Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

Teaching Him To Ride A Bike???

Posted by on Apr. 21, 2014 at 11:57 PM
  • 20 Replies

         My four year old just received a new bicycle with training wheels. He had a plastic tricylcle before and could not ride it. I thought it was becausue the wheels don't turn well enough or maybe the handle were a bit too stiff for him to handle. So I went out and got him a bicycle and besides it was also on sale, and cool colors ( which I know my son wouldn't care too much about). So now that he has it I find him still with the same struggles as with the plastic trike. I notice he can sit well on the  trike, but doesn't moves his legs to start the pedaling. Instead he'll either have me pull him or he'll push himself. Are there any tips to help him start to pedal?

by on Apr. 21, 2014 at 11:57 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
darbyakeep45
by Darby on Apr. 22, 2014 at 5:08 AM

I put my son's feet on the pedals and push his feet/legs myself so he can see what he's doing.  Plus my son is in PT so that helps.  Good luck!

SamMom912
by Gold Member on Apr. 22, 2014 at 7:21 AM
2 moms liked this

Motor planning is using the brain to direct the body to be able to sequence and perform goal-directed motor tasks.  Learning to ride a bike, tie shoelaces, and learning karate or dance moves are all examples of learning new motor tasks.  Whereas most children can learn these tasks with relatively few repetitions, children with autism and sensory processing issues often require an excessive amount of practice to be able to learn these tasks.

  This is because the ability to motor plan depends on adequate functioning of the sensory systems including the vestibular, tactile, and proprioceptive senses.  Without proper functioning of these systems, children have a hard time knowing where their bodies are in relation to other objects in the environment.  When they do finally learn how to perform these tasks, the movements are often uncoordinated and awkward.

Keep in mind that children with motor planning issues may require one on one attention to be able to learn these activities and they will probably need a lot of patience.  They may seem to ignore directions given to them, but they are most likely not doing the requested activity because it is really, really hard for them.  They have difficulty getting the message from their brains to their bodies to perform. 

Hugs! Tough one! 

wildchild.com
by Janine on Apr. 22, 2014 at 7:54 AM
1 mom liked this
My son is 9 & he's been practicing riding his bike for a few years. He still has the training wheels on his bike. But the more he rides it the more he gets it. Good luck!
Charizma77
by Carissa on Apr. 22, 2014 at 8:08 AM

I'm no help my 9 yo hates riding his bike..hates it..won't even try.. This summer we are going to work on it..

maddy324
by Member on Apr. 22, 2014 at 9:57 PM
1 mom liked this
Yep, I tried that. But that seems like the only way to properly show him. And it's great your son has PT, I'm in the process now of tryong to get my son extra services like PT, but the school wants to give us a hard time with it. But overall I'm very proud of my little guy and all the strides he has made so far.

Quoting darbyakeep45:

I put my son's feet on the pedals and push his feet/legs myself so he can see what he's doing.  Plus my son is in PT so that helps.  Good luck!

maddy324
by Member on Apr. 22, 2014 at 10:07 PM
I thank you so much for all of this very usefull information. Now it all makes sense. I learned to become very patient along the way with teaching my son things as he grows. I kind of figured it was sensory related, because it reminds me of when he was potty training, and un able to make that connection with brain to his body. So just about two months ago he became full time potty trained, day and nights(yeah). So just like that took practice and patience. I guess this will just be another notch in his little belt as well.

Quoting SamMom912:

Motor planning is using the brain to direct the body to be able to sequence and perform goal-directed motor tasks.  Learning to ride a bike, tie shoelaces, and learning karate or dance moves are all examples of learning new motor tasks.  Whereas most children can learn these tasks with relatively few repetitions, children with autism and sensory processing issues often require an excessive amount of practice to be able to learn these tasks.

  This is because the ability to motor plan depends on adequate functioning of the sensory systems including the vestibular, tactile, and proprioceptive senses.  Without proper functioning of these systems, children have a hard time knowing where their bodies are in relation to other objects in the environment.  When they do finally learn how to perform these tasks, the movements are often uncoordinated and awkward.

Keep in mind that children with motor planning issues may require one on one attention to be able to learn these activities and they will probably need a lot of patience.  They may seem to ignore directions given to them, but they are most likely not doing the requested activity because it is really, really hard for them.  They have difficulty getting the message from their brains to their bodies to perform. 

Hugs! Tough one! 

jowen905
by Jan on Apr. 22, 2014 at 10:10 PM
1 mom liked this

 We used to push my son's feet and legs too.  He was about 10 before he could balance and ride the bike.  Practice, practice, practice, give up for awhile, practice, take a break, practice, practice some more.  Finally he got it, but it's still not one of his favorite things to do, and he's almost 13 now.  Good luck!

Quoting darbyakeep45:

I put my son's feet on the pedals and push his feet/legs myself so he can see what he's doing.  Plus my son is in PT so that helps.  Good luck!

 

Jan

maddy324
by Member on Apr. 22, 2014 at 10:15 PM
1 mom liked this
Lol, thank you for those very light hearted, words of encouragement. Sounds like a very typical day in the life of parents with an autistic child. Practice, patience,practice,patience. That's just the name of the game.

Quoting jowen905:

 We used to push my son's feet and legs too.  He was about 10 before he could balance and ride the bike.  Practice, practice, practice, give up for awhile, practice, take a break, practice, practice some more.  Finally he got it, but it's still not one of his favorite things to do, and he's almost 13 now.  Good luck!


Quoting darbyakeep45:

I put my son's feet on the pedals and push his feet/legs myself so he can see what he's doing.  Plus my son is in PT so that helps.  Good luck!


 

Simran81
by Bronze Member on Apr. 23, 2014 at 3:31 AM

My son does the same thing, pushes himself. I am going to leave it to him. I have tried to show him how to pedal, but he gets irritated. I am happy that he is atleast sitting on the tricycle, he wouldnt do even that 2 months ago. I don't take his tricycle outdoors, cause he is going to say "all done" at the drop of a hat and I will have to push it around. He is 3.

want10more
by on Apr. 23, 2014 at 3:33 AM

my pal w/ an austistic kid? he ducktaped his boys foots to the pedals. pushed him so he could feel it, then made him go...........

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN