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Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

My son got Non-spectrum and dx with Dyspraxia because he can point and smile

Posted by on May. 11, 2014 at 2:07 AM
  • 25 Replies

The lady that I talked to when I got the results does not seem to believe he ever struggled with anything. I gave them as much background as I could (even though they never really asked how he was as a baby aside from stupid generic answer sheet which I thought was strange) so they obviously knew I really thought he was Autistic so in BOLD writint they write WESLEY DOES NOT MEET ALL THE CRITERIA FOR A DIAGNOSIS OF AUTISM which I found kinda rude and of course I took it personally as if they were thinking I was a crazy mom or something. Then the lady smiles as she circles his score and repeats he is nonspectrum, then she randomly says, while I am telling her why I thought he was, again that he is NOT... AUTISTIC very slowly with a large grin. Now, I have recently been diagnosed with ASD and it was really hard to talk to that lady, she even had the nerve to tell me to look at her when she was talking, sorry i cant understand people when i look at them. I cant really read people so I dont know if they were only stating the facts or if they were trying to get me to see I was wrong because I felt the way they wrote the paper was kind of an attack. She also went out of her way to tell me things he was doing as we were sitting in the room that she said Autistic children would "Never" do. I quote Never because she said Never. He was climing the counter for bubbles, he was happy and kept saying "bubbles, bubbles" I told him if he wanted bubbles he had to ask the lady. She came in and he asked "Can i have the bubbles please" and he pointed to the counter. Then she said, "See, something like that an Autistic child would never do". I told her I have worked on him with his language since he was a baby and I have taught him how to ask and what to say. She told me that you can not teach an autistic child that. She said pointing can not be taught either. He did not start pointing till he was a few months to his 2nd birthday. She does not believe me because he can do it now.I do not think I "taught" him to point, I do not believe her that Autistic children can not ask for things or point. I know the DSM-V says thats a deal breaker but I was wondering how other parents thought of what this lady has said. Do you agree? Does your child do any of what my son did? Did they learn it through therapy or by you if they did not have it before? She said he was to responsive to everything even though the papers she wrote on him are contradictory and he met the 30 score cut off but for some reason changed it to a 28.5 in front of me.  I am a bit confused because her report says oposite things and then the score sheet is not marked where she clearly states he had issues. He was diagnosed with Dyspraxia but I did not find that out till I got in my car to read the report. So why did I feel she was more interested with telling me he was not autistic then telling me what they did find? So she says after all of it that he is boarderline and needs to be watched. He has the repetative play and obsessions and social difficutly but its not severe enough so she wants to re evaluate him in 9 months. She wants me to put him in school to see how he does with the high demands and the social atmosphere. I wonder though, if he can do all this now wont he still be doing it later? The DSM-V apparently wont allow them to be to social or point so what is watching him and re-evaluating him going to do if no matter what age you are, you still have to follow those guidlines? I wonder how I even got the DX when I can point and have a conversation. I am really confused so if anyone has been through this please let me know your experiences. I do not mind if he is not autistic, I am just curious on how he can meet everything and not meet it at the same time etc.

by on May. 11, 2014 at 2:07 AM
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Replies (1-10):
AnnaNonamus
by Bronze Member on May. 11, 2014 at 6:36 AM
1 mom liked this

Personally, I would look into finding a new doctor. There is a lot of criteria that goes into a diagnosis, but discounting it based on him being able to show emotion, and pointing is crazy. 

How old is your son? Is he in school yet? When my daughter was diagnosed, the school contracted the team that did the diagnosis. Part of the process was a 3-4 page questionnaire that they had several people each fill out. Her teacher from the year before filled one out, her teacher from that year, and me and her dad. It identified the issues we all saw, and the problems we each saw. We had to do a lot of interviews over the course of about 2 months, which included information dating back to my pregnancy and Gillian from birth (and once we started, we were able to see a lot of signs almost from the moment she was born, as she had some decent sensory issues from the start). 

But the biggest part was that she was observed by 4 different people at different times over those two months, sometimes without her realizing it (such as someone sitting in during her class time), and several interviews with her. She had to see a speech therapist, a physical therapist, an OT, and two counselors. 

It was lengthy, but it was worth it. 

But, had we seen the woman you saw, she would not have been diagnosed. She is good with showing and identifying emotions. She was able to identify things she wanted. But those are only two things on a long list of identifying criteria, and they do not all have to be met. 


Definitely look into into finding another doctor- don't let this woman get you down, it doesn't sound like she has much actual experience with Autism. 

darbyakeep45
by Darby on May. 11, 2014 at 7:27 AM

Yeah, I'd get a second opinion if I were you mama.  Hugs!

Momof4AEMW
by Gold Member on May. 11, 2014 at 9:19 AM

You can always get a second opinion.  I also think if it is ASD he will only grow into his features and increase his testing score.  It won't go away.  My two kids diagnosed will not point, one is still nonverbal and the other very behind in speech.  They are not social with other children.  They have many stereotypical ASD behaviors.  My third I tested has some traits that were recognized by the doc, but we're not enough to pass the testing as having ASD.  She was too social, gestured, speech delay was caught up after four years of speech.  But she is ridged in some behaviors, routines, etc. she ended up with other diagnoses from that appt, just not the ASD.  We will keep watching her and try again later if things keep developing.  She may just not have it, and that's a good thing.  I hope you get your answers.  I'd find a new doc.  I don't think you will ever trust this one.

lady_katie
by Silver Member on May. 11, 2014 at 9:29 AM
Ugh that Dr. Does not sound like they know what they're doing! My son is moderately autistic and every professional he has seen agrees, yet NO ONE has questioned the fact that we taught him to point and request things. He can even sign "please" while saying "milk please!" And handing me his cup! That's the whole reason he's in therapy, to teach him these things!
lady-J-Rock
by Bronze Member on May. 11, 2014 at 10:07 AM
1 mom liked this
Yeah we taught Xavier to point. All three of his therapist, my husband and I worked on it. One person would hold an object another would take his hand form the pointer finger and extend his arm while saying look. Or I want that while pointing when out shopping. We also got our older two to point to things in the store like cookies and cereal they wanted. He figured it out fairly quick I point to cookies mom asks oh you want cookies I say yes and I get cookies.


Quoting lady_katie: Ugh that Dr. Does not sound like they know what they're doing! My son is moderately autistic and every professional he has seen agrees, yet NO ONE has questioned the fact that we taught him to point and request things. He can even sign "please" while saying "milk please!" And handing me his cup! That's the whole reason he's in therapy, to teach him these things!
lancet98
by Bronze Member on May. 11, 2014 at 10:13 AM

I think you're extremely over reacting and way over-interpreting what was said.   There is really no reason to be so angry with this individual.   You asked her opinion, she gave it, and from everything I read, based on sound reasoning.

But you never said what her qualifications are.  What is her certification, licenses?    What's her title?   Are you going to MacDonald's and looking for grade A Porterhouse steaks?

If you don't like the results and are determined to have your son diagnosed with autism(why you'd feel that way is beyond me, you should not want him diagnosed as autistic because you are diagnosed ASD, that's just wrong), get another opinion.  

With the symptoms he has, he qualifies for some services.   If the service level needs to be changed at some point due to a changed diagnosis, so be it.

If you really are that good at teaching your little guy to do things, he won't be harmed by a delay in getting a different diagnosis.   In fact you seem to be getting veyr good results.

shugerbit
by Member on May. 11, 2014 at 12:49 PM
She also went out of her way to tell me things he was doing as we were sitting in the room that she said Autistic children would "Never" do. I quote Never because she said Never. He was climing the counter for bubbles, he was happy and kept saying "bubbles, bubbles" I told him if he wanted bubbles he had to ask the lady. She came in and he asked "Can i have the bubbles please" and he pointed to the counter. Then she said, "See, something like that an Autistic child would never do". 

Now this I kind of agree with her, but not the extreme of never. The main markers for autism being speech delay and lack of gesturing. Which in your statement that is the exact opposite. I am not diagnosing him, only you know your child, and you also never stated his age which can make a big difference. Maybe he is dyspraxic and ocd, but not asd?. In the end all that matters is that he is getting services, not just the label.

My son is almost 4 and has learned to point to pictures on a paper, but it must be with verbal prompting, and does not understand pointing to something across the room or not immediately in front of him. So I agree kids can learn. He also only has a few approximations of words at the time being. 

kinshipcaremama
by on May. 11, 2014 at 1:27 PM

I recommend you take your son to a program that offers a "multi-disciplinary" evaluation.  This is where several professionals evaluate the child and come to an agreement of what the dx should be.  Usually this will happen at a teaching university or major hospital.  It is the most accurate way to get a dx that really fits your child.  You could run from doctor to doctor until you find someone who agrees with you but how accurate would that be?  I am sure you want the best, most accurate dx for your son so you can meet his needs in the best way possible.  That dx may or may not be ASD. 

I know it is expensive to get a true multi-disciplinary dx.  My son has been twice and the school district paid both times.  I honestly didn't believe my boy had Autism and questioned the districts evaluation.  I requested an independent eval which is what led us to the university evaluation.  They dx'd him with PDD-NOS, mainly because I was in such denial.  Three years later when he was due for his school eval they sent us back to the university where he received his true dx.  By that point I was no longer in denial.  My son is 23, so this happened before the explosion in ASD diagnosis' but if it were my child I would only have a multi-disciplinary team for dx. 

Good luck.  I hope you get the answers you are looking for.

emarin77
by Silver Member on May. 11, 2014 at 4:33 PM

Is this person who diagnosed your child specialised in Autism?  Every child with Autism is different, that is why it is a spectrum disorder.

Jenibob
by Bronze Member on May. 12, 2014 at 9:40 PM

My son started with an apraxia diagnosis,  next came global developmental delay, then PDD-NOS. 

My thought is as long as the diagnosis opens up services and interventions, you're headed in the right direction.  Time and retesting can show if he qualifies for a different diagnosis.

Sorry the appt. was a bad experience.  That stinks.

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