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zero imagination to overactive?

Posted by on Oct. 23, 2013 at 6:32 PM
  • 11 Replies
My 3 yr old had no imaginative play until a few months ago. Now all the sudden its overactive! What happened? He's making up stuff that's just impossible. Like a snowball fight in his jumpolene. He doesn't even know what snow feels like!!
by on Oct. 23, 2013 at 6:32 PM
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Replies (1-10):
jconney80
by Bronze Member on Oct. 24, 2013 at 12:35 AM
1 mom liked this

My son's imagination is very hyperactive! I'm pretty sure he spends most of his day stuck in it!

Jenibob
by Bronze Member on Oct. 24, 2013 at 11:56 AM

He must have learned about it somewhere!   What other imaginative play does he do?  My 11 year old could not do imaginative play until a couple years ago.  

EthansMomma2010
by Bronze Member on Oct. 24, 2013 at 11:58 AM
He uses blocks as train tracks. His obsession has been snow though. I know there is more buy I'm blanking. Lol. Oh he will play in the kitchen at school and pretend to make cupcakes.

Quoting Jenibob:

He must have learned about it somewhere!   What other imaginative play does he do?  My 11 year old could not do imaginative play until a couple years ago.  

kajira
by Emma on Oct. 24, 2013 at 12:46 PM

My son has *always* had an active over-imagination when it comes to imaginary play... or so it seemed on the surface.

In his case, he actually has a psychotic disorder and his imagination play on the surface was fairly real to him. like he was actually talking/seeing/hearing things and interacting with them. And if he "plays pretend" long enough, the thing becomes real to him... and he also obsesses about it once he learns how to mimic or pretend play something new. Like making cup cakes with his sisters kitchen toy, hed never do "that" on his own, but she can get him to do it..... but he can't go outside of pretending one thing. And it has to be the same way every single time. And we still have a lot of behavioral issues surrounding that kind of play, despite being able to pretend play at the kitchen toy.

I still lack functional imagination as an autistic adult. Like I can kind of pretend play with making fake voices and saying dumb stuff while holding a doll and it took me YEARS of practice and mimicking how my daughter and my husband did imaginary play to figure out how to do that so I could play with them.

I still lack the ability to functionally imagination how something would be or look like, or change with out any kind of previous experience, or talking about it so much and thinking about it so much I finally can sort the pieces out to come up with SOMETHING. Usually, I just have to aks my husband to paint me a picture so I have something to work off of. (And I don't mean literally paint me a picture, I just mean give me examples and ideas until I have something more concrete to work with.)


JTMOM422
by Brenda on Oct. 24, 2013 at 12:55 PM
1 mom liked this

That is so cute. I love hearing this. Sounds like he is picking up on things even though you may not know it. Maybe he saw it on a cartoon or a tv show

EthansMomma2010
by Bronze Member on Oct. 24, 2013 at 3:05 PM
I feel like that might be him as well. It kinda came out of the blue. But he languageis so bbehindits hard to tell wwhat's always been there and what hasn't. The snow play I really think he thinks is real.

Quoting kajira:

My son has *always* had an active over-imagination when it comes to imaginary play... or so it seemed on the surface.

In his case, he actually has a psychotic disorder and his imagination play on the surface was fairly real to him. like he was actually talking/seeing/hearing things and interacting with them. And if he "plays pretend" long enough, the thing becomes real to him... and he also obsesses about it once he learns how to mimic or pretend play something new. Like making cup cakes with his sisters kitchen toy, hed never do "that" on his own, but she can get him to do it..... but he can't go outside of pretending one thing. And it has to be the same way every single time. And we still have a lot of behavioral issues surrounding that kind of play, despite being able to pretend play at the kitchen toy.

I still lack functional imagination as an autistic adult. Like I can kind of pretend play with making fake voices and saying dumb stuff while holding a doll and it took me YEARS of practice and mimicking how my daughter and my husband did imaginary play to figure out how to do that so I could play with them.

I still lack the ability to functionally imagination how something would be or look like, or change with out any kind of previous experience, or talking about it so much and thinking about it so much I finally can sort the pieces out to come up with SOMETHING. Usually, I just have to aks my husband to paint me a picture so I have something to work off of. (And I don't mean literally paint me a picture, I just mean give me examples and ideas until I have something more concrete to work with.)


LIMom1105
by Silver Member on Oct. 24, 2013 at 3:08 PM

 My son was like this. He did nothing in terms of imaginative play until he was about 4. I was working on this with him (using my own modified version of Floortime), but what really made it click for him (IMO) was watching Toy Story. At first he copied scenarios out of that movie or other things he watched, but eventually these scenarios became more and more imaginative.

kajira
by Emma on Oct. 24, 2013 at 3:11 PM

If you're worried, just keep a log on some of the behaviors or weird quirks. His doctors should be able to figure out if it's a phase, or a good sign, or him not actually pretending and figuring out if something is a sign of something else.

I wouldn't assume the worst, or even think much of it until you keep track of some stuff for a while. It's so hard to know, especially if their language is delayed.

One of the key differences is my son had normal language development, and when his mental illness signs started around 4 - his language has regressed the older he's gotten, and he talks worse now, than he did at 4.

There was a direct link to his language, and his mental health symptoms, when before, he was developing normal for his milestones.

Quoting EthansMomma2010:

I feel like that might be him as well. It kinda came out of the blue. But he languageis so bbehindits hard to tell wwhat's always been there and what hasn't. The snow play I really think he thinks is real.

Quoting kajira:

My son has *always* had an active over-imagination when it comes to imaginary play... or so it seemed on the surface.

In his case, he actually has a psychotic disorder and his imagination play on the surface was fairly real to him. like he was actually talking/seeing/hearing things and interacting with them. And if he "plays pretend" long enough, the thing becomes real to him... and he also obsesses about it once he learns how to mimic or pretend play something new. Like making cup cakes with his sisters kitchen toy, hed never do "that" on his own, but she can get him to do it..... but he can't go outside of pretending one thing. And it has to be the same way every single time. And we still have a lot of behavioral issues surrounding that kind of play, despite being able to pretend play at the kitchen toy.

I still lack functional imagination as an autistic adult. Like I can kind of pretend play with making fake voices and saying dumb stuff while holding a doll and it took me YEARS of practice and mimicking how my daughter and my husband did imaginary play to figure out how to do that so I could play with them.

I still lack the ability to functionally imagination how something would be or look like, or change with out any kind of previous experience, or talking about it so much and thinking about it so much I finally can sort the pieces out to come up with SOMETHING. Usually, I just have to aks my husband to paint me a picture so I have something to work off of. (And I don't mean literally paint me a picture, I just mean give me examples and ideas until I have something more concrete to work with.)



darbyakeep45
by Darby on Oct. 24, 2013 at 4:40 PM

Not sure mama...hugs!

EthansMomma2010
by Bronze Member on Oct. 24, 2013 at 5:15 PM
Thanks. I will try to keep track. I need a voice recorder for all the crap I have to keep track of.

Quoting kajira:

If you're worried, just keep a log on some of the behaviors or weird quirks. His doctors should be able to figure out if it's a phase, or a good sign, or him not actually pretending and figuring out if something is a sign of something else.

I wouldn't assume the worst, or even think much of it until you keep track of some stuff for a while. It's so hard to know, especially if their language is delayed.

One of the key differences is my son had normal language development, and when his mental illness signs started around 4 - his language has regressed the older he's gotten, and he talks worse now, than he did at 4.

There was a direct link to his language, and his mental health symptoms, when before, he was developing normal for his milestones.

Quoting EthansMomma2010:

I feel like that might be him as well. It kinda came out of the blue. But he languageis so bbehindits hard to tell wwhat's always been there and what hasn't. The snow play I really think he thinks is real.



Quoting kajira:

My son has *always* had an active over-imagination when it comes to imaginary play... or so it seemed on the surface.

In his case, he actually has a psychotic disorder and his imagination play on the surface was fairly real to him. like he was actually talking/seeing/hearing things and interacting with them. And if he "plays pretend" long enough, the thing becomes real to him... and he also obsesses about it once he learns how to mimic or pretend play something new. Like making cup cakes with his sisters kitchen toy, hed never do "that" on his own, but she can get him to do it..... but he can't go outside of pretending one thing. And it has to be the same way every single time. And we still have a lot of behavioral issues surrounding that kind of play, despite being able to pretend play at the kitchen toy.

I still lack functional imagination as an autistic adult. Like I can kind of pretend play with making fake voices and saying dumb stuff while holding a doll and it took me YEARS of practice and mimicking how my daughter and my husband did imaginary play to figure out how to do that so I could play with them.

I still lack the ability to functionally imagination how something would be or look like, or change with out any kind of previous experience, or talking about it so much and thinking about it so much I finally can sort the pieces out to come up with SOMETHING. Usually, I just have to aks my husband to paint me a picture so I have something to work off of. (And I don't mean literally paint me a picture, I just mean give me examples and ideas until I have something more concrete to work with.)



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