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Autism - Support Across the Spectrum Autism - Support Across the Spectrum

Suggestions in place of restraints

Posted by on Jun. 16, 2014 at 10:50 PM
  • 32 Replies
DS has been restrained at least 10 times. I think the restraining is causing more harm than good and was wondering what ideas I could give them to do in place of restraining DS.
by on Jun. 16, 2014 at 10:50 PM
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Replies (1-10):
JTMOM422
by Brenda on Jun. 16, 2014 at 10:53 PM

Who is restraining him and why are they restraining him? I would suggest they try other approaches before coming to the restraining. Is the issues sensory or behavioral?

Logansmom1999
by Kristina on Jun. 16, 2014 at 11:00 PM

Do they have proper training in restraint techniques? If not, they could seriously injure your child or even themselves..

mypbandj
by Jen on Jun. 16, 2014 at 11:03 PM
How old is he?
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Momof4AEMW
by Gold Member on Jun. 16, 2014 at 11:04 PM

What are they restraining him with and for what behaviors?  Is he a danger to himself or others?  If not, I don't see why they would need to.  I know you're looking for suggestions to avoid this, which I wish I could give.  But doesn't the school have a behavioral person that should be able to answer alternatives?  Ten sounds like a lot and like they got permission to do it so just keep doing it rather than trying to help your son through whatever is happening.  I can't see that a little boy that looks like such a sweetie in your picture loving on his baby sister needs regular restraining.  You're right to be asking these question, but I'd get behaviorists in the school system or AEA involved.  This just does not seem ok. 

sunshinepraying
by Bronze Member on Jun. 17, 2014 at 9:09 AM

The school has been.. they say they use it as a last resort, but they've done it at least 10 times within the past few months. So I am trying to find suggestions for what else they could do in place of that. They do it for behavioral.

Quoting JTMOM422:

Who is restraining him and why are they restraining him? I would suggest they try other approaches before coming to the restraining. Is the issues sensory or behavioral?


sunshinepraying
by Bronze Member on Jun. 17, 2014 at 9:10 AM

They have a specific way they have to restrain him..standing behind him and holding his arms around himself, I believe is how they do it. It reminds me of a straight jacket.

Quoting Logansmom1999:

Do they have proper training in restraint techniques? If not, they could seriously injure your child or even themselves..


sunshinepraying
by Bronze Member on Jun. 17, 2014 at 9:11 AM

6 1/2

Quoting mypbandj: How old is he?


JTMOM422
by Brenda on Jun. 17, 2014 at 9:14 AM

I would call an emergency IEP and ask that they also do an BIP behavioral intervention plan. I would make sure that restraining is the very last form of intervention that they use. I would ask that you be shown how he is restrained so that you have a idea of what is being done. I would also ask that there be a place made that is full of soft things that he can have his meltdown on. Like a cozy corner that is full of pillows. Sometimes it can get down to being sensory based. Does the restraining calm him down? If so then I would also suggest a squeeze vest or weighted vest. Maybe having those on would cause less of the behavioral issues. But definately ask for a BIP to be put in place for these circumstances. I would also DEMAND each time he is restrained that there be written documention of what led up to the restraining and how long it took him to calm down. That way you can see if there is something specific that is causing this

Quoting sunshinepraying:

The school has been.. they say they use it as a last resort, but they've done it at least 10 times within the past few months. So I am trying to find suggestions for what else they could do in place of that. They do it for behavioral.

Quoting JTMOM422:

Who is restraining him and why are they restraining him? I would suggest they try other approaches before coming to the restraining. Is the issues sensory or behavioral?


sunshinepraying
by Bronze Member on Jun. 17, 2014 at 9:28 AM

I believe they stand behind him and hold his arms so they wrap around his body tightly in the front. It reminds me of a straight jacket. They say they do it as a last resort, but I've gotten at least 10 of these reports, one of which was done three times in one day. They do it for elopment or when they claim he is a threat to himself or others..although he has never hurt another child, nor himself. He does have meltdowns. Although there is always a good reason for what started the meltdown..they just don't seem to focus on that part and instead, have someone come in and take him away once he is in the meltdown stage (or if he is in the corner and cries too loud in the classroom). He has only hurt the teachers..and I think that's only when they're doing the "transport" or restraints. He might try to bite or kick them then. They have a behavior plan for him, and claim it is a last resort, but it happens often enough to start causing negative responses in him, I believe, when others try to touch him when he's upset, and 10 times of it is a lot for a last resort IMO. He would never hurt anyone, except for when someone grabs him from behind and holds him like they do..then it's like instinct to fight, you know? But no, he would never hurt someone otherwise. What's AEA? 

I'm reading the restaint forms, and most of them are for eloping or threat or elopement. Some say during his meltdown, he may have thrown something, tried to use the phone (which he has told me is because he's trying to call home), disruption, screaming, one time was climbing on furniture (when they took away something he was fixated on and he tried climbing the furniture to get it back), not following directions, destroyed materials (although I have never been shown what he's destroyed..I'd like to see what he did, but am never told I can), one is for wedging himself under the lunch table and another time was for doing so between another piece of furniture.

Quoting Momof4AEMW:

What are they restraining him with and for what behaviors?  Is he a danger to himself or others?  If not, I don't see why they would need to.  I know you're looking for suggestions to avoid this, which I wish I could give.  But doesn't the school have a behavioral person that should be able to answer alternatives?  Ten sounds like a lot and like they got permission to do it so just keep doing it rather than trying to help your son through whatever is happening.  I can't see that a little boy that looks like such a sweetie in your picture loving on his baby sister needs regular restraining.  You're right to be asking these question, but I'd get behaviorists in the school system or AEA involved.  This just does not seem ok. 


sunshinepraying
by Bronze Member on Jun. 17, 2014 at 9:53 AM

We actually don't have an IEP yet. They tried before to talk us out of doing one, but the psychiatrist told us not to listen to them and to it anyway, and i'm glad we did. We have the initial IEP meeting this afternoon. He does have a BIP though, although we don't think it's been helping much. They focus so much on the meltdown stage and after, rather than looking for what caused the meltdown. They claim it's the last form they use, although I don't think it always is. I did ask for them to show me, and the way they do it is by grabbing him from behind and forcing his arms around himself like a straight jacket. They don't have any sensory rooms or rooms equipt for it. They usually take him into the Alternative Education teacher's office. There are some pillows there, but otherwise it's a regular office..he's just contained there. I have been told that he has at least on one occasion (I'm not sure if it usually happens), she will feel him just kind of finally (after fighting for who knows how long while being restrained) just kind of collapse and cry. They seem to see that as a good thing and then she will let him go. Like he's no longer rigid, but is like he gives in an they claim relaxes some and then just collapses on the floor and cries. I don't see that as a good thing either but maybe I'm wrong. That shows me he finally gave into them but feels defeated. And then a bit later, she says he might get back to normal again. Although there's got to be a better way to get him back to being "normal" again. I'll look into a vest. I do know that now, which we think might be due to the restraints (and the school psychologist admitted it's possible that it could be the reason, although she'd probably deny it if I brought it up with the school), that DS no longer wants to be touch if hurt, upset, or did something he feels is wrong. And this is the kid who doesn't understand personal issues and loves getting hugs and comfort and hugs random people. So that doesn't sound like him at all. They do have to fill out a restrant form each time they do it. I have in the above response their reasons for doing the restraints. But every time he has a meltdown or whatever, there is always a logical reason..he is super smart, but can't get out his thoughts well. But if they actually took care of what happened before the meltdown, then the meltdown wouldn't have happened at all. And it really saddens me that they don't do that. His sub has been making the needed adjustments for him (and she is the only one who has tried to do so) when able and it has made a HUGE difference on how he does in school. I can figure out almost every time what leads to the meltdown and it is almost always something that could have been easily changed beforehand to prevent that meltdown. I'm hoping after the IEP meeting today, that now that he has the Autistic diagnosis, maybe they'll actually make real changes and stop treating him like he's a bad kid if he has a meltdown..and really try to understand how he functions, and try to make accomodations

Quoting JTMOM422:

I would call an emergency IEP and ask that they also do an BIP behavioral intervention plan. I would make sure that restraining is the very last form of intervention that they use. I would ask that you be shown how he is restrained so that you have a idea of what is being done. I would also ask that there be a place made that is full of soft things that he can have his meltdown on. Like a cozy corner that is full of pillows. Sometimes it can get down to being sensory based. Does the restraining calm him down? If so then I would also suggest a squeeze vest or weighted vest. Maybe having those on would cause less of the behavioral issues. But definately ask for a BIP to be put in place for these circumstances. I would also DEMAND each time he is restrained that there be written documention of what led up to the restraining and how long it took him to calm down. That way you can see if there is something specific that is causing this

Quoting sunshinepraying:

The school has been.. they say they use it as a last resort, but they've done it at least 10 times within the past few months. So I am trying to find suggestions for what else they could do in place of that. They do it for behavioral.

Quoting JTMOM422:

Who is restraining him and why are they restraining him? I would suggest they try other approaches before coming to the restraining. Is the issues sensory or behavioral?


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