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Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

Is a person with autism "disabled"?

Posted by on Apr. 18, 2014 at 1:11 PM
Amy
  • 36 Replies

Why or why not?  Please share your thoughts.

by on Apr. 18, 2014 at 1:11 PM
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Replies (1-10):
ineedcoffeemom
by Brittaney on Apr. 18, 2014 at 1:36 PM
2 moms liked this

I have a feeling this word is offensive to some people. Just because "disabled" brings to mind many negative things for people. Personally, I do think the description fits my daughter. She IS unable to do many things people her same age can and are expected to do. But, with that said, just because she can't speak (no matter whether she is ever able to or not) doesn't mean she can't be a productive part of society .... she could learn to use an alternate communication device. The same goes for the other things she lacks ..... even if she never fits the norm, doesn't mean she can't be a part of the whole.

I think that's where some people might struggle with the word "disabled." They may think about all the things people CAN'T do when they have this label. But I don't think about it that way. I simply think it means there are some things my daughter will have to do in a different way..... but it doesn't mean she won't do them at all. Like a person in a wheelchair .... just because they can't walk with their feet doesn't mean they can't get from place to place, they just have to do it in a different way. And they may be limited to do things, but only because society makes it so ....... a wheelchair access can be added anywhere, it just takes time and money. I think the same goes for my daughter. Every obstacle can be overcome, sadly it just takes time and money. Because of this, even though I agree my daughter is "disabled" a better term that could be used to describe her is disadvantaged.

SamMom912
by Gold Member on Apr. 18, 2014 at 1:37 PM
1 mom liked this

yes. I believe they are... IMO the definition of disability is " an impaired ability".. and my son has impaired abilities regading social, emotional development.

lady_katie
by Silver Member on Apr. 18, 2014 at 1:41 PM
3 moms liked this

Yes. A person has to have difficulties, deficits and impairments in order to meet the criteria for diagnosis. Autism is a disorder, and it is always going to come with some degree of disability. 

rainboz
by on Apr. 18, 2014 at 1:45 PM
Well I can't speak for every one but my daughter is disabled because her condition effects practically every aspect of her life in a negative way. But she is severe case. :-)
Nickmom1118
by Nicole on Apr. 18, 2014 at 1:51 PM
1 mom liked this
Yes. But because it is a spectrum, there will be different degrees of disability.
trippyhippy
by Bronze Member on Apr. 18, 2014 at 1:59 PM

My son is severely disabled due to his autism.  It effects every single aspect of his life in a dramatic way.

TheLadyAmalthea
by Bronze Member on Apr. 18, 2014 at 2:01 PM

For some people, it is a disability. Some people can get through in life ok with autism. Other people need assistance for the rest of their lives. Some people are never able to talk. For my son, it's a disability. It isn't a physical disability, but a disability that affects how he can function in the world without assistance. He is almost 7 and he cannot function by himself. At this point, if he makes no improvement, he will need to have 24 hour care. I think people get too hung up on the word disability. People picture it in their minds as a person paralyzed in a wheel chair, or a person missing limbs, or something that is to feel sorry about. Many things in life can be a disability to some one when it affects how they can function in life, nothing to feel sorry for or nothing to be ashamed of. That is how I personally view a disability. 

meandmyboys124
by Kylynn on Apr. 18, 2014 at 2:06 PM
It really depends on the child. My 5 yo on the spectrum is not disabled. He is high functioning. Now my 3 yo, he is disabled. Cannot take care of himself at all, he is a runner, non verbal, has issues with his digestive track, and there is loads more.
Momof4AEMW
by Gold Member on Apr. 18, 2014 at 2:20 PM

For my 2 kids with ASD, yes.  For everyone with ASD, I'm not sure.  I think a lot depends on how the person's abilities are affected. 

SamMom912
by Gold Member on Apr. 18, 2014 at 2:46 PM

 I dont think of the word disability to be limiting... and I think you are right, that some people see it as a limit.. and for me-- it is just the ability-- differently-- not typically. So I think you and I are in agreement-- just stated different.
Not that they cant-- just that its a different (more challenging) path....
dis (different) ability. By NO MEANS will my son NOT be a productive part of society... Im hoping he leads it... :D....  

Quoting ineedcoffeemom:

I have a feeling this word is offensive to some people. Just because "disabled" brings to mind many negative things for people. Personally, I do think the description fits my daughter. She IS unable to do many things people her same age can and are expected to do. But, with that said, just because she can't speak (no matter whether she is ever able to or not) doesn't mean she can't be a productive part of society .... she could learn to use an alternate communication device. The same goes for the other things she lacks ..... even if she never fits the norm, doesn't mean she can't be a part of the whole.

I think that's where some people might struggle with the word "disabled." They may think about all the things people CAN'T do when they have this label. But I don't think about it that way. I simply think it means there are some things my daughter will have to do in a different way..... but it doesn't mean she won't do them at all. Like a person in a wheelchair .... just because they can't walk with their feet doesn't mean they can't get from place to place, they just have to do it in a different way. And they may be limited to do things, but only because society makes it so ....... a wheelchair access can be added anywhere, it just takes time and money. I think the same goes for my daughter. Every obstacle can be overcome, sadly it just takes time and money. Because of this, even though I agree my daughter is "disabled" a better term that could be used to describe her is disadvantaged.

 

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