so egocentric. 

I had a little black lab pup for 8 years before Sam was born. She was my baby girl. Sam was not interested in her in the beginning, but there were few occasions that they played. SHE loved hide and seek... And she loved to chase him around for her toy.. She would run, she would chase.. All through the house with him giggling. 

But as he got older, she got older... She grew tired, played less. He would let her out in the yard or sometimes hold her leash.. But she was a calm, lazy ole girl by the time he was really interactive. We sent her to Rainbow Bridge this past January 4th. (Am crying). I miss her so much. Everyday I miss her. Im sooo not ready for a "replacement".. As NO ONE can replace her.. And I will be disappointed in another dog for not being her... Having her wonderful attitude and disposition.

we will get one someday when Im ready. 


kajira
by Emma on Oct. 13, 2013 at 3:22 PM

I've always had a natural affinity with animals. More so than people. I prefer animals over people and I always have. I like animals, where-as I dislike most people and that's been that way since I was a tiny child.

I don't have much empathy when it comes to humans, or even empathy in the sense that I "feel" what the other person feels. I do have a lot of compassion and a lot of logical understanding. If someone feels sad, I don't feel sad with them, but I acknowledge and logically understand why they feel that way, or ask them to explain it to me so I can understand.... the latter came with age, experience, and practice and actually WANTING to relate to the people I cared about.

I cared - I just had to learn a more effective communication method with humans.... I think most humans are aliens... where-as animals are much simpler in both their emotions and their reasons/logic for doing things and their body language is easier to read.

Compassion can be very common amonst ASD people, I don't know many ASD adults who lack compassion, again, the expression of it may not always come out correctly, but most ASD adults are very passionate, and usually care too much about those they are involved with, rather than a lack of compassion.

And no, I would not agree that I am a small part of caring people, most ASD people I know are very caring individuals, again, they just may not always SHOW it in traditional methods.

Quoting SamMom912:

Was that something as a child? Or something you grew into?
Empathy and compassion isnt common in ASD kids/adults. Would you agree that you were part of a small caring population?



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